9780415608923

Economic Necessity, Political Contingency and the Limits of Post-Marxism

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780415608923

  • ISBN10:

    0415608929

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 3/8/2018
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

Post-Marxism emerged in the 1970s and 80s as a way to retain certain insights from Marxism while disposing of its indefensible and destructive elements, especially the tendency to reduce all social change to the economic base. This book offers a new and critical reading of post-Marxism, arguing that whilst it convincinly deconstructs the prevalent economism in Marxism as the necessary logic of social reproduction, it nonetheless still retains an ontology of a closed capitalist economy, inhabited by a set of necessary logics.Through a careful symptomatic reading of the works of influential post-Marxian thinkers, Ernesto Laclau and Étienne Balibar, the book argues that while post-Marxian positions have constructed a theory of social contingency, it has failed in different ways to dislodge the constitution of class and capitalist reproduction from essentialist narratives.

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