CART

(0) items

The Economics of Women, Men, and Work,9780131851542
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

The Economics of Women, Men, and Work

by ; ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131851542

ISBN10:
0131851543
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2010
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Related Products


  • The Economics of Women, Men and Work
    The Economics of Women, Men and Work
  • The Economics of Women, Men, and Work
    The Economics of Women, Men, and Work
  • The Economics of Women, Men, and Work
    The Economics of Women, Men, and Work





Summary

"The Economics of Women, Men, and Work, Fifth Edition, defines the study of women, men, and work in the labor market and the household. Blau, Ferber, and Winkler comprehensively analyzed recent developments in the labor market and their consequences for men and women, to again provide a single volume with the most current summary and synthesis of research and data on gender issues in the labor market."--BOOK JACKET.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
Introduction
1(12)
What Economics Is About
3(1)
Uses of Economic Theory
4(1)
The Scope of Economics
5(1)
Individuals, Families, and Households
6(1)
A Note on Terminology
7(1)
Outline of the Book
7(1)
Appendix: A Review of Supply and Demand in the Labor Market
8(4)
Questions for Review and Discussion
12(1)
Women and Men: Changing Roles in a Changing Economy
13(22)
The Nature of Males and Females
14(1)
The Role of Sociobiology in Explaining Gender Differences
15(3)
Factors Influencing Women's Relative Status
18(1)
Women's Roles and Economic Development
19(2)
The U.S. Experience
21(12)
The Preindustrial Period
21(1)
Industrialization
22(1)
Industrialization and the Evolution of the Family
23(5)
Women in the Labor Market
28(5)
Conclusion
33(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
34(1)
Suggested Readings
34(1)
The Family as an Economic Unit
35(50)
The Simple Neoclassical Model: Specialization and Exchange
37(5)
Comparative Advantage
37(1)
Specialization and Exchange: Numerical Examples
38(2)
Gains to Specialization and Exchange
40(2)
Other Advantages of Families
42(1)
Economies of Scale
42(1)
Public Goods
42(1)
Externalities in Consumption
42(1)
Marriage-Specific Investments
43(1)
Risk Pooling
43(1)
Institutional Advantages
43(1)
Disadvantages of Specialization
43(6)
Sharing of Housework
44(1)
Life Cycle Changes
45(1)
Costs of Interdependence
45(1)
Tastes and Bargaining Power
46(2)
Domestic Violence
48(1)
Disadvantages of Specialization: A Summary
49(1)
Transaction Cost and Bargaining Approaches
49(4)
Marxist and Radical Feminist Views of the Family
53(2)
Nonmarket Work
55(15)
Housework
56(7)
Volunteer Work
63(3)
Estimating the Value of Nonmarket Production
66(4)
The American Family in the Twenty-First Century
70(4)
Conclusion
74(1)
Appendix: Specialization and Exchange: A Graphical Analysis
75(8)
Questions for Review and Discussion
83(1)
Suggested Readings
83(2)
The Allocation of Time between the Household and the Labor Market
85(51)
The Labor Force: Some Definitions
86(2)
Trends in Labor Force Participation
88(4)
Trends in Labor Force Attachment
92(3)
Trends in Hours Worked
95(1)
The Labor Supply Decision
96(22)
The Budget Constraint
98(1)
Indifference Curves
99(3)
The Participation Decision
102(2)
The Value of Nonmarket Time (w*)
104(5)
The Value of Market Time (w)
109(4)
The Hours Decision
113(1)
Empirical Evidence on Income and Substitution Effects
113(2)
Economic Conditions
115(1)
Some Applications of the Theory: Taxes, Child Care Costs, and Labor Supply
116(2)
Analyzing Trends in Women's Participation: An Overview
118(4)
Factors Influencing the Value of Market Time (w)
118(2)
Factors Influencing the Value of Nonmarket Time (w*)
120(2)
The World War II Experience
122(2)
The Post--World War II Baby Boom
124(1)
The 1960s to the 1980s: Increased Participation of Married Mothers
125(2)
The 1990s and Early 2000s: Diverging Participation Trends for Married and Single Mothers
127(1)
Analyzing Trends in Men's Participation
128(1)
Black and White Participation Differentials: A Closer Look
129(3)
Conclusion
132
Appendix: The Income and Substitution Effects: A Closer Look
131(3)
Questions for Review and Discussion
134(1)
Suggested Readings
134(2)
Differences in Occupations and Earnings: Overview
136(22)
Occupational Differences
137(7)
Occupational Segregation
141(2)
Hierarchies Within Occupations
143(1)
Evaluating the Extent of Occupational Segregation
143(1)
Trends in Occupational Segregation
144(3)
Female-Male Earnings Ratio
147(9)
Conclusion
156(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
157(1)
Differences in Occupations and Earnings: The Human Capital Model
158(44)
What Is Human Capital?
160(1)
Gender Differences in Educational Attainment
161(4)
The Educational Investment Decision
165(5)
Education and Productivity
170(1)
Gender Differences in Educational Investment Decisions: The Human Capital Analysis
171(3)
Expected Work Life
171(3)
Gender Differences in Educational Investment Decisions: Other Factors
174(8)
Socialization
174(3)
Gender-Appropriate Traits and Competencies
177(2)
Biased Evaluations
179(1)
Discrimination by Educational Institutions
