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Educational Psychology : Windows on Classrooms,9780131724488
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Educational Psychology : Windows on Classrooms

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780131724488

ISBN10:
0131724487
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $160.00

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This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
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Summary

For courses in Introduction to Educational Psychology.Long recognized as very applied and practical, Eggen and Kauchak's Educational Psychology: Windows on Classrooms, seventh edition is now even more applied and concise, giving students exactly what they need to know in the course. The author's hallmark cases remain, in both written and videotape format, to introduce real-world applications in a way that no other text can. Along with expanded applications to diversity (urban, suburban, and rural areas), technology, and a new pedagogical system that completely restructures how information is delivered in the book and will help students really understand what they should be getting out of every single chapter. The text now comes with two new DVDs of video material and an access code for the new Teacher Prep Website that will be automatically shrinkwrapped with all new copies of the text. Educational Psychology: Windows on Classrooms once again truly fulfills the promise of its title, giving students a "window" on the classrooms in which they will someday teach.

Table of Contents

Educational Psychology: Developing a Professional Knowledge Base
2(26)
Educational Psychology and Becoming a Professional
5(2)
Characteristics of Professionalism
5(2)
Professional Knowledge and Learning to Teach
7(8)
Knowledge of Content
9(1)
Pedagogical Content Knowledge
9(2)
General Pedagogical Knowledge
11(1)
Knowledge of Learners and Learning
12(1)
The INTASC Standards: States Respond to the Need for Professional Knowledge
12(1)
Changes in Education: Reform and Accountability
13(1)
Learning Contexts: Teaching and Learning in Urban Environments
14(1)
The Role of Research in Acquiring Knowledge
15(13)
Descriptive Research
16(1)
Correlational Research
17(1)
Experimental Research
18(1)
Action Research
19(2)
Research and the Development of Theory
21(1)
The Use of Case Studies in Educational Psychology
22(6)
Part 1: The Learner
The Development of Cognition and Language
28(32)
What Is Development?
30(4)
Principles of Development
31(1)
The Human Brain and Cognitive Development
31(3)
Piaget's Theory of Intellectual Development
34(11)
The Drive for Equilibrium
34(1)
Organization and Adaptation: The Development of Schemes
34(1)
Factors Influencing Development
35(1)
Stages of Development
36(7)
Putting Piaget's Theory into Perspective
43(2)
A Sociocultural View of Development: The Work of Lev Vygotsky
45(1)
Social Interaction and Development
46(1)
Language and Development
46(6)
Culture and Development
47(1)
The Relationship Between Learning and Development
47(3)
Piaget's and Vygotsky's Views of Knowledge Construction
50(2)
Language Development
52(8)
Theories of Language Acquisition
52(1)
Stages of Language Acquisition
53(2)
Promoting Language Development: Suggestions for Teachers
55(5)
Personal, Social, and Emotional Development
60(34)
Personal Development
62(3)
Heredity
63(1)
Parents and Other Adults
63(1)
Peers
64(1)
Social Development
65(5)
Perspective Taking: Understanding Others' Thoughts and Feelings
65(1)
Social Problem Solving
66(1)
Violence and Aggression in Schools
66(4)
The Development of Identity and Self-Concept
70(10)
Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development
70(2)
The Development of Identity
72(2)
The Development of Self-Concept
74(3)
