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Emphasis Art : A Qualitative Art Program for Elementary and Middle Schools,9780321023513
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Emphasis Art : A Qualitative Art Program for Elementary and Middle Schools

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780321023513

ISBN10:
032102351X
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $109.40
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Summary

This beautifully illustrated text reflects the latest trends in art education and demonstrates how to motivate students to learn by integrating art with other content areas. Emphasis Art, 7/e focuses on the intrinsic worth of art-studio experience and the process of implementing art education into classroom practice with a new emphasis on cultural understanding. In addition to a wealth of creative ideas and clear technical direction, this popular text promotes art appreciation and provides teachers with lesson plans that incorporate instructional objectives. It also shows ways to incorporate the widely used "Discipline Based Art Education" method.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
PART 1 Introduction to Art 1(22)
The Role of Art in Society and in the Schools
3(9)
Cultural Understanding
3(1)
National Needs
4(1)
Giving Importance and Making Special
4(1)
Personal Communication and Expression
4(1)
General Creativity and Artistic Creativity
4(1)
Vocations
4(1)
Aesthetic Awareness
4(2)
Literacy and Cognition
6(1)
A Core Participant in Learning in School
6(1)
A Different Way of Learning and Communicating in School
7(1)
A Qualitative Approach to Teaching Art
7(5)
Art as Art: The Design Fundamentals
12(11)
Line
12(1)
Shape
12(2)
Value
14(1)
Color
14(3)
Space
17(1)
Texture and Pattern
18(1)
Balance and Symmetry
19(1)
Variety, Repetition, Emphasis, and Domination-Subordination
20(1)
Formalism and Other Concepts
21(2)
PART 2 Teachers and Teaching 23(26)
The Role of the Dedicated Teacher
25(5)
Who Teaches Art?
26(2)
Guiding Students to Create and to Appreciate
28(1)
The Teacher's Positive Personality, Rapport, and Respect
28(2)
Teaching Strategies
30(8)
The Art Room: Appearance and Atmosphere
30(1)
Using Nonverbal Instructions
31(1)
Planning the Distribution, Collection, and Organization of Materials
32(1)
Beginning the Lesson
32(1)
Getting the Design Off to a Good Start
32(1)
Nurturing Creativity During the Working Period
33(1)
Strategies for Fostering Perseverance
33(2)
Cleanup and Evaluation
35(1)
Classroom Management
36(2)
Art Motivation
38(11)
Personal Experience
38(5)
Still Lifes as Artistic Arrangements
43(1)
Bulletin Boards and Art History
43(2)
The Art Medium
45(1)
Amount and Timing of Motivation
46(1)
Exhibitions
46(3)
PART 3 Curriculum for and Nature of the Learner 49(96)
Educational Psychology Considerations on Children's Learning and Creative Development
51(14)
Mind, Eye, Heart, Hand, or Context?
51(1)
Constructivism
52(3)
Role of the Social Context
55(2)
Role of the Emotions: The Intuitive and the Nonrational
57(2)
Transformation
59(1)
Children's Similarities and Variability
60(5)
A Sequential Curriculum for Kindergarten
65(14)
Artistic Development and Drawing
69(4)
Painting and Other Media
73(3)
Art Criticism
76(1)
Art History
77(1)
Aesthetics
77(1)
Suggested Subjects or Themes
77(2)
A Sequential Curriculum for Grades 1 and 2
79(13)
Developmental Characteristics
79(1)
Art Development
80(4)
Art Criticism, Art History, and Aesthetics
84(1)
Designing, Drawing, and Painting
85(4)
Collage (Cut and Paste)
89(1)
Printmaking
89(1)
Ceramics
89(2)
Suggested Subjects or Themes
91(1)
A Sequential Curriculum for Grades 3 and 4
92(7)
Developmental Characteristics
92(1)
Art Development
93(1)
Art Criticism, Art History, and Aesthetics
94(1)
Drawing, Designing, and Painting
95(1)
Color Awareness
96(1)
Collage
97(1)
Printmaking
97(1)
Ceramics
98(1)
Suggested Subjects or Themes
98(1)
A Sequential Curriculum for Grades 5 and 6
99(13)
Developmental Characteristics
100(1)
Art Development
101(1)
Art Criticism
102(1)
Art History and Aesthetics
103(2)
Drawing, Designing, and Painting
105(2)
Collage
107(2)
Printmaking
109(1)
Ceramics and Crafts
110(1)
Suggested Subjects or Themes
111(1)
A Sequential Curriculum for Grades 7 and 8
112(12)
Developmental Characteristics
113(1)
Emotional Vulnerability
114(3)
Art Criticism
117(1)
Art History and Aesthetics
117(2)
Art Development
119(1)
Drawing, Designing, and Painting
119(2)
Printmaking
121(1)
Ceramics and Sculpture
121(1)
Crafts
122(1)
Collage, Photography, and Computer Art
122(1)
Suggested Subjects or Themes
123(1)
Art for Students Experiencing Cognitive or Physical Developmental Disabilities
124(11)
Eight Concepts in Special Education
124(3)
General Teaching Strategies
127(6)
Using Art for Community and School Integration
133(1)
Experiences and Objects That May Appeal to Students with Physical or Cognitive Disabilities
134(1)
Specialized Materials
134(1)
Giftedness and Art Thinking
135(10)
Creativity
138(1)
