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Engineer's Guide to MATLAB, An,9780130113351
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Engineer's Guide to MATLAB, An

by ; ; ; ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780130113351

ISBN10:
0130113352
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

This authoritative book guides readers in developing a strong working knowledge of MATLAB to solve a wide range of engineering problems. Since solving these problems usually involves writing relatively short, one-time-use programs, the authors demonstrate how to effectively develop such programs in MATLAB-programs that are compact yet readable, easy to debug, and execute fast. Emphasis is on using MATLAB to obtain solutions to several classes of engineering problems, so technical material is presented in summary form only.

Author Biography

Edward B. Magrab is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Introduction
1(14)
Edward B. Magrab
Introduction
1(1)
Ways to Use Matlab
1(2)
Creating Variable Names
3(1)
Management of Variables
3(1)
Accessing Scripts and Function Files
4(1)
Command Window Management
4(1)
Script and Function Output to the Command Window
5(1)
Online Help
6(1)
Basic Matlab Syntax
6(2)
Some Suggestions on How to Use Matlab
8(7)
Exercises
9(4)
Appendix A Summary of Matlab Special Characters
13(2)
Matrices and Matlab
15(54)
Edward B. Magrab
Introduction
15(1)
Matrices and Vectors
16(3)
Square Matrix
16(1)
Diagonal Matrix
16(1)
Column and Row Matrices (Vectors)
17(1)
Transpose of a Matrix and a Vector
18(1)
Creation of Vectors
19(5)
Creation of Matrices
24(11)
Dot Operations
35(6)
Mathematical Operation with Matrices
41(28)
Addition and Subtraction
41(1)
Multiplication
41(12)
Matrix Inverse
53(1)
Determinants
54(3)
Solution of a System of Equations
57(2)
Exercises
59(10)
Data Input/Output
69(12)
Edward B. Magrab
Strings (Literals) and Annotated Output
69(6)
Entering Data with input
75(2)
Entering a Scalar
75(1)
Entering a String
76(1)
Entering a Vector
76(1)
Entering a Matrix
77(1)
Input/Output Data Files
77(4)
Exercises
80(1)
Program Flow Control
81(20)
Edward B. Magrab
Introduction
81(2)
Control of Program Flow
83(10)
While Loop
83(1)
If Statements
84(2)
For Loop
86(5)
Early Termination of Either a for or while Loop
91(1)
Switch Statement
91(2)
Two Applications of Program Control Structures
93(8)
Generation of a 2k Factorial Table
93(2)
Multiple Root Finding Using Interval Halving
95(2)
Exercises
97(4)
Functions
101(58)
Edward B. Magrab
Introduction
102(1)
Why Use Functions
102(1)
Naming Functions
102(1)
Length of Functions
103(1)
Debugging Functions
103(1)
The Function File
103(5)
Form #1: Input Arguments Individually Identified and One Output Variable
104(2)
Form #2: Input Arguments Represented as a Vector and One Output Variable
106(1)
Form #3: Input Arguments Represented as a Vector and Each Output Variable Individually Identified
106(2)
Two Special Cases
108(1)
inline
108(1)
Creating Functions That Use feval (Function of Functions)
109(1)
Matlab Functions That Use feval
110(22)
Zeros of Functions---fzero, and roots/poly
111(6)
Numerical Integration---quad8, trapz, and polyarea
117(3)
Local Minimum of a Function---fminbnd
120(2)
Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations---ode45
122(9)
Numerical Solutions of Nonlinear Equations---fsolve
131(1)
Examples of Several Other Matlab Functions
132(27)
Fitting Data with Polynomials---polyfit/polyval
132(2)
Interpolation of Data---interpl
134(2)
Fitting Data with spline
136(2)
Digital Signal Processing---fft and ifft
138(6)
Exercises
144(15)
2D Graphics
159(48)
Edward B. Magrab
Introduction
159(4)
Basic 2D Plotting Commands
163(9)
Points
163(1)
Lines
163(3)
Circles
166(1)
Function vs. Function
166(1)
Family of Curves
167(3)
Multiple Functions on One Figure
170(2)
Graph Annotation and Visual Enhancement
172(35)
Axes and Curve Labels, Figure Titles, Legends, Text, and Other Attributes
172(8)
Repeating Curves: Display of cot(x) From 0 ≤ x ≤ mπ
180(2)
Polar Plot: Far Field Radiation Pattern of a Sound Source
182(2)
Multiple Figures: Spectral Plot of a Periodic Pulse Train and a Single Pulse
184(2)
Multiple Curves: Notch Sensitivity for Steel
186(2)
Multiple Curves with Different y-axes: plotyy
188(1)
Reading Numerical Values from Graphs: ginput
189(2)
Area Fill Using Random Numbers
191(1)
Exercises
192(15)
3D Graphics
207(32)
Edward B. Magrab
Lines in 3D
207(3)
Surfaces
210(29)
Exercises
232(7)
Design of Machine Elements
239(82)
Edward B. Magrab
