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Elementary Classroom Management : Lessons from Research and Practice,9780072322439

Elementary Classroom Management : Lessons from Research and Practice

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780072322439

ISBN10:
0072322438
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/8/2002
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
List Price: $60.24
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  • Elementary Classroom Management : Lessons from Research and Practice
    Elementary Classroom Management : Lessons from Research and Practice
  • Elementary Classroom Management : Lessons from Research and Practice
    Elementary Classroom Management : Lessons from Research and Practice
  • Elementary Classroom Management: Lessons from Research and Practice
    Elementary Classroom Management: Lessons from Research and Practice




Summary

Written in a lively, engaging, conversational style that teacher education students appreciate, Elementary Classroom Management combines what research has to say about effective classroom management with knowledge culled from practice. The text is scholarly and research-based, yet realistic and practical. The text shows how four masterful teachers (grades 1, 3, 4 and 5/6) in very different school settings create classrooms that are orderly and productive, yet humane and caring. By integrating into discussions of research-based management principles, both the thinking and the actual management practices of four real elementary teachers, readers come to "know" these teachers and their classrooms. We hear about the classes they teach and about the physical constraints of their rooms, hear them reflect on their rules and routines, and watch as they teach those rules and routines to students. We listen as they talk about motivating students and building community and as they discuss appropriate ways to deal with misbehavior. Well-organized and more comprehensive than many classroom management texts, Elementary Classroom Management includes chapters on building safer, more caring classrooms; working with families; using time effectively; motivation; working with troubled students and students with special needs; and violence prevention. It also addresses the managerial challenges involved in a variety of instructional formats, such as seatwork, recitations and discussions, and groupwork. The third edition features updated and expanded coverage. The revision stresses the need to build caring, supportive relationships with and among students. It responds to current concerns about students' alienation, isolation, apathy, and lack of motivation so that prospective and beginning teachers see that classroom management is not simply about rules, rewards, and consequences, but also about building connections with students and creating safer, more caring classrooms.

