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Dreams and Inward Journeys : A Rhetoric and Reader for Writers,9780321366023

Dreams and Inward Journeys : A Rhetoric and Reader for Writers

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780321366023

ISBN10:
0321366026
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $77.60

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Summary

This best-selling collection of readings explores the theme of dreams, the imagination, and the reasoning mind. Encourages the reader to investigate new ways of seeing and understanding themselves. Memory, myths and fairy tales, gender roles, sexuality, obsessions, nature, spirituality. General Interest; Improve writing

Table of Contents

Contents by Strategies and Modes xvii
To the Instructor xxiii
To the Student xxvi
1 DISCOVERING OURSELVES IN WRITING AND READING 1(64)
A Process View of Writing and Reading
2(11)
The Writing Process and Self-Discovery
Stages of the Writing Process
Strategies for Prewriting
Your Computer: Developing an Important Writing Partnership
The Reading Process
Personal and Interpretive Response
Critical and Evaluative Response
"Reading" Electronic Media
Thematic Introduction
13(1)
Readings
Denise Levertov, "The Secret" (poem)
14(3)
"Two girls discover the secret of life in a sudden line of poetry."
Stephen King, "The Symbolic Language of Dreams" (essay)
17(7)
"I think that dreams are a way that people's minds illustrate the nature of their problems. Or maybe even illustrate the answers to their problems in symbolic language."
Ursula K. Le Guin, "A Matter of Trust" (essay)
24(4)
"Consider the story as a dance, the reader and writer as partners. The writer leads, yes; but leading isn't pushing; it's setting up a field of mutuality where two people can move in cooperation with grace."
Virginia Woolf, "Professions for Women" (essay)
28(6)
"Indeed it will be a long time still, I think, before a woman can sit down to write a book without finding a phantom to be slain, a rock to be dashed against."
Amy Tan, "Mother Tongue" (essay)
34(6)
"I began to write stories using all the Englishes I grew up with....I wanted to capture what language ability tests never reveal: [her mother's] intent, her passion, her imagery, the rhythm of her speech and the nature of her thoughts."
Frederick Douglass, "Learning to Read and Write" (essay)
40(4)
"Sheridan's mighty speeches...gave tongue to interesting thoughts of my own soul, which had frequently passed through my mind, and died away for want of utterance."
Steven Holtzman, "Don't Look Back" (essay)
44(6)
"We need to develop a new aesthetic—a digital aesthetic. And the emerging backlash from the literati makes clear to me how urgently we need it."
John G. Ramsay, "Hell's Bibliophiles: The Fifth Way of Looking at an Aliterate" (essay)
50(7)
"If we are going to help our students, We must think of these differences between us, the literate, and them, the aliterate, as bridgeable differences of degree, rather than as insurmountable differences of kind."
Student Writing
Joyce Chang, "Drive Becarefully"
57(3)
"My mom's English is the one I grew up with at home. It is one of the Englishes I speak."
Molly Thomas, "Response to 'Don't Look Back'
60(6)
"It's only when the cultures of readers and technology users take polarized positions that we really have to worry about one group having a superficial relationship with their surrounding world."
Topics for Research and Writing
64(1)
2 PLACES IN NATURE 65(54)
Observing Nature and Writing Descriptions
66(4)
Observing
Words and Images
Revising Initial Descriptions
Establishing Vantage Point and Tone
Thinking About Your Purpose and Audience
Thematic Introduction
70(1)
Readings
Naomi S. Nye, "Fireflies" (poem)
71(2)
"Lately I had looked for you everywhere But only night's smooth stare gazed back."
Diane Ackerman, "Deep Play" (essay)
73(4)
"I knew and abided by the rules of the game I was playing—the weather and animal rules, the time rules, the danger rules, the social rules with my shipmates. I was alert but also ecstatic."
Mary Mackey, "The Distant Cataract About Which We Do Not Speak" (essay)
77(5)
"We are sitting on an island in the American River, right in the middle of...a metropolitan area of well over a million people, but my husband and I like to preserve our mutual delusion."
Donovan Webster, "Inside the Volcano" (essay)
82(7)
"The spatterings glisten like enormous, otherworldly fireworks as they sail through the shadowed air."
