9780133827101

Education of the Gifted and Talented

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780133827101

  • ISBN10:

    0133827100

  • Edition: 7th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2017-03-08
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

A best-selling, comprehensive guide to best practices in gifted education.


Practical strategies and the latest research on critical topics and on best practices make Education of the Gifted and Talented an indispensable resource for those who work or will work with gifted students. The content is supported and enhanced by the inclusion of practical strategies that can be implemented in the classroom, case studies that help teachers identify student needs, and summaries of research on effective programs. Emphasis is placed on pedagogy and on social-emotional needs, and the title includes a heightened awareness of less visible sub-groups within gifted populations. The Seventh Edition features new directions, new programs, thoroughly updated topics, and current research to keep readers on top of the latest advances in the field.


Author Biography

Dr. Rimm was a longtime contributor to NBC’s Today Show, hosted Family Talk on public radio nationally, and served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children. She has received the prestigious Anne F. Isaacs, Robert Rossmiller and Palmarium awards for her lifetime contributions to gifted children.


Del Siegle is a professor in gifted and talented education and Director of the National Center for Research on Gifted Education (NCRGE) at the University of Connecticut. NCRGE is the only federally funded national research center on gifted education. He is a past president of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), past president of the Montana Association of Gifted and Talented Education (Montana AGATE), past chair of the Research on Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent SIG of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and former Head of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut. Along with D. Betsy McCoach, he was co-editor of Gifted Child Quarterly (GCQ) and the Journal of Advanced Academics (JOAA). He writes a technology column for Gifted Child Today. In addition to being a co-author of Education of the Gifted and Talented, he is also author of The Underachieving Gifted Child: Recognizing, Understanding, and Reversing Underachievement. Prior to becoming a professor, Dr. Siegle worked with gifted and talented students in Montana.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Gifted Education: Matching Instruction with Needs 1

Chapter 2 Characteristics of Gifted Students 23

Chapter 3 Identifying Gifted and Talented Students 40

Chapter 4 Program Planning 72

Chapter 5 Acceleration 95

Chapter 6 Grouping, Differentiation, and Enrichment 116

Chapter 7 Curriculum Models 142

Chapter 8 Creativity I: The Creative Person, Creative Process, and Creative

Dramatics 163

Chapter 9 Creativity II: Teaching for Creative Growth 177

Chapter 10 Teaching Thinking Skills 197

Chapter 11 Leadership, Affective Learning, and Character Education 221

Chapter 12 Underachievement: Identification and Reversal 235

Chapter 13 Cultural Diversity and Economic Disadvantage: The Invisible Gifted 264

Chapter 14 Gifted Girls, Gifted Boys 289

Chapter 15 Gifted Children with Disabilities 308

Chapter 16 Parenting the Gifted Child 328

Chapter 17 Understanding and Counseling Gifted Students 349

Chapter 18 Program Evaluation 374


Preface v

Chapter 1 Gifted Education: Matching Instruction with Needs 1

History of Giftedness and Gifted Education 3

Contemporary History of Gifted Education 4

National Center for Research on Gifted Education 9

Definitions of Giftedness 11

Explanations and Interpretations of Giftedness and Intelligence 13

    Summary 21


Chapter 2 Characteristics of Gifted Students 23

The Terman Studies 23

Traits of Intellectually Gifted Children 26

Affective Characteristics 27

Characteristics of the Creatively Gifted 30

Characteristics of Historically Eminent Persons 31

Characteristics of Teachers of the Gifted 36

    Summary 38


Chapter 3 Identifying Gifted and Talented Students 40

Thoughts and Issues in Identification 41

National Report on Identification 44

Identification Methods 44

Assessment of Gardner’s Eight Intelligences 55

Triarchic Abilities Test 55

A Multidimensional Culture-Fair Assessment Strategy 56

Talent Pool Identification Plan: Renzulli 56

Identifying Gifted Preschoolers 57

Identifying Gifted Secondary Students 57

Recommendations from the National Report on Identification and NRC/GT 59

Considering the Goals of Identification 62

    Summary 62 • Appendix 3.1: NAGC Position Statement 64 • Appendix 3.2: Spanish

    Edition of Rimm’s (1976) GIFT Creativity Inventory 65 • Appendix 3.3: Teacher

    Nomination Form 66 • Appendix 3.4: Teacher Nomination Form 67 • Appendix 3.5:

