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Econometric Analysis,9780130661890
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Econometric Analysis

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780130661890

ISBN10:
0130661899
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $180.00
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Summary

For a one-year graduate course in Econometrics. This text has two objectives. The first is to introduce students to applied econometrics, including basic techniques in regression analysis and some of the rich variety of models that are used when the linear model proves inadequate or inappropriate. The second is to present students with sufficient theoretical background that they will recognize new variants of the models learned about here as merely natural extensions that fit within a common body of principles. The Fifth Edition features a complete update of techniques and developments, a reorganization of material for improved presentation, and new material and applications.

Table of Contents

Preface xxvii
Introduction
1(6)
The Classical Multiple Linear Regression Model
7(12)
Least Squares
19(22)
Finite-Sample Properties of the Least Squares Estimator
41(24)
Large-Sample Properties of the Least Squares and Instrumental Variables Estimators
65(28)
Inference and Prediction
93(23)
Functional Form and Structural Change
116(32)
Specification Analysis and Model Selection
148(14)
Nonlinear Regression Models
162(29)
Nonspherical Disturbances---The Generalized Regression Model
191(24)
Heteroscedasticity
215(35)
Serial Correlation
250(33)
Models for Panel Data
283(56)
Systems of Regression Equations
339(39)
Simultaneous-Equations Models
378(47)
Estimation Frameworks in Econometrics
425(43)
Maximum Likelihood Estimation
468(57)
The Generalized Method of Moments
525(33)
Models with Lagged Variables
558(50)
Time-Series Models
608(55)
Models for Discrete Choice
663(93)
Limited Dependent Variable and Duration Models
756(47)
Appendix A Matrix Algebra 803(42)
Appendix B Probability and Distribution Theory 845(32)
Appendix C Estimation and Inference 877(19)
Appendix D Large Sample Distribution Theory 896(23)
Appendix E Computation and Optimization 919(27)
Appendix F Data Sets Used in Applications 946(7)
Appendix G Statistical Tables 953(6)
References 959(36)
Author Index 995(7)
Subject Index 1002

Excerpts

THE FIFTH EDITION OF ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS Econometric Analysisis intended for a one-year graduate course in econometrics for social scientists. The prerequisites for this course should include calculus, mathematical statistics, and an introduction to econometrics at the level of, say,Gujarati's Basic Econometrics(McGraw-Hill, 1995) or Wooldridge'sIntroductory Econometrics: A Modern ApproachSouth-Western (2000). Self-contained (for our purposes) summaries of the matrix algebra, mathematical statistics, and statistical theory used later in the book are given in Appendices A through D. Appendix E contains a description of numerical methods that will be useful to practicing econometricians. The formal presentation of econometrics begins with discussion of a fundamental pillar, the linear multiple regression model, in Chapters 2 through 8. Chapters 9 through 15 present familiar extensions of the single linear equation model, including nonlinear regression, panel data models, the generalized regression model, and systems of equations. The linear model is usually not the sole technique used in most of the contemporary literature. In view of this, the (expanding) second half of this book is devoted to topics that will extend the linear regression model in many directions. Chapters 16 through 18 present the techniques and underlying theory of estimation in econometrics, including GMM and maximum likelihood estimation methods and simulation based techniques. We end in the last four chapters, 19 through 22, with discussions of current topics in applied econometrics, including time-series analysis and the analysis of discrete choice and limited dependent variable models. This book has two objectives. The first is to introduce students toapplied econometrics,including basic techniques in regression analysis and some of the rich variety of models that are used when the linear model proves inadequate or inappropriate. The second is to present students with sufficienttheoretical backgroundthat they will recognize new variants of the models learned about here as merely natural extensions that fit within a common body of principles. Thus, I have spent what might seem to be a large amount of effort explaining the mechanics of GMM estimation, nonlinear least squares, and maximum likelihood estimation and GARCH models. To meet the second objective, this book also contains a fair amount of theoretical material, such as that on maximum likelihood estimation and on asymptotic results for regression models. Modern software has made complicated modeling very easy to do, and an understanding of the underlying theory is important. I had several purposes in undertaking this revision. As in the past, readers continue to send me interesting ideas for my "next edition." It is impossible to use them all, of course. Because the five volumes of theHandbook of Econometricsand two of theHandbook of Applied Econometricsalready run to over 4,000 pages, it is also unnecessary. Nonetheless, this revision is appropriate for several reasons. First, there are new and interesting developments in the field, particularly in the areas of microeconometrics (panel data, models for discrete choice) and, of course, in time series, which continues its rapid development. Second, I have taken the opportunity to continue fine-tuning the text as the experience and shared wisdom of my readers accumulates in my files. For this revision, that adjustment has entailed a substantial rearrangement of the material--the main purpose of that was to allow me to add the new material in a more compact and orderly way than I could have with the table of contents in the 4th edition. The 15terature in econometrics has continued to evolve, and my third objective is to grow with it. This purpose is inherently difficult to accomplish in a textbook. Most of the literature is written by professionals for other professionals,


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