Jon Krakauer, "The Khumbu Icefall" (essay)
89(5)
"At one point I was balanced on the unsteady ladder in the predawn gloaming, stepping tenuously from one bent rung to the next, when the ice supporting the ladder on either end began to quiver as if an earthquake had struck."
Terry Tempest Williams, "Ground Truthing" (essay)
94(9)
"The power of nature is the power of a life in association. Nothing stands alone....Each organism is rooted in its own biological niche, drawing its power from its relationship to other organisms."
Theodore Roszak, "The Nature of Sanity: Mental Health and the Outdoors" (essay)
103(5)
"If our culture is out of balance with nature, everything about our lives is affected: family, workplace, school, community—all take on a crazy shape."
Student Writing
David Kerr, "Strawberry Creek: A Search for Origins"
108(3)
"Armed with flashlights, candles, lighters, and matches, we entered the tunnel for Strawberry Creek....Our plan was to wind our way through the city underground."
Sheila Walsh, "Visualizing Our Environment: Communication of Environmental Issues Through Visual Arts"
111(9)
"To change the way that people and whole societies treat the environment, the communication of environmental issues must change."
Topics for Research and Writing
118(1)
3 JOURNEYS IN MEMORY 119(64)
Narration, Memory, and Self-Awareness
120(5)
Making Associations
Focusing and Concentration: The Inner Screen
Dialogue and Characters
Main Idea or Dominant Impression
Drafting and Shaping the Narrative
Revising the Narrative: Point of View and Style
Thematic Introduction
125(1)
Readings
Mark Strand, "Where Are the Waters of Childhood?" (poem)
126(3)
"Now you invent the boat of your flesh and set it upon the waters And drift in the gradual swell, in the laboring salt."
Patricia Hampl, "Memory and Imagination" (essay)
129(10)
"But no memoirist writes for long without experiencing an unsettling disbelief about the reliability of memory, a hunch that memory is not, after all, just memory."
Saira Shah, "The Storyteller's Daughter" (essay)
139(6)
"I am three years old. I am sitting on my father's knee. He is telling me of a magical place: the fairytale landscape you enter in dreams."
Maya Angelou, "The Angel of the Candy Counter" (essay)
145(6)
"Momma backed up inside of herself for a few minutes. I forget everything except her face which was almost a new one to me."
Judith Ortiz Cofer, "Silent Dancing" (essay)
151(8)
"I can feel the reverberations of her laughter. I hear the echoes of her last mocking words: La Gringa La Gringa. And the conga line keeps moving silently past me. There is no music in my dream for the dancers."
Rachel Naomi Remen, "Remembering" (essay)
159(4)
"At the dose of one of her stories, I was overwhelmed by the fact that she had actually managed to live with her memories. I told her this and added, 'I am in awe.'"
Stephen Jay Gould, "Muller Bros. Moving & Storage" (essay)
163(6)
"But we must...struggle to stand back and to scrutinize our own mental certainties....Yes, step back and scrutinize your own mind. But with what?"
Susan L. Engel, "The Past: Audiences and Perspectives" (essay)
169(8)
"It is the norm, rather than the exception, for us to fill in our internal representations of past events with information gleaned from...outside forms, including what other people can tell us."
Student Writing
Melissa Burns, "The Best Seat in the House" (essay)
177(5)
"I regained mental composure after the last note of our program finished resonating in Carnegie Hall....Beneath it all was the underlying essence of my grandfather's love."
Topics for Research and Writing
182(1)
4 DREAMS, MYTHS, AND FAIRY TALES 183(70)
Comparing and Contrasting: Strategies for Thinking and Writing
184(3)
Prewriting for Comparison
Outlining and Transition
Evaluation
Logical Fallacies of Comparison and Contrast
Thematic Introduction
187(1)
Readings
Nikki Giovanni, "ego-tripping (there may be a reason why)" (poem)
188(3)
"All praises All praises I am the one who would save."
Linda Seger, "Universal Stories" (essay)
191(7)
"A myth is a story 'more than true'....It's a story that connects and speaks to us all."
Gabriel Garcia Márquez, "The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World: A Tale for Children" (fiction)
198(5)
"The Captain...would say in fourteen languages, look there, where the wind is so peaceful now that it's gone to sleep beneath the beds, over there, where the sun's so bright that the sunflowers don't know which way to turn, yes, over there, that's Esteban's village."
