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Essentials of Logic

by ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780132380348

ISBN10:
013238034X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/17/2006
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $140.00

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Summary

Rendered from the 11th Edition of Copi/Cohen,Introduction to Logic, the most respected introductory logic book on the market, this concise version presents a simplified yet rigorous introduction to the study of logic.It covers all major topics and approaches, using a three-part organization that outlines specific topics under logic and language, deduction, and induction.For individuals intrigued by the formal study of logic.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Acknowledgments xi
Basic Logical Concepts
1(45)
What Logic Is
1(1)
Propositions and Sentences
1(2)
Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions
3(4)
Arguments and Explanations
7(5)
Recognizing Arguments
12(12)
Premise- and Conclusion-Indicators
12(4)
Arguments in Context
16(1)
Premises Not in Declarative Form
16(2)
Unstated Propositions
18(6)
Deduction and Validity
24(1)
Validity and Truth
25(4)
Induction and Probability
29(2)
Analyzing Arguments
31(5)
Paraphrasing
31(1)
Diagramming Arguments
32(2)
Interwoven Arguments
34(2)
Complex Argumentative Passages
36(10)
Essentials of Chapter 1
43(3)
Informal Fallacies
46(54)
What Is a Fallacy?
46(2)
Fallacies of Relevance
48(19)
Argument from Ignorance (argumentum ad ignoratiam)
48(3)
Appeal to Illegitimate Authority (argumentum ad verecundiam)
51(3)
Argument Against the Person (Personal Attack, argumentum ad hominem)
54(3)
Appeal to Emotion (Mob Appeal, argumentum ad populum)
57(1)
Appeal to Pity (argumentum ad misericordiam)
58(1)
Appeal to Force (argumentum ad baculum)
59(1)
Irrelevant Conclusion (ignoratio elenchi; non sequitur)
60(7)
Fallacies of Presumption
67(12)
Complex Question
67(1)
False Cause (post hoe, ergo propter hoc; non causa pro causa)
68(2)
Begging the Question (petitio principii)
70(1)
Accident
71(2)
Converse Accident (Hasty Generalization)
73(1)
Suppressed Evidence
74(1)
False Dichotomy
75(4)
Fallacies of Ambiguity
79(21)
Equivocation
79(1)
Amphiboly
80(2)
Accent
82(1)
Composition
83(2)
Division
85(12)
Essentials of Chapter 2
97(3)
Categorical Propositions
100(36)
Categorical Logic
100(1)
Categorical Propositions and Classes
101(5)
Symbolism and Venn Diagrams for Categorical Propositions
106(4)
Distribution
110(3)
Existential Import
113(2)
The Aristotelian Square of Opposition and Immediate Inferences
115(7)
Contradictories
116(1)
Contraries
116(1)
Subcontraries
117(1)
Subalternation
118(4)
The Boolean Square of Opposition
122(1)
Logical Equivalence and Immediate Inferences
123(13)
Conversion
123(2)
Obversion
125(3)
Contraposition
128(5)
Essentials of Chapter 3
133(3)
Categorical Syllogisms
136(28)
Standard Form Categorical Syllogisms
136(5)
Major, Minor, and Middle Terms
136(1)
Mood
137(1)
Figure
138(3)
The Nature of Syllogistic Arguments
141(2)
Venn Diagram Technique for Testing Syllogisms
143(9)
Syllogistic Rules and Syllogistic Fallacies
152(12)
Essentials of Chapter 4
161(3)
Arguments in Ordinary Language
164(27)
Syllogistic Arguments in Ordinary Language
164(1)
Reducing the Number of Terms in a Syllogistic Argument
165(3)
Translating Categorical Propositions into Standard Form
168(14)
Singular Propositions
169(2)
Categorical Propositions with Adjectives or Adjectival Phrases as Predicates
171(1)
Categorical Propositions with Verbs Other Than the Standard Form Copula To Be
172(1)
Categorical Propositions in Nonstandard Order
173(1)
Categorical Propositions with Nonstandard Quantifiers
174(1)
Exclusive Propositions
175(2)
Propositions Without Quantifiers
177(1)
Propositions Not in Standard Form that Have Logically Equivalent Standard Form Alternatives
177(1)
Exceptive Propositions
178(1)
More Complex Quantifiers
179(3)
Uniform Translation
182(2)
Enthymemes
184(7)
Essentials of Chapter 5
190(1)
Symbolic Logic
191(53)
The Symbolic Language of Modern Logic
191(1)
Symbolese 101: The Language of Propositional Logic
192(16)
Negation
193(1)
Conjunction
194(1)
Disjunction
195(1)
Material Implication (Material Conditionality)
196(1)
Biconditionals (Material Equivalence)
197(1)
Grouping Indicators
197(11)
Truth Tables as Tools for Analyzing Compound Propositions
208(7)
Tautologous, Contradictory, and Contingent Statement Forms
215(6)
Truth Tables as a Test for the Validity of Arguments
221(12)
Some Common Valid Argument Forms
225(2)
Some Common Invalid Argument Forms
227(1)
More Complex Arguments
228(5)
Incomplete and Reverse Truth Tables
233(8)
Incomplete Truth Tables
233(2)
Reverse Truth Tables
235(6)
Arguments, Conditionals, and Tautologies
241(3)
Essentials of Chapter 6
241(3)
The Method of Deduction
244(51)
Natural Deduction Versus Truth Tables
244(1)
Formal Proofs of Validity
245(12)
The Rule of Replacement (1)
257(8)
The Rule of Replacement (2)
265(15)
Conditional Proof
280(5)
Indirect Proof
285(10)
Essentials of Chapter 7
293(2)
Quantification Theory
295(35)
When Propositional Logic Is Not Enough
295(1)
Symbolese 102: The Language of Quantificational Logic
296(10)
Singular Propositions, Subjects, and Predicates
296(2)
Universal and Particular Propositions
298(2)
And Sometimes the Statements Are More Complex
300(6)
Proving Validity
306(10)
Conditional and Indirect Proof
316(5)
Proving Invalidity
321(9)
Essentials of Chapter 8
329(1)
Induction
330(41)
Introduction to Induction
330(4)
Arguments by Analogy
334(5)
Appraising Arguments by Analogy
339(8)
Explanations and Hypotheses
347(7)
Arguments to the Best Explanation
354(17)
Essentials of Chapter 9
367(4)
Appendix: Truth Trees
371(12)
Propositional Logic
371(6)
Quantificational Logic
377(6)
Essentials of the Appendix
382(1)
Solutions to the Odd-Numbered Problems 383(56)
Glossary/Index 439


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