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Ethics in Media Communications Cases and Controversies (with InfoTrac),9780534637149
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Ethics in Media Communications Cases and Controversies (with InfoTrac)

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780534637149

ISBN10:
0534637140
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing

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Summary

Part One: FOUNDATION AND PRINCIPLES. 1. Ethics and Moral Development. 2. Ethics and Society. 3. Ethics and Moral Reasoning. Part Two: CASES IN MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS. 4. Truth and Honesty in Media Communications. 5. The Media and Privacy: A Delicate Balance. 6. Confidentiality and the Public Interest. 7. Conflicts of Interest. 8. Economic Pressures and Social Responsibility. 9. The Media and Antisocial Behavior. 10. Morally Offensive Content: Freedom and Responsibility. 11. Media Content and Juveniles: Special Ethical Concerns. 12. Media Practitioners and Social Justice. 13. Stereotypes in Media Communications. Appendixes.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Introduction xvii
PART ONE: FOUNDATIONS AND PRINCIPLES
1(76)
Ethics and Moral Development
2(21)
The Study of Ethics: An Overview
2(5)
The Three Branches of Ethics
4(1)
Ethical Communication
5(2)
The Value of Ethics Education
7(3)
Contents of a Course in Media Ethics
8(1)
Developing Ethical Fitness
9(1)
The First Principles of Moral Virtue
10(3)
Credibility
10(1)
Integrity
11(1)
Civility
12(1)
The Formation of Ethical Values and Attitudes
13(5)
Defining Values and Attitudes
13(2)
Sources of Values and Attitudes
15(2)
Personal Values and Professional Ethics
17(1)
The Ethical Dilemma: Conflict of Values
18(5)
Summary
20(1)
Notes
21(2)
Ethics and Society
23(31)
The Need for a System of Ethics
23(5)
Society and Moral Anchors
23(3)
The Functions of the Media within the Ethical System
26(2)
Requirements of a System of Ethics
28(2)
Shared Values
28(1)
Wisdom
29(1)
Justice
29(1)
Freedom
29(1)
Accountability
30(1)
The Social Compact and Moral Duties
30(3)
The Two Levels of Moral Duty
30(1)
Deciding among Moral Duties
31(2)
The Nexus of Law and Ethics
33(2)
Institutional Autonomy and Social Responsibility
35(7)
The Libertarian View
36(1)
Social Responsibility
37(5)
The Challenges of the Information Age
42(3)
Convergence: New Media and Old Media
42(1)
The Ethics of Cyberspace: Old Wine in New Bottles
43(2)
The Media as Socially Responsible Institutions
45(9)
Codes of Conduct
46(1)
The Ombudsman System
47(2)
News Councils
49(1)
Summary
50(1)
Notes
51(3)
Ethics and Moral Reasoning
54(23)
Moral Reasoning and Ethical Decision Making
54(1)
The Context of Moral Reasoning
55(1)
The Philosophical Foundations of Moral Theory
56(1)
The Greek Connection
56(1)
Ethical Perspectives and Traditions
57(4)
Care-Based Ethics
57(1)
Kant and Moral Duty
57(1)
The Appeal of Utilitarianism
58(1)
Ethics as a Social Contract
59(1)
Feminist Ethics
60(1)
The Rise of Relativism
60(1)
Ethical Theories in Moral Reasoning
61(4)
Deontological (Duty-Based) Theories
61(1)
Teleological (Consequence-Based) Theories
62(2)
Virtue Theories: Aristotle's Golden Mean
64(1)
Critical Thinking in Moral Reasoning
65(1)
A Model of Moral Reasoning
66(3)
The Situation Definition
66(1)
Analysis of the Situation
67(1)
Decision
68(1)
A Sample Case Study
69(8)
Situation Definition
69(1)
Analysis
70(3)
Decision
73(1)
Summary
73(1)
Notes
74(3)
PART TWO: CASES IN MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS
77(372)
Truth and Honesty in Media Communications
78(54)
A World of Limited Truth
78(2)
Truth as a Fundamental Value
80(2)
The Importance of Truth
82(2)
Media Practitioners and the Truth--Falsehood Dichotomy
84(17)
Truth in Journalism
84(12)
Where Truth and Fiction Collide: The Docudrama
96(2)
Truth in Advertising and Public Relations
98(2)
Public Relations and Journalism: A Love--Hate Relationship
100(1)
Intellectual Dishonesty
101(2)
Truth Telling and Approaches to Moral Reasoning
103(1)
Truth and Deception: Hypothetical Case Studies
104(1)
Case Studies
105(1)
Undercover Advertising in the Public Square
105(2)
Crisis Management on the Web and the Framing of Truth
107(4)