Marcelo Gleiser, "The Myths of Science—Creation" (essay)
203(5)
"All cultures have attempted to provide an answer to the mystery of creation, and our modern scientific model is no exception. Perhaps more surprisingly, there is an intriguing correspondence between answers suggested by mythic narratives and those suggested by scientific research."
Portfolio of Creation Myths
208(1)
These myths from cultures around the world celebrate the mystery of creation and embody core values and beliefs in imaginative stories of the origins of the world, its creatures, and human beings.
Genesis 2:4-23 (Old Testament of the Hebrew Bible)
208(1)
"How the Sun Was Made: Dawn, Noontide and Night" (Australian Aboriginal)
209(1)
"The Pelasgian Creation Myth" (Ancient Greek)
210(1)
"The Chameleon Finds" (Yao-Bantu, African)
211(1)
"Spider Woman Creates the Humans" (Hopi, Native American)
212(1)
"The Beginning of the World" (Japanese)
213(2)
Bruno Bettelheim, "Fairy Tales and the Existential Predicament" (essay)
215(6)
"[T]he form and structure of fairy tales suggest images to children by which they can structure their daydreams and with them give better direction to their life."
Jane Yolen, "American Cinderella" (essay)
221(7)
"The mass-market American 'Cinderellas' have presented the majority of American children with the wrong dreamb]....and the magic of the old tales has been falsified, the true meaning lost, perhaps forever."
Four Versions of Cinderella
228(1)
The many common elements found in versions from different periods and cultures of this story of an exploited young girl's rise in the world demonstrate the universality of fundamental story lines in imaginative tales that teach and uplift young readers.
The Brothers Grimm, "Aschenputtel"
229(6)
Charles Perrault, "Cendrillon" (adapted by Andrew Lang)
235(5)
"The Algonquin Cinderella"
240(2)
"Tam and Cam" (Vietnam)
242(6)
Student Writing
Joshua Groban, "Two Myths" (essay)
248(6)
"The comparison of different creation myths...represents a reasoned approach to looking at God and creation and thus what true religious conviction really is."
Topics for Research and Writing
252(1)
5 OBSESSIONS AND TRANSFORMATION 253(71)
Definition: Word Boundaries of the Self
254(3)
Public Meanings and Formal Definition
Stipulative and Personal Definitions
Contradiction
Thematic Introduction
257(1)
Readings
W.S. Merwin, "Fog-Horn" (poem)
258(2)
"That throat does not call to anything human But to something men had forgotten, That stirs under fog."
Maressa Hecht Orzack, "Computer Addiction: What Is It?" (essay)
260(6)
"What is it about using computers that makes some people behave in ways in which they would not ordinarily? Is it the technology itself; or is it the way people interact with the technology?"
Andrew Solomon, "Depression" (essay)
266(10)
"Depression is the flaw in love. To be creatures who love, we must be creatures who can despair at what we lose, and depression is the mechanism of that despair."
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, "The Yellow Wallpaper" (fiction)
276(15)
"And she is all the time trying to climb through. But nobody could climb through that pattern—it strangles so."
Diane Ackerman, "A Slender Thread" (essay)
291(7)
"We choose to live. But suicidal people have tunnel vision—no other choice seems possible. A counselor's job is to put windows and doors in that tunnel."
Anne Lamott, "Hunger" (essay)
298(5)
"[W]hatever it was, learning to eat was about learning to live—and deciding to live; and it is one of the most radical things I've ever done."
Carrie Demers, "Chaos or Calm: Rewiring the Stress Response" (essay)
303(8)
"Since stress begins with the perception that our lives (or at least our sense of well-being) are in danger, working with the mind to alter our perceptions is the most powerful technique for quieting our stress response."
Marc Ian Barasch, "What Is a Healing Dream?" (essay)
311(8)
"After a Healing Dream, one may never be the same again."
Student Writing
Sharon Slayton, "The Good Girl" (essay)
319(6)
"So here I am today, thirty-two years old and just beginning to discover myself- as a person who exists outside of the obsession to be good."