Vectors, Forces, and the Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies
239(11)
Stresses and Deflections in Beams, Columns, and Shafts
250(21)
Statically Determinate Beams
250(11)
Beams with Overhangs
261(2)
Buckling of Columns
263(2)
Shafts Subjected to Alternating Loads
265(6)
Stresses in Spur Gears
271(9)
Kinematics of a Four-Bar Linkage
280(7)
Position and Velocity of the Links
280(5)
Synthesis of a Four-bar Linkage
285(2)
Cam Profiles and Synthesis
287(10)
Cam Displacement
287(3)
Translating Flat-Face Follower
290(3)
Translating Offset Roller Follower
293(2)
Cam Radius of Curvature
295(2)
Hydrodynamic Bearings
297(4)
PDE Toolbox and the Stress Concentration Factor for Notches in a Thin Plate
301(20)
Exercises
309(12)
Dynamics and Vibrations
321(70)
Balakumar Balachandran
Orbital Motions
321(3)
Single-Degree-of-Freedom Systems
324(23)
Introduction
324(2)
Free Oscillations of Linear Systems
326(6)
Free Oscillations of Nonlinear Systems
332(6)
Forced Oscillations of Linear and Nonlinear Systems
338(3)
Frequency Response and the Response to Step and Impulse Excitations
341(6)
Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Systems
347(10)
Free Oscillations
347(6)
Forced Oscillations and the Vibration Absorber
353(4)
Vibrations of Thin Beams
357(34)
Beams with Uniform Cross Section
357(9)
Beams with Variable Cross Section
366(2)
Beam Carrying a Concentrated Mass
368(4)
Exercises
372(9)
Appendix B Beam Functions Used in Section 9.4
381(10)
Control Systems
391(88)
Gregory C. Walsh
Introduction to Control System Design
392(2)
Tools for Controller Design
392(1)
Naming and File Conventions
393(1)
Representations of Systems in Matlab
394(17)
State-Space Models
395(6)
Transfer-Function Representation
401(2)
Discrete-Time Models
403(3)
Block Diagrams
406(4)
Conversion between Representations
410(1)
Response of Systems
411(12)
Simulation
411(4)
Estimating Response from Poles and Zeros
415(8)
Design Tools
423(14)
Design Criteria
424(3)
Design Tools
427(10)
Design Examples
437(42)
Notch Control of a Flexible Pointer
438(7)
PID Control of a Magnetic Suspension System
445(9)
Lead Control of an Inverted Pendulum
454(7)
Control of a Magnetically Suspended Flywheel
461(9)
Exercises
470(9)
Fluid Mechanics
479(38)
James H. Duncan
Hydrostatics
479(7)
Pressure Distribution in the Standard Atmosphere
480(1)
Force on a Planar Gate
481(5)
Internal Viscous Flow
486(7)
Laminar Flow in a Horizontal Pipe with Various Cross Sections
486(3)
Downward Flow in a Vertical Pipe
489(1)
Three-Reservoir Problem
490(3)
External Flow
493(24)
Boundary Layer on an Infinite Plate Started Suddenly from Rest
493(1)
Blasius Boundary Layer
494(3)
Potential Flow
497(8)
Exercises
505(12)
Heat Transfer
517(54)
Keith E. Herold
Heat Conduction
518(7)
Transient Heat Conduction in a Semi-Infinite Slab with Surface Convection
518(1)
Transient Heat Conduction in an Infinite Solid Cylinder with Convection
519(2)
Transient One-Dimensional Conduction with a Heat Source
521(4)
Sizing of Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers
525(11)
Convection Heat Transfer
536(14)
Thermal Boundary Layer on a Flat Plate---Similarity Solution
536(5)
Natural Convection Similarity Solution
541(7)
Temperature Distribution in a Printed Circuit Board
548(2)
Radiation Heat Transfer
550(21)
Radiation View Factor---Differential Area to Arbitrary Rectangle in Parallel Planes
550(5)
View Factor between Two Rectangles in Parallel Planes
555(3)
Enclosure Radiation with Diffuse Gray Walls
558(3)
Transient Radiation Heating of a Plate in a Furnace
561(1)
Exercises
562(9)
Optimization
571(48)
Shapour Azarm
Definition, Formulation, and Graphical Solutions
571(3)
Introduction
571(1)
Graphical Solution
572(2)
Linear Programming
574(2)
Nonlinear Programming
576(6)
Unconstrained Methods
577(1)
Fitting Curves to Data
578(2)
Least Squares
580(2)
Single-Objective Constrained Methods
582(15)
Constrained Single-Variable Method
582(1)
Constrained Multi-Variable Method
583(10)
Quadratic Programming
593(1)
Semi-Infinitely Constrained Method
594(3)
Multiobjective Optimization
597(22)
Exercises
605(14)
Engineering Statistics
619(66)
Edward B. Magrab
Descriptive Statistical Quantities
619(7)
Probability Distributions
626(14)
Discrete Distributions
626(3)
Continuous Distributions
629(11)
Confidence Intervals
640(4)
Hypothesis Testing
644(5)
Linear Regression
649(10)
Simple Linear Regression
649(3)
Multiple Linear Regression
652(7)
Design of Experiments
659(26)
Single-Factor Experiments: Analysis of Variance
659(3)
Multiple-Factor Experiments
662(12)
Exercises
674(11)
Index 685

