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Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy,9780137692330

Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy

by ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780137692330

ISBN10:
0137692331
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL
List Price: $48.00
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Summary

This book offers a wealth of up-to-date coverage geared to the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy standards. With its practical focus and planned, concise coverage, the book ensures readers gain both a theoretical background and an applications orientation. An entire chapter is devoted to exploring contemporary ethical issues for which no formal precedent has yet been established. In addition, there are numerous case studies, and discussions of the differences between MFT as a distinct profession and MFT as a professional subspecialty. In each of the three major sections, chapters address "general" issues, as well as issues specific to marriage and family therapy. A concluding chapter in each section offers case illustrations that expand upon the material covered in the previous chapter. This two-step presentation helps learners attain a greater understanding of how information is used in actual practice...and helps them more effectively internalize instruction. For marriage and family counselors.

Author Biography

Charles H. Huber is on the faculty in the Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, New Mexico State University.

Table of Contents

PART ONE ETHICAL ISSUES IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY 1(118)
Promoting Ethical Practice
3(37)
Virtue Ethics and Principle Ethics
4(1)
Professional Codes of Ethics
5(4)
Ethical Decision Making
9(4)
Client Welfare
13(4)
Multiple-Client Considerations
17(2)
Confidentiality
19(10)
Privileged Communication
20(3)
Privacy
23(1)
The Duty to Protect
24(1)
Confidentiality in Marriage and Family Therapy
25(4)
Informed Consent
29(8)
Therapeutic Contracts
31(3)
Professional Disclosure Statements
34(3)
Informed Consent Concerns in Marriage and Family Therapy
37(2)
Summary and Conclusions
39(1)
Ethical Considerations in the Interactional Context of Marriage and Family Therapy
40(23)
Defining the Problem
41(3)
Complications in Convening Therapy
44(5)
The Therapist as Agent for Change
49(5)
Paradoxical Procedures
54(3)
Agency Triangulation
57(5)
Summary and Conclusions
62(1)
Contemporary Ethical Concerns
63(27)
AIDS and the Duty to Protect
64(3)
Dual Relationships
67(4)
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and Its Use in Marriage and Family Therapy
71(4)
The Treatment Context for Domestic Violence
75(4)
Managed Mental Health Care
79(5)
Technology
84(1)
Diversity
85(1)
Publications
86(1)
Summary and Conclusions
87(3)
Ethical Accountability: A Casebook
90(29)
Responsibility to Clients
96(4)
Confidentiality
100(4)
Professional Competence and Integrity
104(4)
Responsibility to Students, Employees, and Supervisees
108(2)
Responsibility to Research Participants
110(3)
Responsibility to the Profession
113(3)
Financial Arrangements
116(2)
Advertising
118(1)
PART TWO LEGAL ISSUES IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY 119(110)
The Marriage and Family Therapist: Roles and Responsibilities Within the Legal System
121(44)
Legal Education
122(7)
Common Law
123(1)
Constitutional Law
123(1)
Statutory Law
123(1)
Administrative (Regulatory) Law
123(1)
Case Law (Court Decisions)
123(3)
Criminal v. Civil Law
126(3)
The Marriage and Family Therapist as a Source of Information
129(8)
The Duty to Protect
129(4)
Child Abuse and Neglect
133(4)
The Marriage and Family Therapist as Referral Resource
137(9)
The Treatment Specialist
137(1)
Diagnostician
138(3)
Resource Expert
141(1)
Treatment Provider
142(1)
Mediation
143(3)
The Marriage and Family Therapist as Expert Witness
146(8)
The Rules of Evidence
147(1)
Courtroom Testimony
148(4)
Systemic Understandings and Expert Testimony
152(1)
Redefining the Problem
152(1)
Dealing with Resistance
153(1)
Professional Liability Under the Law
154(8)
Contract Law
155(1)
Unintentional Torts: Malpractice
156(3)
Intentional Torts
159(2)
Professional Liability Insurance
161(1)
Summary and Conclusions
162(1)
Recommended Resources
163(2)
Family Law
165(30)
Marriage and Cohabitation
166(6)
Parent-Child Relationships
172(7)
Legitimacy and Paternity
172(2)
Adoption
174(2)
Surrogate Parenthood
176(1)
Abortion
177(2)
Parental Rights and Responsibilities
179(2)
Annulment and Divorce
181(6)
Annulment
181(1)
Divorce
182(2)
Spousal Maintenance
184(1)
Division of Property
185(2)
Child Custody and Support After Divorce
187(6)
Child Custody
188(3)
Child Support
191(2)
Legal Actions Between Parents and Children
193(1)
Summary and Conclusions
194(1)
Recommended Resources
194(1)
Legal Considerations
195(34)
Ethics and the Law
197(3)
Divorce Mediation
200(3)
Liability in Crisis Counseling
203(2)
Informed Consent?
205(3)
Criminal Liability
208(4)
Parental Rights and the Buckley Amendment
212(3)
The Premarital Agreement
215(3)
Privileged Communications
218(4)
Legal Responsibility of Clinical Supervisors
222(3)
Insurance Fraud?
225(4)
PART THREE PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY 229(86)
Valuing and the Professional Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy
231(20)
Values Clarification
233(1)
Systemic Epistemology
234(6)
Negotiation: The Nature of Valuing
240(2)
The Practice Implications of Valuing
242(3)
Valuing Components
245(5)
Summary and Conclusions
250(1)
Professional Identity as a Marriage and Family Therapist
251(38)
Profession or Professional Specialization
252(3)
Marriage and Family Therapy as a Separate and Distinct Profession
252(2)
Marriage and Family Therapy as a Professional Specialization
254(1)
Professional Affiliation
255(17)
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT)
255(14)
American Family Therapy Association (AFTA)
269(1)
Family Psychology (Division 43 of APA)
270(1)
International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors
271(1)
State Licensure and Marriage and Family Therapy
272(2)
Licensure Requirements for Marriage and Family Therapists
274(4)
Licensure Coverage
275(2)
Qualifications
277(1)
The Licensure Process
277(1)
Research: A Means of Promoting Professional Identity
278(2)
Pragmatic Issues and Professional Identity
280(7)
Professional Advertising
281(2)
Continuing Education
283(3)
Intraprofessional Communications
286(1)
Summary and Conclusions
287(2)
Professional Issues
289(26)
Evolving Epistemology in Actual Practice
290(3)
Marriage and Family Interventions With Other Systems
293(2)
Values Transactions
295(3)
Addressing Ambivalence
298(5)
Professional Advertising
303(2)
Practice Interruptions
305(1)
Business-Oriented Details
306(3)
Independent Practice in a Rural Area
309(2)
Being a ``Public'' Marriage and Family Therapist
311(2)
Optimally Serving Oneself and One's Clients
313(2)
References 315(24)
Name Index 339(6)
Subject Index 345