Topics for Research and Writing
323(1)
6 JOURNEYS IN SEXUALITY AND GENDER 324(71)
Causality and the Inward Journey
325(3)
Observing and Collecting Information
Causal Logical Fallacies
Thematic Introduction
328(1)
Readings
Pablo Neruda, "The Dream" (poem)
329(3)
"and from the rupture that was breaking our hearts we came forth clean again, naked, loving each other"
Sigmund Freud, "Erotic Wishes and Dreams" (essay)
332(4)
"No one who accepts the view that censorship is the chief reason for dream distortion will be surprised to learn Ann the results of dream interpretation that most of the dreams of adults are traced back by analysis to erotic wishes."
Maxine Hong Kingston, "No Name Woman" (essay)
336(10)
"Carrying the baby to the well shows loving. Otherwise abandon it. Turn its face into the mud. Mothers who love their children take them along. It was probably a girl; there is some hope of forgiveness for boys."
Mary Pipher, "Saplings in the Storm".essay)
346(9)
"Adolescence has always been hard, but it's harder now because of the social changes of the last decade. The protected place in space and time that we once called childhood has grown shorter."
Tajamika Paxton, "Loving a One-armed Man" (essay)
355(8)
"The one-armed man is an image I get in a dream. He's the symbol of men being torn apart by the impossible demands of one-dimensional manhood."
Rachel Lehmann-Haupt, "Multi-Tasking Man" (essay)
363(6)
"But rather than a half-liberated prince in a gray Armani suit, what women really need is Durga's twin brother. A multi-tasking mensch."
Kevin Canty, "The Dog in Me" (essay)
369(8)
"What happened? Where did this idea of equality go off the rails? It's those damn kids, is my opinion....It's like being Miss America, or being blind;...your imagination has nothing to do with the actual experience."
David Sedaris, "I Like Guys" (essay)
377(9)
"It was my hope to win a contest, cash in the prizes, and use the money to visit a psychiatrist who might cure me of having homosexual thoughts....I was willing to try anything."
Student Writing
Rosa Contreras, "On Not Being a Girl" (essay)
386(4)
"By the time I was twelve, I had disappointed my parents in their quest to make me a productive and useful young lady, according to what Mexican custom decrees."
Julie Bordner Apodaca, "Gay Marriage: Why the Resistance?" (essay)
390(6)
"Although some of the arguments against homosexual marriage may seem on the surface to have some justification, most are based on ignorance, irrationality, or fear."
Topics for Research and Writing
394(1)
7 THE DOUBLE/THE OTHER 395(64)
Argument and Dialogue
396(5)
Traditional Argument
Dialogic Argument
Dialogue and Prewriting
Prewriting and the Audience
Defining Key Terms
Evaluating Facts
Feelings in Argument
Thematic Introduction
401(1)
Readings
Judith Ortiz Cofer, "The Other" (poem)
402(3)
"A sloe-eyed dark woman shadows me."
Danny Fingeroth, "The Dual Identity: Of Pimpernels and Immigrants from the Stars" (essay)
405(10)
"Is it braver to be who you are, or to be who you pretend you are? This is the fundamental question of identity."
Robert Johnson, "Owning Your Own Shadow" (essay)
415(6)
"Any repair of our fractured world must start with individuals who have the insight and courage to own their own shadow."
Robert Louis Stevenson, "Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case" from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (fiction)
421(13)
"Many a man would have even blazoned such irregularities as I was guilty of but from the high views that I had set before me, I regarded and hid them with an almost morbid sense of shame."
Kate Sullivan, "J. Lo vs. K. Sul" (essay)
434(5)
"An internal debate ensues between two of my selves: the teen girl who loves to torture herself with unfavorable comparisons to others, and the concerned guru."
Fran Peavey (with Myrna Levy and Charles Varon), "Us and Them" (essay)
439(6)
"Treating our adversaries as potential allies need not entail unthinking acceptance of their actions. Our challenge is to call forth the humanity with each adversary, while preparing for the full range of possible responses."
Desmond Mpilo Tutu, "No Future Without Forgiveness" (essay)
445(6)
"I told them....to go beyond retributive justice to restorative justice, to move on to forgiveness, because without it there was no future."
Student Writing
Susan Voyticky, "Mixed-Up" (essay)
451(2)
"Identity is more than skin deep."
