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Drawing : Space, Form, and Expression,9780133046434
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Drawing : Space, Form, and Expression

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780133046434

ISBN10:
0133046435
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/1/1995
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

This highly-readable book describes the basic fundamentals of drawing in terms of spatial organization, three-dimensional form, and expressive value. Its portfolio of old and new masterworks allows the reader to compare and contrast these exemplary visual models, and the accompanying written descriptions clearly explain the works presented. This book covers such topics as three-dimensional drawing and the picture plane; two-dimensional drawing, positive and negative shape, and ambiguous space; shape, proportion, and layout; the interaction of drawing and design; linear perspective; form in space; form in light; subject matter; expression; using color; drawing the human figure; and visualization. For creatives in the field of fine arts, graphic artists, and illustrators.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Introduction 1(1)
The Legacy of Drawing
2(5)
Extending the Definition of Drawing
7(4)
The Student and Master Drawings
11(1)
The Issue of Talent
12(1)
The Public Side of Drawing
12(1)
Seeing Versus Naming
12(2)
Drawing as a Process
14(2)
The Merits of a Sketchbook
16(4)
The Three-Dimensional Space of a Drawing
20(27)
Making Your Mark
21(1)
The Mark Versus the Line
21(1)
Figure-Ground
22(2)
The Picture Plan
24(1)
The Picture Plan Begins Your Space
25(2)
Fundamental Methods for Creating Three-Dimensional Space
27(10)
Looking at Space
37(4)
Gesture Drawing as a Means of Capturing Space
41(6)
The Two-Dimensional Space of a Drawing
47(12)
Two-Dimensional Space and Modern Act
47(2)
The Shape of a Drawing
49(1)
Positive and Negative Shape
49(1)
Implications of the Term Negative Shape
50(1)
Accentuating the Positive or the Negative
50(3)
Ambiguous Space
53(6)
Shape, Proportion, and Layout
59(17)
Drawing in Proportion
59(1)
Shape and Proportion
60(1)
Shape and Foreshortening
60(2)
Measuring with Your Pencil
62(1)
Using the Viewfinder to See Proportion
62(2)
Spatial Configurations
64(1)
Angling and the Picture Plane
64(3)
Advice on the Use of Proportioning Techniques
67(2)
Laying Out Your Drawing
69(2)
Tips on Selecting a Vantage Point
71(1)
Tips on Laying Out Your Image
72(4)
The Interaction of Drawing and Design
76(18)
Drawing and Design: A Natural Union
76(1)
Principles of Design
77(10)
Gesture Drawing as a Means to Design
87(7)
Linear Perspective
94(22)
Point of View
94(5)
Convergence and Fixed Position
99(4)
One-Point Perspective
103(4)
Two-Point Perspective
107(2)
The Circle in Perspective
109(1)
Other-Geometric Volumes and Near-Geometric Volumes
110(1)
The Advantages and Shortcomings of Linear Perspective
111(2)
Three-Point Perspective
113(3)
Form In Space
116(27)
The Visual and the Tactile
117(1)
Form and Gestalt
117(2)
Approaches to General Form Analysis and Depiction
119(18)
Surface Structure of Natural Forms
137(6)
Form In Light
143(23)
The Directional Nature of Light
144(1)
Value Shapes
144(3)
Local Value
147(2)
Directional Light and Local Value
149(2)
Optical Grays
151(3)
Chiaroscuro
154(12)
Subject Matter: Sources and Meanings
166(27)
Traditional Subject-Matter Areas
167(15)
Subject Matter as a Source of Meaning
182(4)
Thematic Variations
186(7)
The Form of Expression
193(23)
The Two Definitions of the Term Form
193(1)
Studying the Form of a Masterwork
193(3)
The Matter of Pictorial Invention
196(1)
What is Abstraction Anyway?
197(6)
The Primacy of Form in the Visual Arts
203(1)
Form as a Source of Meaning
203(5)
Troubleshooting Your Drawings
208(2)
Critical Questions to Ask About Your Drawings
210(6)
Using Color in Drawing
216(14)
Basic Color Theory and Terminology
217(1)
Intensity
218(1)
Color Schemes
219(2)
Using Color to Represent Space and Form
221(4)
Color and Design
225(2)
Color and Expression
227(3)
Visualizations: Drawing Upon Your Imagination
230(23)
Freeing Up Your Imagination
233(4)
Drawing the Visualized Image
237(6)
Categories of the Visualized Image
243(10)
Portfolio of Student Drawings
253(26)
Self-Portrait
253(5)
Visualized and Narrative Imagery
258(4)
The Figure
262(5)
Still Life
267(5)
Abstract and Nonobjective Imagery
272(7)
Portfolio of Contemporary Drawings
279(35)
Mixed Media and Installation
280(4)
Technologically Produced Art
284(3)
Social and Political Themes
287(4)
Feminist Perspectives
291(2)
Ethnic Identities
293(5)
Realism and Reality
298(4)
Narrative Art
302(3)
The Continuing Abstract Tradition
305(5)
Art with Spiritual Concerns
310(4)
Glossary of Media 314(11)
Papers
314(2)
Dry Media
316(5)
Wet Media
321(4)
Glossary of Terms 325(8)
Index 333


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