Ethnic Pride: Promoting Positive Self-Esteem and Ethnic Identity
77(3)
Development of Morality, Social Responsibility, and Self-Control
80(14)
Increased Interest in Moral Education and Development
80(1)
Piaget's Description of Moral Development
81(1)
Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development
81(5)
Emotional Factors in Moral Development
86(2)
Learning Contexts: Promoting Personal, Social, and Moral Development in Urban Environments
88(6)
Group and Individual Differences
94(36)
Intelligence
96(7)
Intelligence: One Trait or Many?
97(3)
Intelligence: Nature Versus Nurture
100(1)
Ability Grouping
100(1)
Learning Styles
101(2)
Socioeconomic Status
103(3)
Influence of SES on Learning
104(1)
SES: Some Cautions and Implications for Teachers
105(1)
Culture
106(11)
Ethnicity
106(1)
Culture and Schooling
106(4)
Language Diversity
110(7)
Gender
117(3)
Differences in the Classroom Behavior of Boys and Girls
118(1)
Gender Stereotypes and Perceptions
118(2)
Students Placed at Risk
120(10)
Resilience
122(8)
Learners with Exceptionalities
130(32)
Changes in the Way Teachers Help Students with Exceptionalities
132(6)
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
132(4)
Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
136(2)
Students with Learning Problems
138(11)
The Labeling Controversy
138(1)
Mental Retardation
138(2)
Learning Disabilities
140(2)
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
142(1)
Behavior Disorders
143(2)
Communication Disorders
145(1)
Visual Disabilities
146(1)
Hearing Disabilities
147(1)
Assessment and Learning: Assessment Trends in Special Education
148(1)
Students Who Are Gifted and Talented
149(4)
Creativity: What Is It?
150(1)
Identifying Students Who Are Gifted and Talented
150(3)
The Teacher's Role in Inclusive Classrooms
153(9)
Identifying Students with Exceptionalities
153(2)
Social Integration and Growth
155(7)
Part 2: Learning
Behaviorism and Social Cognitive Theory
162(36)
Behaviorist Views of Learning
164(15)
What Is Behaviorism?
164(1)
Classical Conditioning
165(3)
Operant Conditioning
168(9)
Putting Behaviorism into Perspective
177(2)
Social Cognitive Theory
179(11)
Comparing Behaviorism and Social Cognitive Theory
180(1)
Modeling
181(1)
Vicarious Learning
182(1)
Nonoccurrence of Expected Consequences
183(1)
Functions of Modeling
184(1)
Processes Involved in Learning from Models
185(1)
Effectiveness of Models
185(1)
Self-Regulation
186(3)
Putting Social Cognitive Theory into Perspective
189(1)
Addressing Diversity: Behaviorism and Social Cognitive Theory
190(8)
Classical Conditioning: Learning to Like and Dislike School
191(1)
Motivating Hesitant Learners
192(1)
Capitalizing on Minority Role Models
192(6)
Cognitive Views of Learning
198(34)
Cognitive Perspectives on Learning
200(4)
Principles of Cognitive Learning Theory
201(1)
A Definition of Learning
202(2)
Memory Stores in Our Information Processing System
204(7)
Sensory Memory
204(1)
Working Memory
204(3)
Long-Term Memory
207(4)
Cognitive Processes in Our Information Processing System
211(9)
Attention: The Beginning of Information Processing
211(1)
Perception: Finding Meaning in Stimuli
212(1)
Rehearsal: Retaining Information Through Repetition
213(1)
Meaningful Encoding: Making Connections in Long-Term Memory
213(5)
Forgetting
218(2)
Metacognition: Knowledge and Control of Cognitive Processes
220(12)
The Development of Metacognition
221(4)
The Impact of Diversity on Information Processing
225(2)
Putting Information Processing into Perspective
227(5)
Constructing Knowledge
232(30)
What Is Constructivism?
234(4)
Cognitive Constructivism
235(1)
Social Constructivism
236(2)
Characteristics of Constructivism
238(3)
Learners Construct Knowledge That Makes Sense to Them
238(1)
New Learning Depends on Current Understanding
238(1)
Social Interaction Facilitates Learning
239(2)
Meaningful Learning Occurs Within Real-World Tasks