Jill Ho, "Affirmative Action: Perspectives from a Model Minority" (essay)
453(7)
"Despite my pride in my identity, being Asian American has forced me to deal with situations that have made me feel excluded from both Asian and American cultures."
Topics for Research and Writing
457(2)
8 POP DREAMS 459(65)
Research Writing
460(4)
Finding a Topic
Timetable and Process
Your Voice and the Voices of Your Sources
Purpose and Structure
Language and Style
The Computer as a Research Partner
Thematic Introduction
464(1)
Readings
Louise Erdrich, "Dear John Wayne" (poem)
465(3)
"We get into the car...speechless and small as people are when the movie is done."
Anthony Pratkanis and Elliot Aronson, "Pictures in Our Heads" (essay)
468(6)
"To what extent do the pictures we see on television and in other mass media influence how we see the world and set the agenda for what we view as most important in our lives?"
Alissa Quart, "Branded" (essay)
474(10)
"The reliance on brands has shifted: brands have infiltrated preteens and adolescents' inner lives."
Carlin Flora, "Seeing by Starlight" (essay)
484(6)
"It's easy to blame the media....But the real celebrity spinmeister is our own mind, which tricks us into believing the stars are our lovers and our social intimates."
Sissela Bok, "Aggression: The Impact of Media Violence" (essay)
490(7)
"Through the magnifying power of this lens, their everyday life becomes suffused by images of shootings, family violence, gang warfare, kidnappings, and everything else that contributes to violence in our society."
Jonathan L. Freedman, "Evaluating the Research on Violent Video Games" (essay)
497(12)
"When the experimenters choose a violent game, they may be giving the message that they approve of such games and might therefore approve of or even expect the subjects to behave violently or aggressively."
Mark Cochrane, "Moral Abdication?" (essay)
509(6)
"Mathers belongs to a lineage whose work has always occupied the uneasy border between subversion and hate, and whose imaginative freedom has always needed protection."
Student Writing
Anne Ritchie, "Creativity, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll"
515(10)
"Rather than enhancing creativity, as drugs are thought to do, they most often impede it."
Topics for Research and Writing
523(1)
9 VOYAGES IN SPIRITUALITY 524(48)
Creativity, Problem Solving, and Synthesis
525(4)
Habit Versus Risk
Reason Versus Intuition
Developing Self-Confidence: Learning to Trust Your Own Processes
Evaluation and Application
Synthesis
Thematic Introduction
529(1)
Readings
Emily Dickinson, "#501, This World Is Not Conclusion" (poem)
530(2)
"Narcotics cannot still the Tooth That nibbles at the soul—"
Annie Dillard, "A Field of Silence" (essay)
532(4)
"My impression now of those fields is of thousands of spirits—spirits trapped, perhaps, by my refusal to call them more fully, or by the paralysis of my own spirit at that time—"
Jane Goodall, "In the Forests of Gombe" (essay)
536(7)
"It seemed to me, as I struggled afterward to recall the experience, that self was utterly absent: I and the chimpanzees, the earth and trees and air, seemed to merge, to become one with the spirit power of life itself."
Martin Luther King Jr., "I Have a Dream" (essay)
543(5)
"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed, 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."'
Jim Wallis, "Taking Back the Faith" (essay)
548(4)
"Powerful nations dangerously claim to 'rid the world of evil,' but often do enormous harm in their self-appointed vocation to do so."
Noah Levine, "Death Is Not the End My Friend" (essay)
552(6)
"I put one foot in front of the other and showed up for my life's work, using the grief and even the feelings of guilt and confusion over having escaped from a life of addiction and crime as the basis of my teachings."
Linda Hogan, "The Voyagers" (essay)
558(6)
"That night we were small, my mother and I, and we were innocent. We were children of the universe. In the gas of dust and life, we are voyagers."
Student Writing
Norman Yeung Bik Chung, "A Faithful Taoist"
564(3)
"It is not important whether the 'ghost painting' in the temple was the result of those who worked there or not. What is important is that those few words had strengthened my father's willpower to live and to seek the medical care he needed."
Karen Methot-Chun, "Living Spirituality"
567(4)
"Spirituality also can be defined as the way in which we discover our lives....Some believe that spirituality is the act of living itself:"
Topics for Research and Writing
571(1)
Credits 572(3)
Index 575


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