    Sample Parent Nomination Form 68 • Appendix 3.6: Student Product Assessment

    Form 69 • Appendix 3.7: Rubrics for Verbal and Problem-Solving Tasks 70

    • Appendix 3.8: Scales for Rating Behavioral Characteristics of Superior Students 71


Chapter 4 Program Planning 72

Main Components of Program Planning 73

Program Planning: Sixteen Areas 74

The View from the School Board 86

Perspectives of Other Teachers 89

Curriculum Considerations 89

Legal Issues in Gifted Education 90

    Summary 91 • Appendix 4.1: Ideas for Statements of Philosophy, Rationale, and

    Objectives 92 • Appendix 4.2: National Standards for Preparation of Teachers of the

    Gifted 93


Chapter 5 Acceleration 95

Acceleration versus Enrichment 97

A Nation Deceived and a Nation Empowered—Definitive Research on Acceleration 98

Types of Acceleration 100

Grade Skipping 104

Subject Skipping and Acceleration 106

Early Admission to Middle or Senior High School 107

Credit by Examination 107

College Courses in High School 107

Advanced Placement 108

Distance Learning 108

Telescoped Programs 108

Early Admission to College 109

Residential High Schools 109

International Baccalaureate Programs 110

Talent Search Programs 111

    Summary 113 • Appendix 5.1: College Board Offices 114 • Appendix 5.2: Talent

    Search and Elementary Talent Search Programs 114


Chapter 6 Grouping, Differentiation, and Enrichment 116

Grouping Options: Bringing Gifted Students Together 117

Differentiation 123

Enrichment 127

Independent Study, Research, and Art Projects 128

Learning Centers 130

Field Trips 130

Saturday Programs 130

Summer Programs 131

Mentors and Mentorships 132

Junior Great Books 133

Competitions 134

Technology and the Gifted 136

Comments on Grouping, Differentiation, and Enrichment 138

    Summary 138 • Appendix 6.1: Places That Publish Student Work 140


Chapter 7 Curriculum Models 142

Schoolwide Enrichment Model: Renzulli and Reis 143

Autonomous Learner Model: Betts 148

Advanced Academic Program Development Model: Peters, Matthews, McBee, and

McCoach 149

Purdue Three-Stage Enrichment Model: Feldhusen et al. 150

Parallel Curriculum Model: Tomlinson, Kaplan, Renzulli, Purcell, Leppien, and Burns 152

Multiple Menu Model: Renzulli 154

Integrated Curriculum Model: VanTassel-Baska 156

Mentoring Mathematical Minds Model: Gavin et al. 157

The Grid: Constructing Differentiated Curriculum for the Gifted: Kaplan 158

CLEAR Model: Callahan et al. 159

Comment 161

    Summary 161


Chapter 8 Creativity I: The Creative Person, Creative Process, and Creative Dramatics 163

Theories of Creativity 163

Levels of Creativity 165

Creative Persons 166

Creative Abilities 168

The Creative Process 169

The Creative Process as a Change in Perception 172

Creative Dramatics 172

    Summary 175


Chapter 9 Creativity II: Teaching for Creative Growth 177

Can Creativity Be Taught? 177

Goals of Creativity Training 178

Creativity Consciousness, Creative Attitudes, and Creative Personality Traits 178