241(1)
Outcomes of Knowledge Construction
241(7)
Concepts
241(3)
Schemas
244(1)
Misconceptions and Conceptual Change
244(4)
Implications of Constructivism for Teaching
248(14)
The Teacher's Role in Constructivist Classrooms
248(1)
Suggestions for Classroom Practice
248(4)
Assessment and Learning: The Role of Assessment in Constructivist Classrooms
252(1)
Putting Constructivism Into Perspective
252(4)
Learning Contexts: Constructing Knowledge in Urban Environments
256(6)
Complex Cognitive Processes
262(34)
Problem Solving
265(12)
Well-Defined and Ill-Defined Problems
266(1)
A Problem-Solving Model
267(2)
Expert-Novice Differences in Problem-Solving Ability
269(6)
Problem-Based Learning
275(2)
The Strategic Learner
277(5)
Metacognition: The Foundation of Strategic Learning
277(1)
Study Strategies
278(4)
Critical Thinking
282(5)
The Challenge of Critical Thinking
283(1)
Elements of Critical Thinking
284(3)
Transfer of Learning
287(9)
General and Specific Transfer
288(1)
Factors Affecting the Transfer of Learning
288(8)
Part 3: Classroom Processes
Theories of Motivation
296(38)
What Is Motivation?
298(3)
Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation
299(1)
Motivation to Learn
299(2)
Behavioral Views of Motivation
301(2)
Using Rewards in Classrooms
301(1)
Criticisms of Behavioral Approaches to Motivation
301(2)
Humanistic Views of Motivation
303(4)
Development of the Whole Person
303(4)
Cognitive Theories of Motivation
307(21)
Expectancy X Value Theory
307(3)
Self-Efficacy: Beliefs About Capability
310(2)
Goals and Goal Orientation
312(4)
Attribution Theory
316(5)
Self-Determination Theory
321(2)
Assessment and Learning: The Role of Assessment in Self-Determination
323(3)
Diversity in Motivation to Learn
326(2)
Affective Factors in Motivation
328(6)
Self-Worth Theory
328(1)
Arousal and Anxiety
329(5)
Motivation in the Classroom
334(32)
Class Structure: Creating a Learning-Focused Environment
337(1)
Self-Regulated Learners: Developing Student Responsibility
338(4)
Developing Self-Regulation: Applying Self-Determination Theory
338(4)
Teacher Characteristics: Personal Qualities That Increase Student Motivation to Learn
342(6)
Personal Teaching Efficacy: Beliefs About Teaching and Learning
343(1)
Modeling and Enthusiasm: Communicating Genuine Interest
343(1)
Caring: Meeting the Need for Belonging and Relatedness
344(1)
Teacher Expectations: Increasing Perceptions of Competence
345(3)
Climate Variables: Creating a Motivating Environment
348(4)
Order and Safety: Classrooms as Secure Places to Learn
348(1)
Success: Developing Learner Self-Efficacy
349(1)
Challenge: Increasing Perceptions of Competence and Self-Determination
350(1)
Task Comprehension: Increasing Perceptions of Autonomy and Value
350(1)
The Target Program: Applying Goal Theory in Classrooms
351(1)
Instructional Variables: Developing Interest in Learning Activities
352(14)
Introductory Focus: Attracting Students' Attention
353(1)
Personalization: Links to Students' Lives
354(1)
Involvement: Increasing Intrinsic Motivation
355(2)
Feedback: Meeting the Need to Understand
357(2)
Assessment and Learning: Using Feedback to Increase Interest and Self-Efficacy
359(1)
Learning Contexts: Motivation to Learn in the Urban Classroom
360(6)
Creating Productive Learning Environments: Classroom Management
366(38)
The Importance of Well-Managed Classrooms
369(4)
Public and Professional Concerns
369(1)
The Complexities of Classrooms
369(1)
Influence on Motivation and Learning
370(1)
Goals of Classroom Management
371(2)
Planning for Productive Classroom Environments
373(11)
Accommodating Student Characteristics
373(1)
Arranging the Physical Environment
374(2)
Organizing for Instruction
376(5)
Learning Contexts: Classroom Management in Urban Environments
381(3)
Communication with Parents
384(5)
Benefits of Communication
384(3)
