9781137345387

Eros and Socratic Political Philosophy

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781137345387

  • ISBN10:

    1137345381

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2013-07-25
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $100.00 Save up to $3.00
  • Buy New
    $97.00
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    PRINT ON DEMAND: 2-4 WEEKS. THIS ITEM CANNOT BE CANCELLED OR RETURNED.

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Eros and Socratic Political Philosophy offers a new account of Plato's view of eros, or romantic love, by focusing on a question which has vexed many scholars: why does Plato's Socrates praise eros highly on some occasions but also criticize it harshly on others? Through detailed analyses of Plato's Republic, Phaedrus, and Symposium, Levy shows how, despite the apparent tensions between Socrates' statements about eros in each dialogue, these statements supplement each other well and serve to clarify Socrates' understanding of the complex relationship between eros, religious belief, and philosophy. Thus, Levy's interpretation sheds new light not only on Plato's view of eros, but also on his view of piety and philosophy, challenging common assumptions about the erotic nature of Socratic philosophy. This novel approach to classic political theory will incite discussion and interest among scholars of classics, philosophy, and political theory.

Author Biography

David Levy is currently a visiting-tutor at St. John's College, Santa Fe, USA. He received a master's degree in philosophy from Penn State in 2003 and his PhD in political science from Boston College in 2010.

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. The Republic's Blame of Eros
2. The Phaedrus' Praise and Blame of Eros
3. Socrates' Symposium Speech
Conclusion

Rewards Program

Write a Review