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Essentials of Circuit Analysis

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780130616555

ISBN10:
0130616559
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
9/24/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $162.60
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Summary

Created to highlight and detail its most important concepts, this book is a major revision of the author¿s ownIntroductory Circuit Analysis,completely rewritten to bestow users with the knowledge and skills that should be mastered when learning about dc/ac circuits.KEY TOPICSSpecific chapter topics include Current and Voltage; Resistance; Ohm¿s Law, Power and Energy; Series de Circuits; Parallel de Circuits; Series-Parallel Circuits; Methods of Analysis and Selected Topics(dc); Network Theorems; Capacitors; Inductors; Sinusoidal Alternating Waveforms; The Basic Elements and Phasors; Series and Parallel AC Circuits; Series-Parallel AC Networks and the Power Triangle; AC Methods of Analysis and Theorems; Resonance and Filters; Transformers and Three-Phase Systems; and Pulse Waveforms and the Non-sinusoidal Response.For practicing technicians and engineers.

Author Biography

The inspiration for this one-of-a-kind text grew from Bob Boylestad's desire to provide students with a comprehensive learning tool that hones in on the most important circuit analysis concepts in an exciting and fresh manner. This same vision has resulted in a completely new publishing endeavor by the author and Prentice Hall—a text that delivers all of the essential knowledge a student should carry away from an introductory DC/AC circuits course in one concise, practical, engaging volume.

Ancillaries written for this text include:
  • Experiments in Circuit Analysis, a lab manual
  • Lab Solutions Manual
  • Text Solutions Manual
  • Prentice Hall TestGen, a computerized test bank
  • PowerPoint® Transparencies
  • Companion Website, http://www.prenhall.com/boylestad
  • Electronics Supersite, http://www.prenhall.com/electronics

