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Early Childhood Language Arts,9780205490462
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Early Childhood Language Arts

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780205490462

ISBN10:
0205490468
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2011
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $99.00

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This is the 5th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2011.
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Summary

"Todayrs"s society is becoming increasingly diverse and future teachers must be prepared for the populations they will serve. However, it is not just the inclusion of these topics that hellip; [is a] strength of this text. The author approaches these topics with such a positive tone, particularly through the examples provided of specific children or families, that the reader could see working with these populations as a potential joy and positive aspect of teaching." Rebecca Edmiaston, University of Northern Iowa Now in its fourth edition, Early Childhood Language Arts offers a more comprehensive look at early childhood literacy education than any other text, integrating all aspects of language arts: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In every chapter, renowned author Mary Jalongo presents research-based teaching strategies, emphasizes collaboration with families and professionals in other fields to support literacy growth, and underscores the importance of working effectively with diverse groups of language learners. Marginal notes throughout address four different aspects of language arts instruction: bilingual education, brain and language, infant and toddler research, and group investigation. In response to the call for evidence-based reading instruction, the fourth edition equips early childhood educators with a repertoire of evidence-based approaches to instruction with research-based literacy strategies in every chapter. A total of thirty-nine strategies are discussed in terms of three adaptations: for English language learners, for children who are struggling with literacy, and for children with special needs, including gifted students. Three new chapters provide greater depth and breadth of coverage on early literacy with print: Chapter 6 on expository and narrative texts, Chapter 7 on emergent reading, and Chapter 8 on early and independent reading.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART ONE Language Learning in Context
Appreciating Diversity in Children's Language
1(26)
Fact File on Diversity
1(2)
What Is the Cutural Context and Home Literacy Environment?
3(3)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
6(2)
Contributions and Consequences
8(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Diversity in the Language Arts
8(1)
Meeting the Needs of Children with Language Differences
9(4)
Overview of Children's Language Differences
13(1)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
14(4)
Classroom Activities to Support Diverse Language Learners
18(4)
Conclusion
22(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
22(5)
Story Retelling Using Technology
22(4)
Using Interactive Books with Children with Low Book Interest
26(1)
Dolch Sight Word List
26(1)
Optimizing Every Child's Language Growth through Family Literacy
27(22)
Fact File on Families
27(2)
What Is Family and Community Engagement in Schools?
29(1)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
30(1)
Contributions and Consequences
30(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: The National PTA Standards
31(1)
Overview of Parents' and Families' Contributions to Early Literacy
32(5)
Engaging Families as Observers of Children
34(1)
Engaging Families as Environment Arrangers
35(1)
Engaging Families as Interactors
35(1)
Engaging Families as Motivators and Encouragers
36(1)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
37(4)
Classroom Activities to Support Family Literacy
41(3)
Conclusion
44(2)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
46(3)
Providing Access to Books through Pediatricians
46(1)
Training Parents and Families as Reading Partners
46(1)
Building Vocabulary by Reading Aloud
47(2)
PART TWO Oral Language
Understanding Language Development in Early Childhood
49(27)
Fact File on Language Development
49(2)
What Is Language?
51(1)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
52(1)
Contributions and Consequences
53(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct
54(1)
How Do Children Learn to Communicate?
54(3)
Components of Language
57(4)
Pragmatics
58(1)
Semantics
59(1)
Syntax
59(1)
Graphophonics
60(1)
Overview of Language Development
61(2)
Theories of Language Acquisition
63(8)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
71(1)
Classroom Activities to Support Language Development
72(1)
Conclusion
73(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
73(3)
Having Phonological Awareness and Learning to Recognize Rhymes
73(1)
Using Environmental Print
74(1)
Using Children's Names to Foster Language Development
75(1)
Helping Young Children Become Better Listeners
76(24)
Fact File on Listening
76(2)
What Is Effective Listening?
78(1)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
79(1)
Contributions and Consequences
80(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: When to Make Referrals for Hearing Assessment
80(1)
Why Is Listening Important?
81(2)
Developmental Overview of Children's Listening Abilities
83(5)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
88(3)
Classroom Activities to Support Listening
91(3)
Conclusion
94(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
95(5)
Audiobooks
95(3)
Word Families: Onsets and Rimes
98(1)
Directed Listening/Thinking Activity (DLTA) and Discussion Web
99(1)
Supporting the Speaking Abilities of the Very Young
100(28)
Fact File on Speaking
100(2)
What Is a Positive Talk Environment?
102(3)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
105(1)
Contributions and Consequences
106(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Bilingual Education
106(1)
How Do Young Children Use Speech?
106(3)
Developmental Overview of Children's Speech
109(8)
Communicative and Noncommunicative Speech
109(4)
Understanding Children's Language Problems
113(4)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
117(2)
Classroom Activities to Develop Children's Speaking
119(6)
Conclusion
125(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
125(3)
K-W-L Plus
125(1)
Speech-to-Text Software
126(1)
Electronic Talking Books
127(1)
Using Narrative and Expository Texts to Foster Growth in Literacy
128(27)
Fact File on Narrative and Expository Texts
