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Essential Skills in Family Therapy : From the First Interview to Termination,9781572303072

Essential Skills in Family Therapy : From the First Interview to Termination

by ; ; ;
ISBN13:

9781572303072

ISBN10:
1572303077
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
3/20/1998
Publisher(s):
The Guilford Press
List Price: $42.67
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  • Essential Skills in Family Therapy, Second Edition : From the First Interview to Termination
    Essential Skills in Family Therapy, Second Edition : From the First Interview to Termination




Summary

An ideal introduction to practicing family therapy, this work provides students and new therapists with the basic skills and tools necessary to become empathic, confident, and successful practitioners in today's rapidly changing field of mental health. Written from a biopsychosocial perspective, chapters take readers step by step through the entire therapy process. Numerous case examples and recent research findings complement the text, and special sections on getting started, gaining self-confidence, diagnosing DSM-IV disorders, and understanding managed care offer practical guidance for entering the field.

Author Biography

JoEllen Patterson, PhD, is Director of the COAMFTE-approved Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling Program at the University of San Diego and serves on the Behavioral Science faculty of Sharp HealthCare's Family Practice Residency. Her publications focus primarily on training and integration of mental health services with healthcare delivery systems.

Lee Williams, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling Program at the University of San Diego. A licensed family therapist and an Approved Supervisor of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy, Dr. Williams has published articles on topics including premarital counseling, family therapy training, and supervision.

Claudia Grauf-Grounds, PhD, teaches in the Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling Program at the University of San Diego. She also serves on the Behavioral Science faculty of Sharp HealthCare's Family Practice Residency and is Director of San Diego's New Life Clinics, a multidisciplinary mental health practice.

Larry Chamow, PhD, has been a practicing family therapist for 18 years. He serves on the faculties of the Marital and Family Therapy Program, University of San Diego, and the California School of Professional Psychology. An Approved Supervisor of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy and a member of the American Family Therapy Academy, he conducts his private practice at the Pacific Family Institute in Carlsbad, California.

Table of Contents

1. The Beginning Family Therapist: Taking on the Challenge
1(10)
Getting Started
4(1)
Managing Anxiety and Issues of Confidence
5(1)
Stages of Therapist Development
6(3)
Obsessing about Clinical Work
9(1)
Conclusion
9(2)
2. Before the Initial Interview
11(10)
Dealing with Families' Expectations and Anxieties about Therapy
11(2)
Suggestions for Initial Contact with the Client
13(2)
What Information Should Be Obtained?
15(3)
Who Should Come to Therapy?
18(1)
Initial Hypothesizing
19(2)
3. The Initial Interview
21(15)
Developing a Connection: How to Join with Clients
21(2)
Establishing Credibility
23(2)
Defining Client Expectations for Therapy
25(3)
Building Motivation
28(2)
Handling Administrative Issues
30(4)
Conclusion: The First Session and Beyond
34(2)
4. Guidelines for Conducting Assessment
36(33)
Initial Assessment
37(2)
Potential Issues of Harm
39(9)
Assessing for Substance Abuse
48(4)
Assessing for Biological Factors
52(2)
General Psychosocial Assessment
54(14)
Conclusion
68(1)
5. Developing a Treatment Focus
69(28)
Developing an Initial Treatment Plan
69(2)
Select a Problem List
71(1)
Examine History of Problems and Previous/Current Treatment
72(1)
Conceptualize the Case and Make a Diagnosis Using a DSM-IV Multiaxial Assessment
72(8)
Establish Long-Term Treatment Goals
80(2)
Select Treatment Modality, Objectives, and Interventions
82(3)
Determine Length and Frequency of Treatment
85(3)
Consider Referrals to Outside Resources
88(7)
Conclusion
95(2)
6. Basic Treatment Skills
97(21)
The Rush to Intervention versus Developing a Relationship
97(3)
Basic Counseling Skills
100(8)
The Development of Expertise as a Family Therapist
108(10)
7. Working with Families and Children
118(29)
Assessment of Child and Adolescent Disorders
119(2)
Family Interventions When Children Are the Clients
121(3)
The Family Life Cycle Revisited
124(16)
Special Issues with Divorcing and Remarried Families
140(4)
Mediation and Child Custody Evaluations
144(1)
Special Issues with Single-Parent Poor Families
145(2)
8. Working with Couples
147(22)
Keys to Providing Solid Couple Therapy
148(1)
Creating a Therapeutic Triangle
149(6)
When Couple Therapy Might Not Work
155(1)
Common Problems Presented in Couple Therapy
155(3)
Longitudinal Research on Couples
158(3)
Special Topics
161(6)
Structured Separation
167(2)
9. When a Family Member Has a Mental Illness
169(24)
Individual and Family Concepts
169(3)
Individual Diagnosis in a Family Context
172(2)
Depression
174(7)
Anxiety
181(5)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse
186(7)
10. Getting Unstuck in Therapy
193(23)
Understanding Clients' Ambivalence about Change
194(1)
Therapist's Reluctance to Intervene
195(1)
Therapist-Client Agenda and Timing Mismatch
196(2)
Therapist's Lack of Theoretical Clarity
198(1)
Supervision
199(1)
Self-Supervision Questions
200(1)
Peer Consultation
200(1)
Doing a Literature Search
200(1)
Dealing with Cancellations and "No Shows"
201(5)
Difficulty Getting Other Family Members to Therapy
206(1)
Handling Secrets
207(1)
How Agencies Contribute to Being Stuck
208(3)
Countertransference: How Therapist's Issues Interfere
211(3)
Other Personal Influences
214(2)
11. Termination
216(9)
Mutual Terminations
217(4)
Therapist Terminations
221(1)
Client Terminations
222(3)
12. Family Therapy in the Future: Pertinent Issues for Beginning Clinicians
225(10)
Managed Care: Implications for You and Your Clients
226(1)
What Every Family Therapist Needs to Know
227(4)
The Question That Binds: What Harms and What Helps?
231(4)
References 235(8)
Index 243


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