179(1)
Subtle Barriers
180(2)
Policy Issue: The Role of Government in Combating Discrimination in Educational Institutions
182(1)
Explaining Women's Rising Educational Attainment
183(1)
On-the-Job Training
184(1)
Gender Differences in Labor Market Experience
185(1)
The On-the-Job Training Investment Decision
186(3)
General Training
186(1)
Firm-Specific Training
187(2)
Experience and Productivity
189(1)
Gender Differences in Training Investment Decisions
190(3)
Expected Work Life
190(2)
Discrimination
192(1)
Occupations and Earnings
193(1)
Other Supply-Side Factors
194(2)
The Human Capital Explanation: An Assessment
196(4)
Conclusion
200(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
200(1)
Suggested Readings
201(1)
Differences in Occupations and Earnings: The Role of Labor Market Discrimination
202(54)
Labor Market Discrimination: A Definition
203(1)
Empirical Evidence of Labor Market Discrimination
204(14)
Earnings Differences
204(7)
Occupational Differences
211(7)
Models of Labor Market Discrimination
218(16)
Tastes for Discrimination
218(8)
Statistical Discrimination
226(2)
The Overcrowding Model
228(3)
Institutional Models
231(2)
Feedback Effects
233(1)
Policy Issue: The Government and Equal Employment Opportunity
234(15)
Equal Employment Opportunity Laws and Regulations
235(5)
Effectiveness of the Government's Antidiscrimination Effort
240(2)
Affirmative Action
242(3)
Comparable Worth
245(4)
Conclusion
249(1)
Appendix: Regression Analysis and Empirical Estimates of Labor Market Discrimination
250(4)
Questions for Review and Discussion
254(1)
Suggested Readings
255(1)
Recent Developments in the Labor Market: Their Impact on Women and Men
256(33)
Trends in Female and Male Wages
257(2)
The Declining Gender Pay Gap
259(6)
Determinants of Trends in the Gender Pay Gap
259(1)
Empirical Results for the 1980s
260(4)
Empirical Results for the 1990s
264(1)
The Rising Payoff to Education
265(2)
Changing Labor Market Dynamics
267(7)
The High-Churning U.S. Labor Market
267(1)
Unemployment
268(2)
Other Indicators of Employment Problems
270(2)
Trends in the Gender Difference in Unemployment
272(1)
Future Labor Market Prospects
273(1)
The Rise of the Nonstandard Workforce
274(4)
Definition and Characteristics of the Nonstandard Workforce
274(2)
Explanations Behind the Rise of Nonstandard Workers
276(1)
Consequences for Workers and Their Families
277(1)
The Growth in Women's Self-Employment
278(3)
The Changing Face of Labor Unions
281(5)
Trends in Labor Union Membership
281(1)
Benefits of Union Membership for Workers and the Impact of Deunionization
282(1)
Reasons for the Historic Underrepresentation of Women in Unions
283(1)
The Glass Ceiling in Union Leadership
284(1)
Prospects for Women in Unions
285(1)
Conclusion
286(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
287(1)
Suggested Readings
287(2)
Changing Work Roles and the Family
289(37)
Economic Explanations for Family Formation
290(20)
Marriage
290(4)
Divorce
294(5)
Cohabitation: Opposite-Sex, Unmarried Couples
299(2)
Cohabitation: Gay and Lesbian Couples
301(2)
Fertility
303(7)
Changing Family Structure and Economic Well-Being
310(13)
Dual-Earner Families
310(4)
Maternal Employment and Children's Outcomes
314(2)
Single-Parent Families
316(6)
Family Structure and Children's Outcomes
322(1)
Conclusion
323(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
324(1)
Suggested Readings
324(2)
Policies Affecting Paid Work and the Family
326(45)
Policies to Alleviate Poverty
326(14)
AFDC: Our Former Welfare Program
327(2)
The Iron Triangle of Welfare
329(1)
Employment Strategies
330(1)
TANF: Our Current Welfare Program
331(5)
The Earned Income Tax Credit
336(2)
Child Support Enforcement
338(2)
Taxes, Specialization, and Marriage
340(8)
Income Taxation Policy
341(4)
The Social Security System
345(3)
The Competing Demands of Work and Family
348(2)
Who Is Responsible for Children?
350(2)
Family-Friendly Policies
352(15)
Family Leave
353(3)
Child Care
356(6)
Alternative Work Schedules
362(2)
Flexible Benefits
364(1)
Policies to Assist Couples
364(3)
Conclusion
367(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
368(1)
Suggested Readings
369(2)
Gender Differences in Other Countries
371(50)
The Economic Status of the World's Women: Overview
372(14)
Labor Force Participation
372(5)
Occupations
377(1)
Earnings
378(1)
Educational Attainment
379(1)
Fertility
380(2)
Housework
382(1)
Women's Role in Government and Their Standing Before the Law
383(1)
Interpretations and Implications
383(3)
A Comparison of the United States to Other Economically Advanced Countries
386(17)
Labor Force Participation
389(1)
Occupations
390(3)
The Gender-Wage Gap
393(5)
Demographic Trends
398(4)
Housework
402(1)
Summary on Economically Advanced Countries
402(1)
Developing Countries
403(11)
Education as the Pathway to Empowerment
403(2)
Fertility and Population Control
405(3)
Child Labor
408(2)
Microcredit for Women: Lifeline or Mirage?
410(3)
Summary on Women in Developing Countries
413(1)
Countries of the Former Soviet Bloc
414(3)
Conclusion
417(1)
Questions for Review and Discussion
417(1)
Suggested Readings
418(3)
Author Index 421(10)
Subject Index 431


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...