Excerpts

PREFACE The primary goal of this book is to guide the reader in developing a strong working knowledge of MATLAB to solve engineering problems. Typically, solving these problems involves writing relatively short, one-time-use programs. Therefore, in this book we attempt to teach how to effectively develop such programs in MATLAB, ones that are compact, yet readable, are easy to debug, and execute fast. The first seven chapters of the book are intended for use in a sophomore/junior level class that introduces programming and the use of computer languages in engineering. In the remaining seven chapters we present applications of MATLAB to a wide range of engineering topics. The emphasis of the book is on using MATLAB to obtain solutions to several classes of engineering problems, not the technical subject matter per se.Therefore, the technical material is presented in summary form only and no attempt has been made to present the basic material in each of these topic areas. The book also can be used in the following ways: (1) as a companion book to junior, senior and graduate level textbooks in engineering; (2) as a reference book for obtaining numerical solutions to a wide range of engineering problems, and; (3) as a source of applications of a wide variety of MATLAB solution techniques. Engineering programming applications are typically used to do the following: (1) analyze a predictive model, such as an algebraic equation, an ordinary or partial differential equation or an approximation to these; (2) obtain statistical inferences from data; (3) visualize a model or data to enhance one's understanding; (4) either verify or obtain an empirical model from experimental results; and (5) monitor/control/analyze external events. In this book all but the last application are addressed. The presentation of the material in this book is made with the assumption that the reader can employ the engineering approach to problem solving; that is, one that uses approximate mathematical models to predict the response of elements, devices, and systems. This approach also requires that one have a good comprehension of the physical problem so that he or she can tell when the model's results are correct, or at least reasonable. These qualities are an important prerequisite to creating programs that function correctly. The book also assumes that the reader is moderately fluent in calculus and engineering mathematics. The first seven chapters are devoted to the introduction of MATLAB, where vector and matrix notation and definitions are introduced immediately and their fundamental importance to using MATLAB effectively is demonstrated. Numerous examples and detailed explanations are used to proceed through the material. The scripts and functions used to solve the example problems emphasize the employment of a relatively small number of readable MATLAB expressions to generate primarily graphical presentations of the results. This approach reinforces the importance of the vector/matrix formulations and the advantages of the resulting compactness of the code. Many of the example problems have been selected to illustrate the graphical presentation of data. The approach used in the first seven chapters is then applied in the remaining seven chapters, each of which presents the application of MATLAB solution methods and toolboxes to classes of problems in the following areas: design of machine elements, dynamics and vibrations, controls, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, optimization, and engineering statistics. The material in these chapters is illustrated by numerous MATLAB solutions to classes of problems, and includes brief discussions of the program listings and their results. Each chapter provides exercises for which many of the solutions require annotated two or three-dimensional figures. The MATLAB scripts and functions developed throughout the book use the most appropri


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