Hidden Cameras and the Journalist as Social Conscience
111(4)
Political Communication on the Net: Is Voter Targeting Responsible Behavior?
115(2)
The Careless Chaperons and the Unbridled Teens
117(2)
Digital Photography and the Manipulation of Reality
119(3)
Tainted Research and the Right to Know
122(3)
Vow of Silence
125(7)
Notes
128(4)
The Media and Privacy: A Delicate Balance
132(46)
Ethics and Privacy: The Search for Meaning
132(1)
The Value of Privacy
133(4)
The Emergence of Privacy as a Moral Value
134(2)
Privacy as a Legal Concept
136(1)
The Need for an Ethics of Privacy
137(3)
Basic Principles
137(2)
Data Mining and Privacy in Cyberspace
139(1)
Privacy and the Journalist: Some Special Problem Areas
140(13)
Contagious Diseases and Disabilities
141(1)
Homosexuality
142(1)
Sex Crimes
143(2)
Juvenile Offenders
145(1)
Using Children as Sources
146(1)
Suicides
147(2)
Secret Cameras and Recorders
149(1)
Accidents and Personal Tragedies
150(1)
Computers and Database Journalism
151(2)
The Search for Journalistic Guidelines
153(1)
Advertising and Privacy
154(1)
Privacy: Hypothetical Case Studies
155(1)
Case Studies
155(1)
News Values versus Privacy: The Case of ``Designer Baby'' Anna Marie
155(3)
The Supreme Court Candidate's Untimely Withdrawal
158(3)
The Pregnant Place Kicker
161(3)
The Massacre at Langdale High and Laura's Secret Diary
164(3)
Electronic Billboards on the Freeway and Motorist Privacy
167(3)
The Right to Die with Dignity
170(2)
Cyberspace Data Mining as a Public Relations Tool
172(6)
Notes
175(3)
Confidentiality and the Public Interest
178(33)
The Principle of Confidentiality
178(3)
The Justification for Confidentiality
181(1)
Seeking Disclosure: the Moral Position of the Actor
182(2)
Confidentiality in Journalism: Some Special Concerns
184(3)
The Case for and against Confidentiality
184(3)
A Delicate Balance: Confidentiality and Competing Interests
187(1)
Changes in the Reporter--Source Relationship
187(1)
The Principle of Confidentiality: Hypothetical Cases
188(1)
Case Studies
189(1)
Guarding a Secret about a Military Hero
189(4)
A Public Relations Challenge: Fraud in a University's Basketball Program
193(3)
Allegations of Sexual Harassment: Newsworthy or Political Dirty Tricks
196(2)
Gender Norming and the Admiral's Public Relations Problem
198(4)
Attorney--Client Privilege and the Public's Right to Know
202(3)
Client Confidentiality in Radio Sales
205(1)
The Student Newspaper and Faculty Evaluations
206(5)
Notes
209(2)
Conflicts of Interest
211(36)
Conflicts of Interest: Real and Imagined
211(2)
Recognizing Conflicts: The Most Troublesome Terrain
213(12)
Conflicting Relationships
213(6)
Conflicting Public Participation
219(4)
Vested Interests and Hidden Agendas
223(2)
Approaches to Dealing with Conflicts of Interest
225(1)
Conflicts of Interest: Hypothetical Case Studies
225(1)
Case Studies
226(1)
The PR Practitioner as Political Activist
226(2)
DNA Testing: A Journalist's Call for Justice
228(3)
The NABJ and Divided Loyalties
231(2)
A Witness to Genocide
233(3)
A Television Station's Conflicting Messages
236(2)
Campus Journalists and the Tobacco Wars
238(3)
Switching Sides in Public Relations
241(6)
Notes
244(3)
Economic Pressures and Social Responsibility
247(35)
Economic Interests versus Moral Obligations
247(1)
Concentration of Media Ownership
248(3)
The Alliance of Mass Media and Marketing
251(4)
The Role of Advertising
255(4)
The Media's Lifeline: The Ethical Challenges of Commercial Sponsorship
255(3)
The Challenges of Cyberspace
258(1)
Product Placements
259(1)
Economic Pressures: Hypothetical Case Studies
260(1)
Case Studies
260(1)
Sports Reporting: Who Controls the Content?
260(3)
Web-Based Ads and the Search Engine's Search for Financial Stability
263(3)
Impotency Drugs and the Promotion of Sexual Pleasure
266(3)
The Alumni Magazine: Journalism or Public Relations?
269(3)
Product Placement in Prime Time
272(2)
Slain Civil Rights Heroes as Commercial Props
274(2)
The Junket as a Public Relations Tool
276(6)
Notes
278(4)
The Media and Antisocial Behavior
282(37)
The Influence of the Media on Behavior
282(1)
Media Lessons and Moral Responsibility
283(10)
Antisocial Acts and Professional Obligations
283(1)
The Media's Influence on Antisocial Behavior
