9780226115634

Dogs: A New Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior, and Evolution

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780226115634

  • ISBN10:

    0226115631

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-10-01
  • Publisher: UNIV OF CHICAGO PRESS

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Summary

Biologists, breeders and trainers, and champion sled dog racers, Raymond and Lorna Coppinger have more than four decades of experience with literally thousands of dogs. Offering a scientifically informed perspective on canines and their relations with humans, the Coppingers take a close look at eight different types of dogshousehold, village, livestock guarding, herding, sled-pulling, pointing, retrieving, and hound. They argue that dogs did not evolve directly from wolves, nor were they trained by early humans; instead they domesticated themselves to exploit a new ecological niche: Mesolithic village dumps. Tracing the evolution of today's breeds from these village dogs, the Coppingers show how characteristic shapes and behaviorsfrom pointing and baying to the sleek shapes of running dogsarise from both genetic heritage and the environments in which pups are raised. For both dogs and humans to get the most out of each other, we need to understand and adapt to the biological needs and dispositions of our canine companions, just as they have to ours.

Author Biography

Raymond Coppinger is a professor of biology at Hampshire College. He is the author of Fishing Dogs and coauthor of Wheelchair Assistance Dogs.

Lorna Coppinger is the award-winning author of The World of Sled Dogs. Together they founded Hampshire's Livestock Dog Project.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments 11(2)
Preface: The Right Kind of Dog 13(8)
Introduction: Studying Dogs? 21(1)
Why Study Dogs?
21(6)
How to Study and Who Studies, Dogs
27(10)
Part I. The Evolution of The Basic Dog: Commensalism 37(60)
Wolves Evolve into Dogs
39(30)
The Pinocchio Hypothesis of Dog Origin
41(1)
Taming the Wolf
42(5)
Training the Wolf
47(2)
Domesticating the Wolf
49(1)
Speciation Requires Populations That Evolve-Not Individuals
50(2)
Speciation Requires Differential Mortality
52(17)
Village Dogs
69(16)
The Mesolithic Island
72(13)
Natural Breeds
85(12)
People Become Conscious of Dogs
89(8)
Part II. Working Dogs and People: Mutualism 97(128)
Developmental Environments
101(56)
Livestock-Guarding Dogs
101(1)
In the Nest: Shaping the Behavior
101(18)
The Transhumance: Distributing and Mixing Genes
119(11)
The Transhumance: Evolving the Size and Shape
130(6)
Breed Genesis: Selecting for Color
136(4)
Walking Hounds
140(17)
The Physical Conformation of a Breed
157(32)
Sled Dogs-How Do They Run?
157(19)
The Shape of the Team
176(5)
Running Is Social Behavior
181(4)
The Society of a Sled Dog Team
185(2)
The Value of the Breed Standard
187(2)
Behavioral Conformation
189(36)
Herding Dogs, Retrievers, and Pointers
189(22)
The Border Collie's Behavioral Conformation
211(6)
Motor Patterns
217(8)
Part III. Are People the Dog's Best Friend? Parasitism, Amensalism, and Dulosis 225(46)
Household Dogs
227(26)
Measuring the Benefit to Humans of the Household Dog
237(16)
Assistance Dogs
253(18)
Part IV. The Tail Wags the Dog 271(56)
What's in the Name Canis familiaris?
273(10)
The Age of the Dog
283(12)
Why Dogs Look the Way They Do
295(22)
How to Change Size
299(3)
How to Change Shape
302(5)
The Shape of Intelligence
307(1)
Rapid Evolution of Breeds
308(3)
Neoteny Paedomorphism, and the Evolution of Dogs from Wolves
311(6)
Conclusion
317(10)
Bibliography 327(12)
Index 339

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