CART

(0) items

Essentials of Soil Mechanics and Foundations : Basic Geotechnics,9780130303837
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Essentials of Soil Mechanics and Foundations : Basic Geotechnics

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780130303837

ISBN10:
0130303836
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL

Related Products


  • Essentials of Soil Mechanics and Foundations Basic Geotechnics
    Essentials of Soil Mechanics and Foundations Basic Geotechnics





Summary

For undergraduate courses in Civil Engineering Technology and Civil Technology, Environmental Engineering, Construction Management, Architectural Engineering and all other applications-oriented engineering courses in Soil Mechanics/Foundations, Soils Engineering, and Geotechnical Engineering. Written by an experienced professor/practitioner, this popular introductory book provides coverage on a broad range of state-of-the-art geotechnics material accepted and used by today's engineering professionals. Easy to understand and loaded with illustrative examples, it explores everything from the most basic of concepts to the latest developments, giving students a real-life working knowledge of soil mechanics and foundations. The philosophy and logic of soils and foundations is discussed in practical terms to enhance understanding, and a presentation of design charts, tables, and equationsutilized by today's practitionersencompasses not just the nuts and bolts, but explicit instructions and applications as well.

Table of Contents

PART I BACKGROUND AND BASICS 1(214)
The Soil and Rock of Planet Earth: Geologic Overview
3(64)
Rock: The Source of Soils
4(4)
Soil Categories: Transported, Residual
8(18)
Transported Soils
10(11)
Residual Soils
21(5)
Soil Gases and Liquids
26(1)
Plate Tectonics
26(9)
Earthquakes
35(28)
Effect on Design and Construction
63(4)
Problems
64(3)
Soil Composition: Terminology and Definitions
67(16)
Soil Composition: Analytical Representation
67(3)
Weight-Volume, Mass-Volume Relationship
68(2)
Basic Terms Relating to Soil Composition and Condition
70(8)
Submerged Soil
78(5)
Problems
81(2)
Soil Types and Soil Structure
83(21)
Major Soil Types
83(2)
Particle Shapes and Sizes
85(3)
Clay and Water
88(4)
Soil Structure
92(4)
Some Special Soil Categories
96(8)
Collapsible Soils
97(1)
Liquefaction
97(1)
Expansive Clays
98(2)
Dispersive Clays
100(1)
Laterites
101(1)
Problems
102(2)
Index Properties and Classification Tests, and Soil Classification Systems
104(40)
Index Properties
105(1)
Classification Tests
106(16)
Particle Size Distribution (Mechanical Analysis)
106(5)
In-Place Density, In-Place Unit Weight
111(1)
Relative Density
112(2)
Water Content
114(1)
Consistency of Clays
115(2)
Consistency in the Remolded State and Plasticity
117(2)
Presence of Clay Minerals
119(1)
Testing for Dispersive Clays
120(2)
Other Properties
122(1)
ASTM and AASHTO Test Procedure Designations
122(1)
Classification Systems
122(11)
Application to Transported Soil Deposits and Residual Soil Formations
133(2)
Soil Taxonomy--Global Soil Orders
135(9)
Problems
142(2)
Site Investigations: Purpose and Methods, Information and Procedures Available
144(71)
Maps and Aerial Photographs as Sources of Information
146(3)
Borings and Test Pits
149(15)
Boring Methods
150(5)
Soil Sampling
155(5)
Sample Spacing in Soil Borings
160(1)
Boring Spacing and Depth
160(1)
Rock Core Drilling
161(2)
Test Pits
163(1)
Soil Resistance Testing in Boreholes
164(9)
Penetration Resistance and the Standard Penetration Test
164(4)
SPT Modifications
168(2)
Penetration Resistance and Cone Penetrometers
170(3)
Presentation of Boring Information
173(5)
Boring Logs
173(3)
Recognizing Limitations of Boring Data
176(2)
In-Place Testing
178(11)
In-Place Shear Tests--Vane Shear
178(1)
Slope Inclination Indicator
179(2)
Pore Pressure and Piezometers
181(2)
Dilatometer and Pressuremeter Tests
183(6)
Groundwater, Soil Water, and Soil Gas Sampling
189(10)
Geophysical Methods
199(16)
Seismic Refraction
199(5)
Electrical Resistivity
204(5)
Correlation between Resistivity and Earth Materials
209(1)
Thickness of Layers
210(1)
Ground-Penetrating Radar
210(2)
Problems
212(3)
PART II ENGINEERING PROPERTIES AND BEHAVIOR OF SOIL DEPOSITS 215(226)
Movement of Water Through Soil: Basic Hydrogeology, Subsurface Flow, Permeability, Capillarity
217(33)
Basic Hydrogeology
218(4)
Subsurface Flow, Basic Facts
218(4)
Permeability (Hydraulic Conductivity)
222(15)
Factors Affecting Flow
222(5)
Darcy's Law for Flow
227(2)
Laminar and Turbulent Flow
229(1)
Effect of Soil Type
229(1)
Empirical Relationships