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: Introduction 1(32)
OBJECTIVES
1(1)
1.1 The Electrical-Electronics Industry
1(1)
1.2 A Brief History
2(4)
1.3 Units of Measurement
6(1)
1.4 Systems of Units
7(2)
1.5 Powers of Ten
9(5)
1.6 Conversion between Levels of Powers of Ten
14(1)
1.7 Conversion within and between Systems of Units
15(2)
1.8 Symbols
17(1)
1.9 Conversion Tables
17(1)
1.10 Calculators
18(3)
1.11 Computer Analysis
21(2)
1.12 Computer (PC) Specifications
23(10)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 2: Current and Voltage 33(27)
OBJECTIVES
33(1)
2.1 Introduction
33(1)
2.2 Atoms and Their Structure
34(1)
2.3 Voltage
35(2)
2.4 Current
37(3)
2.5 Voltage Sources
40(5)
2.6 Ampere-Hour Rating
45(1)
2.7 Battery Life Factors
45(2)
2.8 Conductors and Insulators
47(2)
2.9 Semiconductors
49(1)
2.10 Ammeters and Voltmeters
49(1)
2.11 Applications
50(5)
2.12 Computer Analysis
55(5)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 3: Resistance 60(31)
OBJECTIVES
60(1)
3.1 Introduction
60(1)
3.2 Resistance
61(3)
3.3 Wire Tables
64(3)
3.4 Temperature Effects
67(3)
3.5 Superconductors
70(3)
3.6 Types of Resistors
73(4)
3.7 Color Coding and Standard Resistor Values
77(2)
3.8 Conductance
79(1)
3.9 Ohmmeters
80(1)
3.10 Applications
81(3)
3.11 Mathcad
84(7)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 4: Ohm's Law, Power, and Energy 91(27)
OBJECTIVES
91(1)
4.1 Introduction
91(1)
4.2 Ohm's Law
91(3)
4.3 Power
94(2)
4.4 Energy
96(3)
4.5 Efficiency
99(3)
4.6 Plotting Ohm's Law
102(3)
4.7 Circuit Breakers, GFCIs, and Fuses
105(1)
4.8 Application
106(2)
4.9 Computer Analysis
108(10)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 5: Series dc Circuits 118(48)
OBJECTIVES
118(1)
5.1 Introduction
118(1)
5.2 Series Resistors
118(4)
5.3 Series Circuits
122(7)
5.4 Power Distribution in a Series Circuit
129(1)
5.5 Voltage Sources in Series
130(2)
5.6 Kirchhoff's Voltage Law
132(3)
5.7 Voltage Division in a Series Circuit
135(5)
5.8 Voltage Regulation and the Internal Resistance of Voltage Sources
140(4)
5.9 Loading Effects of Instruments
144(1)
5.10 Protoboards (Breadboards)
145(1)
5.11 Applications
146(4)
5.12 Computer Analysis
150(16)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 6: Parallel dc Circuits 166(48)
OBJECTIVES
166(1)
6.1 Introduction
166(1)
6.2 Parallel Resistors
166(9)
6.3 Parallel Circuits
175(6)
6.4 Power Distribution in a Parallel Circuit
181(2)
6.5 Kirchhoft's Current Law
183(5)
6.6 Current Divider Rule
188(5)
6.7 Voltage Sources in Parallel
193(1)
6.8 Voltmeter Loading Effects
193(2)
6.9 Protoboards (Breadboards)
195(1)
6.10 Applications
196(4)
6.11 Computer Analysis
200(14)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 7: Series-Parallel Circuits 214(45)
OBJECTIVES
214(1)
7.1 Introduction
214(1)
7.2 Series-Parallel Networks
215(1)
7.3 Reduce and Return Approach
216(4)
7.4 Descriptive Examples
220(5)
7.5 Notation
225(4)
7.6 Applying the Special Notation
229(3)
7.7 Ladder Networks
232(3)
7.8 Voltage Divider Supply (Unloaded and Loaded)
235(2)
7.9 Potentiometer Loading
237(3)
7.10 Open and Short Circuits
240(4)
7.11 Application
244(3)
7.12 Computer Analysis
247(12)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 8: Methods of Analysis and Selected Topics (dc) 259(71)
OBJECTIVES
259(1)
8.1 Introduction
259(1)
8.2 Current Sources
260(2)
8.3 Source Conversions
262(2)
8.4 Current Sources in Parallel
264(1)
8.5 Branch-Current Analysis
265(7)
8.6 Mesh Analysis (General Approach)
272(8)
8.7 Mesh Analysis (Format Approach)
280(7)
8.8 Nodal Analysis (Genera) Approach)
287(8)
8.9 Nodal Analysis (Format Approach)
295(6)
8.10 Special Cases for Mesh and Nodal Analysis
301(6)
8.11 Bridge Networks
307(3)
8.12 Δ-Y and Y-Δ Conversions
310(4)
8.13 Applications
314(3)
8.14 Computer Analysis
317(13)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATONS
PROBLEMS GLOSSARY
CHAPTER 9: Network Theorems 330(47)
OBJECTIVES
330(1)
9.1 Introduction
330(1)
9.2 Superposition Theorem
330(7)
9.3 Thévenin's Theorem
337(14)
9.4 Maximum Power Transfer Theorem
351(8)
9.5 Norton's Theorem
359(4)
9.6 Application
363(3)
9.7 Computer Analysis
366(11)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 10: Capacitors 377(60)
OBJECTIVES
377(1)
10.1 Introduction
377(1)
10.2 The Electric Field
377(1)
10.3 Capacitance
378(4)
10.4 Capacitors
382(11)
10.5 Transients in Capacitive Networks: The Charging Phase
393(7)
10.6 Transients in Capacitive Networks: The Discharging Phase
400(6)
10.7 Initial Conditions
406(2)
10.8 Instantaneous Values
408(2)
10.9 Thévenin Equivalent: T = RThC
410(3)
10.10 The Current ic
413(2)
10.11 Capacitors in Series and in Parallel
415(5)
10.12 Energy Stored by a Capacitor
420(1)
10.13 Stray Capacitances
421(1)
10.14 Application
421(3)
10.15 Computer Analysis
424(13)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 11: Inductors 437(48)
OBJECTIVES