Table of Contents

Preface xvi
Part 1 INTRODUCTION 1(28)
The Elementary Classroom Environment: Crowded, Complex, and Potentially Chaotic
2(10)
Guiding Assumptions
6(3)
Plan of the Book
9(3)
Summary
10(1)
References
11(1)
Meeting the Teachers (and Their Students)
12(17)
Viviana Love
13(2)
Garnetta Chain
15(3)
Ken Kowalski
18(2)
Barbara Broggi
20(3)
What Do the Students Say?
23(2)
Concluding Comments
25(4)
Summary
26(1)
References
27(2)
Part 2 ESTABLISHING AN ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING 29(154)
Designing the Physical Environment
30(28)
Six Functions of the Classroom Setting
31(13)
Security and Shelter
32(2)
Social Contact
34(5)
Symbolic Indentification
39(1)
Task Instrumentality
40(1)
Pleasure
40(2)
Growth
42(2)
The Teacher as Environmental Designer
44(3)
Think about the Activities the Room Will Accommodate
45(1)
Draw a Floor Plan
46(1)
Involve Students in Environmental Planning
47(1)
Try the New Arrangement, Evaluate, and Redesign
47(1)
Designing a Fourth-Grade Classroom
47(11)
Summary
51(1)
Activities
52(3)
For Further Reading
55(1)
Organizational Resources
55(1)
References
56(2)
Establishing Norms for Behavior
58(26)
Research on Effective Classroom Management
59(1)
Defining Your Expectations for Behavior
60(8)
Planning Norms for General Conduct
61(4)
Planning Routines for Specific Situations
65(3)
The First Few Days of School: Teaching Students How to Behave
68(10)
Teaching Norms for General Conduct
69(2)
Teaching Routines for Specific Situations
71(1)
Different Approaches to Teaching Rules and Routines
72(6)
Concluding Comments
78(6)
Summary
79(1)
Activities
80(2)
For Further Reading
82(1)
References
82(2)
Creating Safer, More Caring Classrooms
84(32)
Ways of Showing Care and Respect
87(15)
Be Welcoming
87(1)
Be Sensitive to Children's Concerns
87(2)
Be Fair
89(1)
Be a Real Person (Not Just a Teacher)
90(2)
Promote Autonomy by Sharing Responsibility
92(1)
Reduce the Use of Extrinsic Control
93(1)
Be Inclusive
94(1)
Search for Students' Strengths
95(2)
Develop Communication Skills
97(5)
A Note about Touching
102(1)
Building Caring Relationships among Students
102(8)
Hold Class Meetings
103(1)
Model and Recognize Prosocial Behavior
104(1)
Provide Opportunities for Students to Get to Know One Another
105(2)
Curb Peer Harassment
107(1)
Be Alert for Student-to-Student Sexual Harassment
108(1)
Use Cooperative Learning Groups
109(1)
Concluding Comments
110(6)
Summary
111(1)
Activities
112(1)
For Further Reading
112(1)
Organizational Resources
113(1)
References
113(3)
Working with Families
116(38)
Barriers to Family-Teacher Cooperation
117(4)
Teacher Reluctance to Involve Families in Schooling
117(2)
Parent Reluctance to Become Involved in Schooling
119(2)
The Changing Nature of the Family
121(1)
Overcoming the Barriers: Fostering Collaboration between Families and Schools
121(27)
Type 1: Helping Families to Fulfill Their Basic Obligations
121(3)
Type 2: Fulfilling the Basic Obligations of Schools---Communicating with Families
124(17)
Type 3: Family Involvement in School
141(3)
Type 4: Family Involvement in Learning Activities at Home
144(4)
Concluding Comments
148(6)
Summary
148(1)
Activities
149(1)
For Further Reading
150(1)
Organizational Resources
151(1)
References
151(3)
Making the Most of Classroom Time
154(29)
How Much Time Is There, Anyway?
155(4)
Increasing Opportunity to Learn
159(17)
Maintaining Activity Flow
159(3)
Minimizing Transition Times
162(5)
Holding Students Accountable
167(5)
Managing Pullouts as Efficiently as Possible
172(4)
Concluding Comments
176(7)
Summary
176(1)
Activities
177(4)
For Further Reading
181(1)
References
181(2)
Part 3 ORGANIZING AND MANAGING INSTRUCTION 183(128)
Enhancing Students' Motivation
184(23)
What is Realistic? What Is Appropriate?
185(3)
An Expectancy X Value Framework
186(2)
Strategies for Increasing Expectations of Success
188(4)
Provide Opportunities for Success
188(1)
Teach Students to Set Reasonable Goals and to Assess Their Own Performance
189(1)
Help Students Recognize the Relationship between Effort and Outcome
189(1)
Provide Informative Feedback
189(2)
Provide Special Motivational Support to Discouraged Students
191(1)
Enhancing the Value of the Task
192(9)
Relate Lessons to Students' Own Lives
192(1)
Provide Opportunities for Choice
193(1)
Model Interest in Learning and Express Enthusiasm for the Material
194(1)
Include Novelty/Variety Elements
194(1)
Provide Opportunities for Students to Respond Actively
194(1)
Allow Students to Create Finished Products