284(9)
The Media and Civility
293(4)
Uncivil Behavior
293(1)
Hate Speech
294(2)
Dirty Tricks
296(1)
The Media and Antisocial Behavior: Hypothetical Case Studies
297(1)
Case Studies
297(1)
Animals as Mediated Entertainment: Property or Moral Beings?
297(3)
Online Ads for AIDS Drugs and the Promotion of Unsafe Sex
300(3)
Investigating Child Pornography: Limits of the First Amendment
303(2)
Hiring the Criminal Element for Nation Building: Laytel's PR Problem
305(3)
Sports Trash Talk and the End of Innocence
308(2)
Alcohol Ads in the Campus Newspaper
310(3)
Online Links to Terrorist Home Pages
313(6)
Notes
316(3)
Morally Offensive Content: Freedom and Responsibility
319(34)
Society's Surveillance of Offensive Material
319(1)
Pornography, Indecency, and Moral Responsibility
320(5)
Offensive Speech
325(1)
A Matter of Taste: Shocking and Disturbing Visuals
326(3)
The Lingering Legacy of Blasphemy
329(1)
The Case for Moral Limits
330(1)
The Harm Principle
330(1)
The Paternalism Principle
330(1)
The Moralism Principle
331(1)
The Offense Principle
331(1)
The Case against Moral Limits
331(1)
The Search for Standards
332(1)
Morally Offensive Content: Hypothetical Case Studies
333(1)
Case Studies
333(1)
The College Newspaper Columnist as Resident ``Sexpert''
333(3)
A Condom Crusade Takes on the Vatican
336(2)
Live! From Death Row!
338(3)
The Resurrection Conspiracy: Blasphemy or Artistic Freedom?
341(3)
Cyberporn and Free Speech
344(2)
The Reparations Ad and the Limits of Free Speech
346(3)
The Controversial Wedding Photo
349(4)
Notes
351(2)
Media Content and Juveniles: Special Ethical Concerns
353(28)
Juveniles and Cultural Paternalism
353(2)
Influences on the Juvenile Audience
355(6)
Movies
355(2)
Television
357(1)
Advertising
358(3)
The Juvenile Audience: Hypothetical Case Studies
361(1)
Case Studies
362(1)
Madison Avenue's Youngest Consumers
362(2)
The Suspended Football Players
364(3)
Nottoway Landing's Cult Following among Young Female Viewers
367(3)
Teen Therapy on the Airwaves
370(3)
Advertising in the Public Schools
373(2)
Video Games and the Promotion of Incivility
375(6)
Notes
378(3)
Media Practitioners and Social Justice
381(36)
Social Justice as a Dominant Moral Value
381(1)
The Principle of Formal Justice
382(1)
Media Practitioners and Social Justice: Two Views
382(13)
The Libertarian Concept of Justice
383(1)
The Egalitarian Concept and Social Responsibility
384(1)
The Mainstream: A Philosophical Blend
385(10)
Social Justice and Ethical Decision Making
395(1)
The Media and Social Justice: Hypothetical Cases
396(1)
Case Studies
396(1)
The Jewish Reporter: Religion and the Workplace
396(3)
Jury Deliberations as Reality TV
399(3)
Diversity in the Public Relations Workplace: Race and Social Justice
402(4)
The African American Publisher and Divided Loyalties
406(2)
International Public Relations, Morality, and Social Justice
408(3)
Environmental Justice and Media Access
411(6)
Notes
414(3)
Stereotypes in Media Communications
417(32)
Stereotypes and Value Formation
417(3)
The Role of Stereotypes in Media Content
420(9)
Racial and Ethnic Minorities
421(3)
Female Stereotypes
424(1)
Sexual Orientation and Stereotypical Depictions
425(2)
Older People
427(1)
People with Disabilities
428(1)
People with Mental Illness
428(1)
Strategies for Confronting Media Stereotyping
429(1)
Stereotypes and the Media: Hypothetical Case Studies
430(1)
Case Studies
430(1)
Dirty Laundry and the Editorial Cartoon
430(3)
Framing the Gay and Lesbian Issue for the Public Square
433(3)
Gender Wars and Sexual Stereotyping
436(2)
The Disabled Athlete in Television Fiction
438(4)
The American Indians' Battle with the Major Leagues
442(7)
Notes
446(3)
Epilogue
449(6)
A Couple of Lessons from This Text
449(1)
The State of Media Ethics: Mixed Signals
450(1)
The Newest Frontier: The Ethical Challenges of Cyberspace
451(1)
Toward Greater Ethical Awareness: What Can Be Done?
452(3)
Notes
453(2)
APPENDIX 1 Society of Professional Journalists: Code of Ethics
455(2)
APPENDIX 2 American Advertising Federation: Advertising Principles of American Business
457(1)
APPENDIX 3 Public Relations Society of America: Code of Ethics
458(5)
Selected Bibliography 463(4)
Index 467


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