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Environmental Ethics: An Introduction to Environmental Philosophy,9780534519667
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Environmental Ethics: An Introduction to Environmental Philosophy

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780534519667

ISBN10:
0534519660
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/11/2000
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $70.00

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This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 10/11/2000.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Summary

The text serves as an introduction to ethical theory as it applies to environmental issues and as a casebook on contemporary problems of science, industry, and individual decision-making. It provides a readable, yet philosophically careful survey of the field of environmental ethics. It is comprehensive, covering topics from the relevance of Aristotle's ethics for environmental issues to Deep Ecology and Ecofeminism.

Author Biography

Joseph R. Des Jardins (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame) teaches in the Philosophy Department formed jointly by the College of St. Benedict and St. John's University

Table of Contents

Preface vii
PART I Basic Concepts 1(36)
Science, Ethics, and the Environment
2(13)
Discussion: Technological Solutions to Environmental Problems
2(3)
Introduction: Why Philosophy?
5(2)
Science and Ethics
7(4)
What is Environmental Ethics?
11(2)
Summary and Conclusions
13(2)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
13(2)
Ethical Theory and the Environment
15(22)
Discussion: Individual Rights and Social Goods
15(2)
Introduction
17(2)
Why Ethical Theory?
19(1)
Ethical Relativism
20(2)
Natural Law---The Tradition of Teleology
22(4)
The Utilitarian Tradition
26(3)
Deontology: An Ethics of Duty and Rights
29(2)
Social Justice and Property Rights
31(3)
Summary and Conclusions
34(3)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
34(3)
PART II Environmental Ethics as Applied Ethics 37(90)
Ethics and Economics: The Cases of Forests and Pollution
38(29)
Discussion: Development Versus Preservation
38(2)
Introduction
40(1)
Forests: Conservation or Preservation?
41(2)
Managing the National Forests
43(5)
Pollution and Economics
48(3)
Ethical Issues in Economic Analysis
51(2)
Cost-Benefit Analysis
53(2)
Ethical Analysis and Environmental Economics
55(5)
Sustainable Economics
60(2)
Summary and Conclusions
62(5)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
63(4)
Responsibilities to Future Generations: Population and Consumption
67(26)
Discussion: Population and Consumption
67(2)
Introduction
69(1)
Population, Consumption, and Ethics
69(3)
Do We Have Responsibilitis to Future Generations?
72(4)
Responsibilities to the Future: Utilitarian Happiness
76(3)
Responsibilities to the Future: The Rights of Future People
79(3)
Responsibilities to the Future: Caring for the Future
82(4)
Do We Consume Too Much?
86(2)
Conclusion: Sustainable Living---Now and in the Future
88(5)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
89(4)
Responsibilities to the Natural World: From Anthropocentric to Nonanthropocentric Ethics
93(19)
Discussion: Mass Extinctions
93(2)
Introduction
95(1)
Moral Standing in the Western Tradition
95(3)
Early Environmental Ethics: Passmore and Blackstone
98(5)
Moral Standing: The Recent Debate
103(3)
Do Trees Have Standing?
106(2)
Summary and Conclusions
108(4)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
109(3)
Responsibilities to the Natural World: The Case for Animals
112(15)
Discussion: Animal Research and Factory Farming
112(2)
Introduction
114(1)
Peter Singer and the Animal Liberation Movement
114(2)
Tom Regan and Animal Rights
116(2)
Ethical Implications of Animal Welfare
118(1)
Criticisms
119(4)
Summary and Conclusions
123(4)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
124(3)
PART III Theories of Environmental Ethics 127(135)
Biocentric Ethics and the Inherent Value of Life
128(24)
Discussion: Biodiversity
128(1)
Introduction
129(2)
Instrumental Value and Instrinsic Value
131(4)
Biocentric Ethics and the Reverence for Life
135(2)
Ethics and Character
137(2)
Taylor's Biocentric Ethics
139(4)
Practical Implications
143(2)
Challenges and Developments
145(3)
Summary and Conclusions
148(4)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
149(3)
Ecology, Wilderness, and Ethics
152(29)
Discussion: Fires and Wilderness Management: The Cases of Yellowstone and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness
152(3)
Introduction
155(1)
The Wilderness Ideal
156(5)
The Wilderness ``Myth'': The Contemporary Debate
161(6)
From Ecology to Philosophy
167(7)
From Ecology to Ethics
174(2)
Varieties of Holism
176(1)
Summary and Conclusions
177(4)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
178(3)
The Land Ethic
181(29)
Discussion: A Place for Predators
181(3)
Introduction
184(2)
The Land Ethic
186(4)
Leopold's Holism
190(2)
Criticisms of the Land Ethic: Facts and Values
192(3)
Criticisms of the Land Ethic: Holistic Ethics
195(6)
Callicott's Revisions
201(5)
Summary and Conclusions
206(4)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
206(4)
Deep Ecology
210(22)
Discussion: Environmental Activism: Legal and Illegal
210(3)
Introduction
213(1)
The Deep Ecology Platform
214(1)
Ecology and Ecophilosophy
215(2)
Metaphysical Ecology
217(3)
From Metaphysics to Ethics
220(4)
Self-Realization and Biocentric Equality
224(3)
Criticisms
227(2)
Summary and Conclusions
229(3)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
229(3)
Social Ecology and Ecofeminism
232(30)
Discussion: The World Bank Memo and the Chipko Movement
232(3)
Introduction
235(2)
Theories of Social Justice
237(3)
Environmental Justice and Environmental Racism
240(3)
Murray Bookchin's Social Ecology
243(3)
Critical Reflections
246(3)
Ecofeminism: Making Connections
249(4)
Ecofeminism: Recent Developments
253(3)
Summary and Conclusions
256(6)
Notes, Discussion Questions, and Further Reading
257(5)
Epilogue Pluralism and Pragmatism 262(11)
Index 273


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