230(1)
Permeability Tests
231(3)
Laboratory Permeability Tests
234(3)
Field Permeability Tests
237(1)
Capillarity
237(13)
Water in Capillary Tubes
239(4)
Capillary Rise in Soil
243(2)
Time Rate of Capillary Rise
245(1)
Suspended Capillaries
245(1)
Elimination of Capillary Water in Soil
245(1)
Effects of Surface Tension
245(1)
Problems
246(4)
Movement of Water Through Soil: Practical Effects: Seepage, Drainage, Frost Heave, Contamination
250(62)
Flow Nets and Seepage
250(16)
Flow of Subsurface Water
250(1)
The Need for Flow Nets and Flow Net Theory
251(5)
Boundaries for the Flow Net
256(3)
Flow Nets for Nonisotropic Soils
259(2)
Uplift Forces
261(1)
Other Seepage Forces
261(3)
Practical Considerations
264(2)
Quicksand
266(1)
Drainage
266(24)
Conditions Requiring Drainage
266(1)
Dewatering Shallow Excavations
266(1)
Dewatering Intermediate Depths
267(4)
Deep Drainage
271(1)
Consolidation Drainage
271(1)
Summary: Techniques for Subsurface Drainage
272(1)
Drainage after Construction
272(1)
Foundation Drains
273(1)
Blanket Drains
274(1)
Interceptor Drains
274(1)
Flow Through a Structure
275(1)
Filter Design (Aggregate Filters)
276(2)
Drainage, Filtration, Separation, and Protection with Geosynthetics (Synthetic Fabrics)
278(7)
Land Drainage
285(4)
Effects of Drainage
289(1)
Soil Percolation Rate
289(1)
Frost Heave in Soils
290(7)
Permafrost
295(2)
Soil and Groundwater Contamination
297(15)
Soil Gas
303(4)
Use of Geosynthetics to Prevent Ground Contamination
307(3)
Problems
310(2)
Combined Stresses in Soil Masses: Stress at a Point and Mohr's Circle
312(14)
Stress at a Point: Analytical Development
312(4)
Mohr's Circle
316(10)
Problems
323(3)
Subsurface Stresses
326(21)
Stresses Caused by the Soil Mass
326(5)
Vertical Stresses
326(1)
Effect of Groundwater Table
327(1)
Horizontal (Lateral) Stresses
328(3)
Stress within the Soil Mass Resulting from Vertical Surface Loading
331(16)
Uniform Homogeneous Soils
331(1)
Boussinesq Stress Distribution
331(1)
Westergaard Stress Distribution
332(1)
Computational Aids
333(1)
Application for Foundation Loading
334(3)
Sixty-Degree Approximation
337(2)
Layered Soils Having Different Properties
339(1)
Effect of Foundation Installation Below Finished Grade
340(1)
Effect of Changing the Surface Grade
341(2)
Problems
343(4)
Settlement: Soil Compression, Volume Distortion, Consolidation
347(49)
Basic Considerations
347(4)
Settlement of Foundations on Sand
351(9)
Schmertmann Method
351(5)
Dilatometer Method
356(1)
Approximations for Estimating Settlement of Foundations on Sand
357(3)
Settlement of Foundations on Clay Soils
360(18)
Volume Distortion Settlement for Clays
360(3)
Primary Compression Settlement for Clays
363(14)
Secondary Compression of Clay Soil
377(1)
Settlement Resulting from Earth Fill
378(1)
Consolidation
379(6)
Surcharging
385(11)
Acceleration of the Soil Improvement Process
386(1)
Horizontal Drainage
387(4)
Problems
391(5)
Shear Strength Theory
396(45)
Laboratory Tests
397(8)
Direct Shear Test
397(2)
Triaxial Compression Test
399(4)
Plane Strain and Asymmetrical Strain
403(1)
Unconfined Compression Test
403(1)
Vane Shear Test
403(2)
Shear Test Results Plotted on Mohr's Circle Coordinates
405(3)
Strength or Failure Envelope
406(2)
Shearing Strength
408(23)
Shearing Strength of Cohesionless Soil
408(6)
Approximating Values of ϕ from Site Investigation Data (SPT, CPT, DMT)
414(2)
Shearing Strength of Clay Soils
416(6)
Shear Strength of Clay Related to Triaxial Testing
422(6)
Approximating Shear Strength of Cohesive Soil from Site Investigation Data (SPT, CPT, DMT, VST)
428(1)
Shear Strength of Mixed Soils
429(1)
Position of Failure Plane Related to Angle ϕ
430(1)
Stress Paths
431(10)
Stress Path for Tests in Consolidated-Drained Conditions
432(2)
Stress Path for Tests in Consolidated-Undrained Conditions
434(1)
Applications
435(2)
Problems
437(4)
PART III APPLICATION OF SOIL MECHANICS THEORIES 441(308)
Foundations: Introductory Concepts
443(26)
General Types of Foundations--Foundation Categories
444(3)
Spread Footings
444(1)
Mat (or Raft) Foundations
445(1)
Pile and Pier Foundations
445(1)
Caissons
446(1)
Floating Foundations
447(1)
Pile Foundation Types and Installation Procedures
447(16)
Pile Drivers for Driven Piles
447(6)
Pile Types and Materials
453(5)
Representative Pile Load Capacities and Available Lengths
458(3)
Methods to Aid Pile Installation
461(2)
Other Installation Considerations
463(1)
Relating Soil Conditions and Foundation Types
463(6)
Problems
466(3)
Foundations: Design Considerations and Methods
469(92)
Shallow Foundations--Design and Installation Criteria
470(1)