437(1)
11.1 Introduction
437(1)
11.2 The Magnetic Field
438(4)
11.3 Inductance
442(7)
11.4 The Voltage VL
449(2)
11.5 R-L Transients: The Storage Phase
451(3)
11.6 Initial Conditions
454(2)
11.7 R-L Transients: The Release Phase
456(5)
11.8 Thévenin Equivalent: T = L/RTh
461(2)
11.9 Instantaneous Values
463(1)
11.10 Average Induced Voltage: VLav
464(1)
11.11 Inductors in Series and in Parallel
465(1)
11.12 Steady-State Conditions
466(2)
11.13 Energy Stored by an Inductor
468(1)
11.14 Applications
469(3)
11.15 Computer Analysis
472(13)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 12. Sinusoidal Alternating Waveforms 485(66)
OBJECTIVES
485(1)
12.1 Introduction
485(1)
12.2 Sinusoidal ac Voltage Characteristics and Definitions
486(3)
12.3 Frequency Spectrum
489(2)
12.4 The Sinusoidal Waveform
491(4)
12.5 General Format for the Sinusoidal Voltage or Current
495(4)
12.6 Phase Relations
499(5)
12.7 Average Value
504(6)
12.8 Effective (rms) Values
510(5)
12.9 ac Meters and Instruments
515(3)
12.10 Applications
518(2)
12.11 Computer Analysis
520(31)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 13: The Basic Elements and Phasors 551(32)
OBJECTIVES
531(1)
13.1 Introduction
531(1)
13.2 Adding and Subtracting Sinusoidal Waveforms
531(3)
13.3 Complex Numbers
534(3)
13.4 Mathematical Operations with Complex Numbers
537(7)
13.5 Applying Kirchhoff's Laws Using Phasor Notation
544(3)
13.6 Resistors and the ac Response
547(4)
13.7 Inductors and the ac Response
551(5)
13.8 Capacitors and the ac Response
556(4)
13.9 Power and the Basic Elements
560(4)
13.10 Frequency Response of the Basic Elements
564(6)
13.11 Computer Analysis
570(13)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 14: Series and Parallel ac Circuits 583(57)
OBJECTIVES
583(1)
14.1 Introduction
583(1)
14.2 Series Configuration
583(6)
14.3 Average Power and the Power Factor
589(5)
14.4 Voltage Divider Rule
594(4)
14.5 Frequency Response for Series ac Circuits
598(6)
14.6 Summary: Series ac Circuits
604(1)
14.7 Parallel Configuration
605(8)
14.8 Current Divider Rule
613(1)
14.9 Frequency Response of Parallel Elements
614(5)
14.10 Summary: Parallel ac Networks
619(1)
14.11 Phase Measurements
619(3)
14.12 Admittance and Susceptance
622(4)
14.13 Application
626(1)
14.14 Computer Analysis
627(13)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 15: SeriesParallel ac Networks and the Power Triangle 640(36)
OBJECTIVES
640(1)
15.1 Introduction
640(1)
15.2 Series-Parallel ac Networks
640(10)
15.3 Ladder Networks
650(1)
15.4 The Power Triangle
651(5)
15.5 Power-Factor Correction
656(3)
15.6 Power Meters
659(1)
15.7 Grounding
659(3)
15.8 Application
662(2)
15.9 Computer Analysis
664(12)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 16: ac Methods of Analysis and Theorems 676(50)
OBJECTIVES
676(1)
16.1 Introduction
676(1)
16.2 Source Conversions
676(2)
16.3 Mesh Analysis
678(5)
16.4 Nodal Analysis
683(7)
16.5 Bridge Networks
690(2)
16.6 Δ-Y and Y-Δ Conversions
692(3)
16.7 Superposition Theorem
695(5)
16.8 Thévenin's Theorem
700(3)
16.9 Norton's Theorem
703(3)
16.10 Maximum Power Transfer Theorem
706(4)
16.11 Computer Analysis
710(16)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 17: Resonance and Filters 726(63)
OBJECTIVES
726(1)
17.1 Introduction
726(1)
17.2 Series Resonant Circuit
727(7)
17.3 Examples (Series Resonance)
734(3)
17.4 Parallel Resonant Circuit
737(5)
17.5 Examples (Parallel Resonance)
742
17.6 Logarithms
741(8)
17.7 Properties of Logarithms
749(1)
17.8 Decibels
750(4)
17.9 Filters
754(2)
17.10 R-C Low-Pass Filter
756(3)
17.11 R-C High-Pass Filter
759(3)
17.12 Pass-Band Filters
762(4)
17.13 Stop-Band Filters
766(1)
17.14 Double Tuned Filters
767
17.15 dB Plots
168(603)
17.16 Applications
771(3)
11.17 Computer Analysis
774(15)
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Chapter 18: Transformers and Three-Phase Systems 789
OBJECTIVES
789(1)
18.1 Introduction
789(1)
18.2 Iron-Core Transformer
790(8)
18.3 Three-Phase Systems
798(1)
18.4 The Three-Phase Generator
799(1)
18.5 The Y-Connected Generator
800(1)
18.6 Phase Sequence (Y-Connected Generator)
801(1)
18.7 The Y-Connected Generator with a Y-Connected Load
801(2)
18.8 The Y-Δ System
803(2)
18.9 The Δ-Connected Generator
805(1)
18.10 The Δ-Δ,Δ-Y Three-Phase Systems
806(2)
18.11 Power
808(4)
18.12 Power and Phase-Sequence Measurements
812(4)
18.13 Unbalanced, Three-Phase, Four-Wire, Y-Connected Load
816(1)
18.14 Applications
817(3)
18.15 Computer Analysis
820
CHAPTER SUMMARY
IMPORTANT EQUATIONS
PROBLEMS
GLOSSARY
Appendixes A-1
A Conversion Factors
A-2
B PSpice, Electronics Workbench, and Mathcad
A-5
C Determinants
A-7
D Color Coding of Molded Tubular Capacitors (Picofarads)
A-14
E The Greek Alphabet
A-15
F Magnetic Parameter Conversions
A-16
G Maximum Power Transfer Conditions
A-17
H Answers to Selected Odd-Numbered Problems
A-19
Index A-29