194(1)
Provide Opportunities for Students to Interact with Peers
195(1)
Provide Extrinsic Rewards
195(6)
Motivating Underachieving and Disaffected Students
201(1)
Concluding Comments
202(5)
Summary
202(2)
Activities
204(1)
For Further Reading
204(1)
References
205(2)
Managing Independent Work
207(31)
Seatwork: How Much, What, and Why?
209(1)
The Challenges for Teachers
210(3)
The Challenges for Students
213(3)
Implications for Practice
216(16)
Assign Work That Is Clear and Meaningful
216(2)
Match the Work to Varying Achievement Levels
218(1)
Make Sure Oral Directions Are Clear
218(3)
Monitor Behavior and Comprehension
221(3)
Teach Children What to Do if They Get Stuck
224(1)
Plan for Ragged Endings
225(1)
Find Alternatives to workbook Pages
226(6)
Concluding Comments
232(6)
Summary
233(1)
Activities
234(2)
For Further Reading
236(1)
References
236(2)
Managing Groupwork
238(35)
The Pitfalls of Groupwork
240(5)
Designing and Implementing Successful Groupwork
245(17)
Decide on the Type of Group to Use
245(5)
Decide on the Size of the Group
250(1)
Assign Students to Groups
251(2)
Structure the Task for Positive Interdependence
253(1)
Ensure Individual Accountablity
254(2)
Teach Students to Cooperate
256(6)
Monitor Learning, Involvement, and Cooperative Behavior
262(1)
Four Specific Approaches to Cooperative Learning
262(3)
STAD
263(1)
Jigsaw and Jigsaw II
263(1)
Group Investigation
264(1)
The Structural Approach to Cooperative Learning
264(1)
Concluding Comments
265(8)
Summary
267(2)
Activities
269(1)
For Further Reading
270(1)
References
270(3)
Managing Recitations and Discussions
273(38)
The Pitfalls of Recitations
281(2)
Unequal Participation
281(1)
Losing It All: Pace, Focus, and Involvement
281(2)
Difficulties in Monitoring Students' Comprehension
283(1)
Strategies for Managing Recitations
283(13)
Distributing Chances to Participate
284(5)
Providing Time to Think without Losing the Pace
289(1)
Stimulating and Maintaining Interest
290(2)
Providing Feedback without Losing the Pace
292(2)
Monitoring Comprehension: Requiring Overt Responses
294(2)
Monitoring Comprehension: Using a Steering Group
296(1)
Moderating Discussions
296(6)
Concluding Comments
302(9)
Summary
303(2)
Activities
305(2)
For Further Reading
307(1)
References
307(4)
Part 4 COPING WITH THE CHALLENGES 311
When Prevention Is Not Enough: Protecting and Restoring Order
312(40)
Principles for Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
314(4)
Dealing with Minor Misbehavior
318(5)
Nonverbal Interventions
318(2)
Verbal Interventions
320(3)
Deliberately Ignoring the Misbehavior
323(1)
Dealing with More Serious Misbehavior: Using Penalties
323(7)
Selecting Penalties
324(3)
Imposing Penalties
327(1)
The Issue of Consistency
328(1)
Pealizing the Group for Individual Misbehavior
329(1)
Dealing with Chronic Misbehavior
330(8)
Resolving Conflicts through Problem Solving
330(1)
Approaches Based on Principles of Behavior Modification
331(5)
Using an Ecosystemic Approach: Changing Problem Behavior by Reframing
336(2)
Dealing with Thorny Problems
338(1)
Tattling
338(6)
Cheating
339(1)
Stealing
340(1)
Profanity
341(1)
Defiance
342(1)
Sexually Related Behavior
343(1)
Failure to Do Homework
343(1)
Concluding Comments
344(8)
Summary
346(2)
Activities
348(1)
For Further Reading
349(1)
References
349(3)
Helping Students with Special Needs
352(37)
Helping Children with Disabilities and ADHD
355(12)
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
358(2)
Strategies for Helping Children with Disabilities and ADHD
360(7)
Helping Children Who Are Second-Language Learners
367(2)
Helping Students Who Are Troubled
369(13)
Substance Abuse
370(7)
Abuse and Neglect
377(4)
Depression
381(1)
Concluding Comments
382(7)
Summary
382(2)
Activities
384(2)
For Further Reading
386(1)
References
386(3)
Preventing and Responding to Violence
389
How Much Violence Is There?
390(1)
Strategies for Preventing Violence
391(14)
Building Supportive School Communities
391(1)
Teaching Conflict Resolution
392(8)
Knowing the Early Warning Signs of Potential for Violence
400(2)
Being Attentive to Whispers and Rumors
402(1)
De-Escalating Potentially Explosive Situations
403(2)
Responding to Violence
405(4)
Coping with Aggressive Behavior
405(3)
Responding Effectively to Physical Fights
408(1)
Concluding Comments
409
Summary
409(1)
Activities
410(1)
For Further Reading
411(1)
Organizational Resources
411(1)
References
412
Index 1


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