Basic Concepts--Long (Strip) Footings
470(2)
Bearing Capacity Equations
472(19)
Additional Considerations, Bearing Capacity Equation
478(3)
Application for Design--The Extended Bearing Capacity Equation
481(7)
Footings on Slopes
488(3)
Footing Design Data from Penetration Resistance in Boreholes
491(12)
Standard Penetration Test and Sand
491(5)
The Standard Penetration Test and Cohesive Soil
496(1)
Static Cone Penetrometer and Sand
496(1)
Static Cone Penetrometer and Cohesive Soil
497(2)
The Pressuremeter and Foundation Design
499(4)
Effects of Seismic Events
503(11)
Seismic Bearing Capacity of Spread Footing Foundations
503(5)
Seismic-Induced Liquefaction
508(6)
Presumptive Bearing Pressures
514(1)
Foundation Walls
515(3)
Deep Foundations--Capacity and Installation Criteria
518(1)
Pile and Pier Foundations
518(34)
Statical Analysis
519(1)
Statical Method--Driven Piles in Sand
520(6)
Statical Method--Driven Piles in Clay
526(5)
Factor of Safety
531(1)
Negative Skin Friction
532(1)
Other Design Considerations
532(1)
Statical Method--Bored Piers and Piles (Drilled Shaft Foundations)
533(6)
Arrangement for Piles in a Group
539(1)
Group Capacity
540(2)
Pile Group Settlement
542(1)
Pile Load Tests
543(2)
Pile-Driving Formulas
545(7)
Supervision of Foundation Construction
552(9)
Problems
553(8)
Site Improvement: Earth Moving, Compaction, and Stabilization
561(52)
Field Procedures--General Considerations, Methods, and Techniques
562(8)
Alternative Methods of Transporting Earth Fill
569(1)
Field Equipment--Surface Zone Compaction
570(9)
Surface Compaction Equipment
571(8)
Deep-Ground Improvement Techniques
579(12)
Vibrocompaction
579(4)
Vibroreplacement
583(1)
Dynamic Deep Compaction/Consolidation
584(2)
Dynamic Replacement™
586(1)
Controlled Modulus Column (CMC)™
586(2)
Stone Columns
588(1)
Compacting by Explosives
588(2)
Vacuum Consolidation
590(1)
Soil Stabilization
591(6)
Use of Natural and Chemical Additives
591(3)
Use of Geosynthetics for Stabilization and Reinforcement
594(3)
Methods for Establishing Required Soil Density
597(6)
Field Control and Field Density Tests
603(10)
Sand-Cone Method
605(1)
Balloon Method
606(1)
Nuclear Moisture--Density Method
606(3)
Problems
609(4)
Stability of Unsupported Slopes
613(60)
Types of Slope Movements
613(4)
Isotropic Soils and Uniform Slopes of Infinite Extent
617(5)
Cohesionless Soil
617(3)
Soils Possessing Cohesion
620(2)
Slopes of Finite Extent--Soils Possessing Cohesion
622(22)
Types of Rotational Slides in Isotropic Soils
622(1)
Stability Analysis--General Concepts
622(3)
Strength Properties for Analysis--Clay and Mixed Soils
625(2)
Basic Methods for Stability Analysis
627(2)
Methods of Slices
629(9)
Noncircular Slip Surfaces
638(4)
Effect of Tension Cracks
642(1)
Sliding Block Analysis
642(2)
Computational Aids--Slope Stability Charts
644(22)
Taylor Charts
644(5)
Bishop-Morganstern, Barnes Charts
649(7)
Barnes Charts/Tables for Excavated Slopes
656(5)
Spencer Charts
661(2)
Morganstern Charts for Rapid Drawdown
663(3)
Variation in Shear Stress and Factor of Safety
666(1)
Improving Stability of Slopes
667(6)
Problems
669(4)
Lateral Pressures and Retaining Structures
673(76)
Lateral Earth Pressure and Retaining Walls
675(8)
At-Rest Pressure
675(2)
Effect of Submergence
677(2)
Active and Passive Lateral Pressures--Basic Considerations
679(4)
Earth Pressures Against Retaining Walls
683(4)
Classical Theories
683(4)
Lateral Pressures Related to Wall Movement
687(9)
Practical Considerations
687(1)
Cohesionless Soil Backfill
688(2)
Goh Analysis
690(1)
Cohesive Soil Backfill
690(3)
Recommended Design Criteria for Gravity Walls
693(1)
Effects of Groundwater and Freezing
693(3)
Retaining Wall Design Requirements
696(16)
Common Types of Walls, Construction Considerations
696(2)
Basic Design Considerations
698(8)
Surface Loads near Wall
706(1)
Terzaghi-Peck Charts for Backfill Pressures
707(1)
Earthquake Forces and Gravity Retaining Walls
707(5)
Alternate Types of Retaining Structures
712(3)
Gabion Retaining Walls
712(1)
Reinforced Earth
713(2)
Excavation Bracing
715(10)
Types and Installation of Excavation Bracing
715(7)
Lateral Pressures for Designing Bracing
722(3)
Anchored Bulkheads
725(3)
Water-Retaining Structures: Dams
728(21)
Earth Fill Dams
730(5)
Rockfill Dams
735(2)
Concrete and Masonry Dams
737(7)
Problems
744(5)
Appendix A Application of LaPlace Equation to Flow Nets 749(3)
Appendix B Laboratory Procedure to Determine Coefficient of Consolidation 752(4)
Appendix C Mathematical Development of the Bishop Equation for Slope Stability 756(3)
Bibliography 759(16)
Answers to Selected Problems 775(6)
Index 781