Characteristics of Students Gifted in Art
139(2)
Teaching Strategies
141(1)
Extending into the School, Home, and Community
141(4)
PART 4 Art's Content: Integration with Other Subjects 145(68)
Introduction to Integration and the Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor Domains
147(9)
Introduction to Integration
147(1)
Integration through the Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor Domains
148(7)
Clay Dinosaurs: A Sample Lesson Plan Combining Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor Objectives with Art Objectives
155(1)
Science, Math, and Art
156(18)
Animal Life
159(1)
Astronomy: Our Solar System
159(1)
Climate
160(1)
Foods and Nutrition
160(1)
Geology
161(1)
Human Body, Anatomy, and Growth
162(1)
Insects
163(1)
Light and Perception
163(1)
Magnetism
163(2)
Mathematics
165(3)
Molecules
168(1)
Plants and Botany
168(2)
Simple Machines
170(1)
Sound
170(1)
Technology and Energy
171(1)
Water
171(1)
Weather, Wind, and Air
172(2)
Social Studies, Multicultural Inquiry, and Art Integration
174(23)
Social Studies Curriculum Across the Grades
174(2)
Personalized Responses
176(1)
Hands-on Art Activity
177(1)
Danger of Social Studies/Art Integration
177(1)
Drawing a Still-Life Arrangement
178(2)
Use of Models and Speakers
180(1)
Sketching Trips
181(1)
Using Art Reproductions for Art Criticism and Social Studies
181(2)
Anthropology
183(1)
Economics/Vocations
184(1)
Geography and Map Reading
185(2)
History
187(1)
Law-Related Education
187(1)
Psychology
188(2)
Sociology
190(2)
Multicultural Understanding Through Art
192(5)
Literacy: Reading, Writing, and Speech Integration with Art
197(7)
Whole Language Approach
200(4)
Related Arts Integration
204(9)
Music
207(2)
Dance
209(1)
Drama
210(3)
PART 5 Art Appreciation, Art History, Art Criticism, and Aesthetics 213(28)
New Approaches to Art Appreciation
215(8)
Art Appreciation in the Schools: From Picture Study to Discipline-Based Art Education
215(3)
General Methods for Art Discussions
218(2)
Gamelike Educational Activities
220(3)
Teaching Art History
223(6)
Conducting Art History Discussions
223(1)
Art History Teaching Methods
224(5)
Teaching Art Criticism and Aesthetics
229(12)
Conducting Art Criticism Discussions
229(1)
An Approach to Art Criticism
229(5)
Two Perspectives on Art Criticism: Formalism and Contextualism
234(1)
Conducting Discussions of Aesthetics
235(5)
Art Criticism at Home
240(1)
PART 6 Teaching Art Production 241(128)
Drawing
243(23)
Three Kinds of Drawing
243(2)
Figure Drawing
245(8)
Portrait and Self-Portrait Drawings
253(1)
Drawing the Landscape or Cityscape
253(4)
Drawing the Still Life
257(3)
Drawing Animals
260(2)
Drawing Media, Especially Markets
262(4)
Crayon and Oil Pastels
266(14)
Crayon
266(2)
Crayon Resist
268(3)
Crayon Engraving
271(3)
Crayon Encaustic
274(2)
Oil Pastel
276(1)
Oil-Pastel Resist
277(3)
Painting
280(12)
Painting with Watercolors
280(2)
Painting with Tempera
282(3)
Tempera Resist
285(4)
Mural Making
289(3)
Paper Projects in Two Dimensions
292(9)
Collage
292(1)
Tissue-Paper Collage
293(4)
Mosaics
297(4)
Printmaking
301(13)
Printmaking with Found Objects
301(2)
Glue Line-Relief prints
303(1)
Collographs
304(3)
Linoleum Prints and Styrofoam® Prints
307(3)
Proofing, Inking, and Printing
310(2)
Aluminum-Foil Reliefs
312(2)
Visual Technology: Computer Art, Photography, and Video
314(10)
Computer Art
315(3)
Photography
318(3)
Video
321(3)
Three-Dimensional Design: Additive and Subtractive Sculpture
324(14)
Box Sculpture and Constructions in Space
325(5)
Masks
330(3)
Totem Poles
333(2)
Subtractive Sculpture in Plaster
335(3)
Architecture
338(5)
Crafts
343(13)
Weaving
349(3)
Starch-Resist Batik
352(4)
Clay Modeling
356(13)
Clay in the Primary Grades
356(5)
Clay in the Upper Grades
361(1)
Construction Techniques
362(2)
Drying, Firing, Glazing, and Staining
364(1)
Clay Plaster Reliefs
365(4)
PART 7 Objectives and Evaluation Criteria 369(23)
Assessment of Art Learning
371(21)
The Need for Open Objectives and Evaluational Criteria
372(1)
The Need for Defined Objectives and Evaluational Criteria
372(2)
Categories of Art Objectives and Assessment
374(1)
Objectives and Evaluation of Art Production
375(1)
Formative Objectives: In-Process Evaluation of Student Work
376(4)
Objectives and Assessment of Artistic Perception
380(3)
Objectives and Evaluation of Art Criticism
383(1)
Objectives and Assessment in Aesthetics
383(1)
Objectives and Evaluation of Art History Learning
384(1)
Reporting Art Progress to Parents
385(5)
Summative Evaluation
390(1)
Concluding Statement
391(1)
Appendix A Art Materials, Safety Concerns, Modeling Formulas, and Facilities Planning 392(7)
Appendix B A Brief Chronology of Art Education in the United States 399(3)
Appendix C Recommended Readings 402(6)
Appendix D Addresses of Professional Associations, Art Materials Suppliers, Audiovisual Sources, Computer Websites, and Electronic Lesson Plan Databases 408(2)
Glossary 410(3)
Photo Credits 413(1)
Index 414


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