128(1)
What Are Narrative and Expository Texts?
129(7)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
136(1)
Contributions and Consequences
137(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Mastering Narrative and Expository Texts
137(1)
Overview of Children's Narrative and Expository Styles
138(4)
Narrative Text
138(3)
Expository Text
141(1)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
142(2)
Classroom Activities to Support Children's Mastery of Narrative and Expository Texts
144(5)
Conclusion
149(3)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
152(3)
Wordless Books
152(1)
Reading Information Books Aloud
153(1)
Captioned Video
153(2)
PART THREE Literacy with Print
Fostering Growth in Emergent Literacy
155(24)
Fact File on Emergent Literacy
155(2)
What Is Emergent Literacy?
157(2)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
159(1)
Contributions and Consequences
159(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Language-Learning Disabilities in Young Children
160(1)
Developmental Overview of Emergent Reading
161(7)
Understanding What a Book Is
161(2)
Understanding How a Book Works
163(1)
Becoming a Listener and a Participant
163(2)
Inventing Stories to Go with Illustrations
165(3)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
168(2)
Classroom Activities to Support Emergent Reading
170(3)
Conclusion
173(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
174(2)
``Word Walls''
174(1)
``Talking'' Reading Support Programs
174(1)
The Shared Book Experience and Repeated Reading
175(1)
Appendix 7.1
176(3)
Supporting Early and Independent Reading with Anita Iaquinta
179(34)
Fact File on Early and Independent Reading
179(2)
What Is Early and Independent Reading?
181(4)
What Children Need to Become Readers
184(1)
Reading Difficulties
185(1)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
185(1)
Contributions and Consequences
186(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Language-Learning Disabilities
186(1)
Developmental Overview of Early and Independent Reading
187(4)
Focus on Print, Meaning, and Story Knowledge
187(1)
Focus on Word Configuration and Sound/Symbol Correspondence
187(2)
Coordinating Knowledge of Print and Story
189(2)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
191(3)
Classroom Activities to Support Early and Independent Reading
194(7)
Conclusion
201(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
201(4)
Free Voluntary Reading and ``Summer Slump''
201(2)
Readers' Theater
203(1)
Guided Reading
203(2)
Appendix 8.1
205(8)
Leading Young Children to Literature
213(28)
Fact File on Children's Literature
213(2)
What Is Literature for Young Children?
215(1)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
216(1)
Contributions and Consequences
216(2)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Evaluation Questions for Picture Books
218(1)
Overview of Children's Literature
219(10)
Reasons for Using Literature
219(1)
Ways of Using Literature
220(9)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
229(1)
Classroom Activities to Support Responses to Literature
230(5)
Conclusion
235(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
235(6)
Reading with Companion Animals
235(4)
Bilingual Children's Literature and Second-Language Acquisition
239(1)
Literature Circles and Book Discussions
240(1)
PART FOUR Written Language and Symbol Systems
Facilitating Expression through Drawing and Writing
241(33)
Fact File on Drawing and Writing
241(2)
Relationship between Drawing and Writing
243(7)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
250(1)
Contributions and Consequences
250(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: The Process Approach to Writing
251(1)
Developmental Overview of Children's Drawing and Writing
251(5)
Prealphabetic Writing and Nonrepresentational Drawing
251(1)
Alphabetic Writing and Representational Drawing
252(4)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
256(3)
Classroom Activities to Support Children's Drawing and Writing
259(7)
Conclusion
266(4)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
270(4)
``Talking'' Drawings
270(1)
Multimedia Composing
271(2)
Gender Influences on Children's Drawing and Writing
273(1)
Understanding Media Influences and Applying Technology
274(21)
Fact File on Media Influences and Technology
274(2)
What Are the Mass Media?
276(3)
What Is Media Literacy?
279(4)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
283(1)
Contributions and Consequences
283(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: The NAEYC on Technology in Early Childhood Programs
284(1)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
284(4)
Classroom Activities to Support Media Awareness and Application of Technology
288(3)
Conclusion
291(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
292(3)
Educational Television and Literacy
292(1)
Online Publishing of Children's Drawing and Writing
293(1)
Internet-Based Communication and E-Pals
294(1)
PART FIVE The Teacher of Language Arts
Designing and Managing a Language Arts Program
295(31)
Fact File on Language Arts Programs
295(2)
What Is a Balanced Curriculum?
297(3)
Collaborating with Families and Professionals
300(1)
Contributions and Consequences
301(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Development: High-Quality Early Literacy Programs
302(2)
Overview of How Early Childhood Educators Shape the Curriculum
304(11)
Reflecting on a Philosophy
304(2)
Arranging the Physical Environment
306(4)
Grouping for Instruction
310(1)
Managing Behavior
310(1)
Designing Learning Experiences
310(5)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
315(3)
Classroom Activities to Support Diverse Language Learners
318(4)
Conclusion
322(1)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
322(4)
Design Features of Literacy Environments
322(1)
Effective Learning Centers
323(1)
Reading Recovery and Tutorial Programs
324(2)
Documenting Children's Progress in the Language Arts
326(23)
Fact File on Assessment
326(2)
What Is Assessment?
328(4)
Collaboration with Families and Professionals
332(1)
Contributions and Consequences
332(1)
Standards to Guide Professional Practice: Assessment Principles and Federal Legislation
332(1)
Overview of Assessment
333(8)
Traditional Testing
334(6)
Evaluating Language Arts Programs
340(1)
Teacher Concerns and Basic Strategies
341(3)
Observation
341(2)
Portfolios
343(1)
Documentation
344(1)
Conclusion
344(2)
Research-Based Literacy Strategies
346(3)
Assessing Reading Attitudes, Interests, and Motivation
346(1)
Electronic Literacy Assessment, Feedback, and Management
347(1)
Text-to-Speech Software
347(2)
References 349(21)
Children's Books and Media 370(3)
Index 373


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