Excerpts

Current and past users ofIntroductory Circuit Analysis(ICA), now in its tenth edition, have a right to wonder why I have chosen to write another text on essentially the same subject matter. The reason lies in my belief that there has been a growing need in recent years for a text dedicated primarily to those concepts that a graduate of this program of study must retain in order to be successful in the industrial community. In other words, a text is needed that has an increased measure of detail in specific important areas to ensure a clear, correct understanding of the most important laws and concepts, with less concern for special cases and material of less importance. The goal has been to create a text with a more practical orientation to better prepare the student for the laboratory and real-world experience. Admittedly, in comparing the tables of contents of the two texts, one can immediately see that there is a close correspondence in content (although numerous sections are moved and a number of chapters are combined). This correspondence, however, should not suggest that this text is merely a cut-and-paste revision of the ICA text. In fact, as I worked through the copyedited pages of this new text, I realized how little of the original ICA presentation remains. Except for the practical examples and the computer coverage, the books are very different. If you examine any section of particular interest, you will find that the pace, level of presentation, and content ofEssentials of Circuit Analysisare all different from those of the ICA text.From the very beginning, I decided that any cut-and-paste approach simply would not work. I examined each topic, decided what was really important, and wrote the corresponding sections in almost exactly the same way that I might teach the subject in the classroom. I believe that the differences between ICA and this text are evident immediately in just leafing through the pages.Essentials of Circuit Analysistruly has an exciting new appearance that invites examination and further investigation.This text includes the actual construction of numerous networks to help define how a circuit diagram is drawn. Meters are also included throughout the text to maintain a close link with real-world experience. Methods of analysis are simplified by removing concern about special cases. Controlled sources are not included, while subjects such as Bode plots are included but are only touched upon rather than covered in depth. Theorems such as the substitution theorem, Millman's theorem, and the reciprocity theorem are eliminated in favor of giving more coverage to more important concepts. As a developmental aid, a list of objectives is introduced at the beginning of each chapter, and a chapter summary list and an equation list are added to the end of each chapter. The format of the text is designed to ensure that students are aware of the concepts they should take away from the course. All of the artwork utilizes color and shading to clarify the analysis being described, and many new photos are added. Each problem section is written to complement the content and level of coverage presented, progressing from the simple to the complex within each section, with emphasis on developing a student's confidence before moving on to the more complex problems. FEATURESImportant changes in content begin in Chapter 1 and progress throughout the entire text. Chapter 1 includes expanded coverage of the proper use of calculators. As confident as students might appear in their use of the calculator, they continue to generate impossible results because they do not know the correct operating sequences. Section 1.12 describes in detail the specifications provided with a computer. This general information about a computer system is provided so that users of a computer can understand its capabilities and its limitations.Throughout the introductory chapters, new sect


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