Communication with Parents: Accommodating Learner Diversity
387(2)
Intervening When Misbehavior Occurs
389(9)
Guidelines for Successful Interventions
390(2)
Cognitive Interventions
392(2)
Behavioral Interventions
394(1)
An Intervention Continuum
395(3)
Serious Management Problems: Violence and Aggression
398(6)
School Violence and Aggression
398(1)
Long-Term Solutions to Violence and Aggression
399(5)
Creating Productive Learning Environments: Principles and Models of Instruction
404(38)
Planning for Instruction
406(7)
Selecting Topics
407(1)
Preparing Learning Objectives
407(2)
Preparing and Organizing Learning Activities
409(1)
Planning for Assessment
410(1)
Instructional Alignment
410(1)
Planning in a Standards-Based Environment
411(2)
Implementing Instruction: Essential Teaching Skills
413(10)
Attitudes
414(1)
Organization
415(1)
Communication
415(1)
Focus: Attracting and Maintaining Attention
416(1)
Feedback
416(2)
Questioning
418(2)
Learning Contexts: Instruction in Urban Environments
420(3)
Models of Instruction
423(13)
Direct Instruction
423(4)
Lecture and Lecture-Discussion
427(3)
Guided Discovery
430(1)
Cooperative Learning
431(2)
Cooperative Learning: A Tool for Capitalizing on Diversity
433(3)
Assessment and Learning: Using Assessment as a Learning Tool
436(6)
Learning and Instruction and Technology
442(30)
What Is Technology?
444(5)
Technology and Learning
445(1)
Behaviorism and Technology
445(1)
Technology and Cognitive Learning Theory
446(3)
Social Cognitive Theory and Technology
449(1)
Technology and Instruction
449(16)
Drill-and-Practice Software
450(1)
Tutorials
450(2)
Simulations
452(3)
Databases and Spreadsheets
455(2)
Word Processing: Using Technology to Teach Writing
457(1)
Internet-Based Technologies
458(2)
Distance Education
460(1)
Exploring Diversity: Employing Technology to Support Learners with Disabilities
461(2)
Using Technology in the Classroom: Findings from Research
463(2)
Teacher-Support Applications of Technology
465(7)
Preparing Instructional Materials
465(1)
Classroom Assessment
465(2)
Communicating With Parents
467(5)
Assessing Classroom Learning
472(36)
Classroom Assessment
476(3)
Functions of Classroom Assessment
476(1)
Validity: Making Appropriate Assessment Decisions
477(1)
Reliability: Consistency in Assessment
477(2)
Traditional Assessment Strategies
479(8)
Teachers' Assessment Patterns
479(7)
Commercially Prepared Test Items
486(1)
Alternative Assessment
487(12)
Performance Assessment
487(3)
Portfolio Assessment: Involving Students in Alternative Assessment
490(2)
Putting Traditional and Alternative Assessments into Perspective
492(2)
Planning for Assessment
494(1)
Preparing Students for Assessments
495(2)
Administering Assessments
497(1)
Analyzing Results
498(1)
Grading and Reporting: The Total Assessment System
499(9)
Designing a Grading System
499(1)
Assigning Grades: Increasing Learning and Motivation
500(2)
Learning Contexts: Assessment in Urban Classrooms
502(6)
Assessment Through Standardized Testing
508
Standardized Tests
511(7)
Functions of Standardized Tests
512(1)
Types of Standardized Tests
512(3)
Evaluating Standardized Tests: Validity Revisited
515(3)
Understanding and Interpreting Standardized Test Scores
518(7)
Descriptive Statistics
519(2)
Interpreting Standardized Test Results
521(4)
Accountability Issues in Standardized Testing
525(3)
Standards-Based Education and Accountability
525(1)
Testing Teachers
526(2)
Diversity Issues in Standardized Testing
528
Student Diversity and Test Bias
528(3)
Issues in Standardized Testing: Implications for Teachers
531
Appendix A Using This Text to Practice for the Praxis™ Principles of Learning and Teaching Exam 1(8)
Appendix B Feedback for ``Checking Your Understanding'' Questions 9
Glossary 1(1)
References 1(1)
Author Index 1(5)
Subject Index 6


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