Understanding the Topic of Creativity 180

Strengthening Creative Abilities 182

Personal Creative Thinking Techniques 184

Standard Creative Thinking Techniques 186

Involving Students in Creative Activities 193

Creative Teaching and Learning 194

    Summary 195


Chapter 10 Teaching Thinking Skills 197

Issues 198

Indirect Teaching, Direct Teaching, and Metacognition 199

Types of Thinking Skills 201

Critical Thinking 203

Models, Programs, and Exercises for Teaching Thinking Skills 204

Philosophy for Children: Lipman 211

Talents Unlimited 212

Instrumental Enrichment: Feuerstein 212

Critical Thinking Books and Technology 214

Involving Parents as Partners in Teaching Thinking Skills 217

Obstacles to Effective Thinking 218

Selecting Thinking-Skills Exercises and Materials 218

    Summary 219


Chapter 11 Leadership, Affective Learning, and Character Education 221

Leadership 222

Leadership Definitions: Traits, Characteristics, and Skills 222

Leadership Training 223

Affective Learning 226

Self-Concept 226

Moral Development: The Kohlberg Model 228

Materials and Strategies for Encouraging Affective Growth 231

The Humanistic Teacher 232

    Summary 233


Chapter 12 Underachievement: Identification and Reversal 235

Definition and Identification of Underachievement 236

Characteristics of Underachieving Gifted Children 240

Etiologies of Underachievement 247

Family Etiology 247

School Etiology 252

Reversal of Underachievement 256

Summary 262

Chapter 13 Cultural Diversity and Economic Disadvantage: The Invisible Gifted 264

Legislation 265

Special Needs 265

Factors Related to Success for Disadvantaged Youth 267

Identification 269

Programming for Gifted Students Who are Culturally Different 276

Gifted Programming in Rural Areas 284

    Summary 287


Chapter 14 Gifted Girls, Gifted Boys 289

Gifted Girls 289

Historical Background 290

Present Status of Women 291

Gifted Boys 295

Sex Differences or Gender Differences 295

Mathematics Abilities 298

Differences in Expectations, Achievement Orientation, and Aspirations 301

Reversing Gender-Based Underachievement 305

    Summary 306


Chapter 15 Gifted Children with Disabilities 308

Needs of Gifted Students with Disabilities 308

Identification 312

Critical Ingredients of Programs for Gifted Children with Disabilities 319

Reducing Communication Limitations 320

Self-Concept Development 321

High-Level Abstract Thinking Skills 324

Parenting Children with Disabilities 325

    Summary 326


Chapter 16 Parenting the Gifted Child 328

Parenting by Positive Expectations 328

Some Special Parenting Concerns 329

Preschool Children 338

Nontraditional Parenting 341

Parent Support Groups and Advocacy 344

Teaching Teens Self-Advocacy 346

Parents as Teachers—Home Schooling Gifted Children 346

    Summary 347 • Appendix 16.1: National Gifted and Talented Educational

    Organizations 348


Chapter 17 Understanding and Counseling Gifted Students 349

Historical Background 351

Personal and Social Issues 351

Perfectionism 355

Emotional Sensitivity and Overexcitability 357

Gifted and Gay 359

Gifted and Overweight 360

Depression and Suicide 362

Career Guidance and Counseling 363

Strategies for Counseling Gifted Students 365

Stress Management 367

Developing a Counseling Program for Gifted Students 369

Comment 371

    Summary 371 • Appendix 17.1: Recommended Reading for Counselors, Administrators,

    And Teachers 373


Chapter 18 Program Evaluation 374

Why Must Programs Be Evaluated? 374

Evaluation Design: Begin at the Beginning 375

Evaluation Models 375

Complexity of Evaluation and Audience: A Hierarchy 379

Instrument Selection 381

Test Construction 382

Daily Logs 385

Indicators 385

Student Self-Evaluations 385

Performance Contracting 385

Commitment to Evaluation 386

    Summary 386 • Appendix 18.1: Example of a Structured Observation

    Form 387 • Appendix 18.2: Example of a Classroom Observation

    Form 388 • Appendix 18.3: Administrator Survey 391

References 393

Name Index 00

Subject Index 00



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