Excerpts

Preface Although less than 100 years old, professional psychotherapy has become a major influence in society. Therapists contribute to and considerably affect many aspects of modern life. During this time, psychotherapy has broadened its perspective. No longer is it practiced exclusively on a one-therapist-to-one-client basis. Group therapy efforts have become commonplace in almost every mental health setting. Likewise, the last several decades have seen the advent of another expansion within the psychotherapeutic field, that of marriage and family therapy. Many therapists have replaced or supplemented their traditional individual and group models of practice with one emphasizing couples and families as the dominant treatment focus. This is not to suggest that contact with marital partners and other family members had been completely ignored. Rather, marital partners and family members had always been considered in light of the individual client's concerns and from an individually oriented therapeutic perspective. As the practice of marriage and family therapy has evolved, training procedures have become more explicit, replicable, and accessible. Specific theories and techniques have been identified. Broad curricular components for training have been compiled. And specific content, goals, and teaching methods for university coursework and professional workshops have been delineated. These materials and strategies all continue to be researched, evaluated, and enhanced. Noticeably lacking before the publication of the first edition ofEthical, Legal, and Professional Issues in the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy,however, were sources addressing "nontherapy" issues necessary to supplement the therapeutic training of marriage and family therapists (Piercy & Sprenkle, 1983). The importance of these nontherapy issues was emphasized in an article entitled "Family Therapy May Be Dangerous for Your Health" (Hare-Mustin, 1980), in which the author states: In sum, family therapy may not be in the best interests of individual family members. Family therapists and their clients need to be aware of possible risks to the rights of the individual member. By being required to participate, individuals may have to subordinate their own goals and give up limited confidentiality and privacy. In addition, therapists who idealize the traditional family may foster stereotyped roles and expectations in the family that disadvantage individuals and limit their well-being and mental health. (p. 938) Although offerings in the professional literature and training opportunities at conferences and workshops have increased in both number and quality, nontherapy issues--particularly ethical, legal, and associated professional concerns--are still underrepresented in relation to their potential impact on the practice of many mental health professionals. The simple fact that marriage and family therapy differs from individual and group therapy on both conceptual and pragmatic levels requires that therapists be adequately prepared to handle controversial issues from a marriage and family perspective as well. Questions that are difficult in individual and group therapy can become significantly more complicated when a couple or whole family presents itself for services (Margolin, 1982). The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, the professional organization with which most marriage and family therapists are primarily affiliated, specifies graduate-level coursework in "professional studies" as a requirement within its educational requirements for clinical membership. In response, courses in "ethical, legal, and professional issues" have been developed and constitute a core component of marriage and family training programs. The first and second editions ofEthical, Legal, and Professional Issues in the Pr


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