Excerpts

The broad range of topics included within the scope of Geotechnics (the field of soil mechanics and foundations) surprises many. The comprehensive nature of this text serves to introduce those topics to students in engineering, architectural, and construction-related academic programs. This sixth edition provides present-day, state-of-the-art information as accepted by, and conventionally used by, the engineering profession; theories basic to understanding soil behavior are covered and then associated with practical applications. The text remains an introductory level learning instrument for a first course in geotechnics in a planned academic program and does not progress into topics considered to be on the advanced level or of professional specialty; however, the extent of presentations and the emphasis on application should also make this edition a worthy reference for practitioners. An introductory level text for a technical course provides an overview of the subject and develops basic concepts but also includes details sufficient to permit solutions for many types of practical problems. A classroom instructor for a geotechnics course can indicate that the material in this text is the analogue to a Strength of Materials and Basic Structural Design sequence used in college programs to study behavior and performance of engineering materials, but for the understanding of soil materials relating to construction and design involving earthworks and foundations, for land use-site planning, and environmental protection purposes. Core topics have been carried forward from the previous edition but with appropriate updating. Important changes for this sixth edition include new material on residual soil formations and soil classifications, recent information relating effects of seismic activity on soil conditions, including updated Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) provisions for structures (requirements being incorporated into the revisions of regional building codes), increased material on the concepts and procedures for site improvement, and increased information forin situtesting and measurements in soil formations. The SI system remains the precedent system for units in the text, but with data and illustrations also presented in U.S. customary units. The illustrated problems within chapters, which show applications of theory, are realistic although often simplified. The end-of-chapter problems that help to evaluate comprehension (for the benefit of classroom instruction and student practice) include some changes and additions to the material in the previous edition. This text is a comprehensive presentation of topics in the field of soil mechanics and foundations, and includes more material than can be covered within the time allocated to the typical three- or four-credit college course. Accordingly, it is expected that chapter topics selected for use by classroom instructors at different campuses will vary, guided by the requirement or intent of the institution program. But typically, after students have learned basic material, other text topics (particularly those relating to applications) can be self-taught to obtain working knowledge as may be required for subsequent courses. The library staff at the author's home institution, Mohawk Valley Community College, SUNY, proved exceptionally helpful in obtaining many of the new references. The past efforts of many individuals are incorporated into the pages of this edition, and the dedication of those advancing the level of our knowledge deserves recognition. Illustrations and photographs provided by others, both those new for this edition and those continuing from previous editions, are acknowledged where presented but the involved individuals are due a repeated thank you: This edition includes many new and replacement photographs and diagrams--a number of these are from t


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...