9780805840629

The Ethics of Teaching: A Casebook

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780805840629

  • ISBN10:

    0805840621

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-07-01
  • Publisher: Psychology Pres

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Summary

The Ethics of Teachingprovides a frank discussion of the most frequently encountered ethical dilemmas that can arise in educational settings, as well as tips on how to avoid these predicaments and how to deal with them when they do occur. The goal is to stimulate discussion and raise faculties' consciousness about ethical issues. Ethical dilemmas are presented as short, engaging case scenarios, most of which are based on actual situations, so as to furnish more realistic and interesting stimuli for individual reflection and group discussion. These scenarios offer the opportunity to consider the subtle complexities inherent in the social and psychological contexts in which educator-student interactions occur and the effects of those complexities on ethical decision making. Each case is followed by a detailed analysis and advice. The book's 195 cases are grouped into 22 chapters representing topics, such as the controversial classroom presentations and assignments, debatable testing and grading practices, problematic student-faculty interactions, dual-role relationships with students, collegial conflicts, managing very difficult students, and confidentiality dilemmas. The Ethics of Teaching: A Casebook, Second Edition: *focuses on commonly encountered ethical "gray areas" that have no clear solution; *includes questions to stimulate discussion of related ethical issues; *concludes with a chapter on prevention, peer mentoring, and intervention; and *serves as excellent "assigned reading" to stimulate group discussion in teaching workshops and faculty development programs. The first edition of this book evolved by collecting a variety of teaching situations that commonly occur in college and university settings. The authors then created responses to the situations and circulated both the cases and the responses to reviewers from a number of departments across the country. As a result, the vast majority of the cases are "discipline free." The second edition features many new cases to reflect recent trends and events related to academic ethics. Questions were added to stimulate discussion and to further elaborate the issues. The Ethics of Teaching: A Casebookis ideal for college and university faculty, graduate assistants, and administrators involved in workshops, graduate teaching assistant courses, and faculty development and new faculty orientation programs. As a result of the book's cross-disciplinary development, it will be beneficial to faculty from a broad spectrum of disciplines.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Introduction xv
PART I: THE CLASSROOM AMBIANCE
Instructors' Classroom Policies
3(11)
Discipline in the Classroom
3(2)
Questions Unwelcome Here
5(1)
Reactions to Remarks Made by Students in Class
5(1)
Ready, Set, Go! Strict Class Start-Up Time
6(2)
Double-Standard Absence Policy
8(1)
Conflicts Between Academic Assignments and Other Campus Activities
9(1)
Conflicts Between Academic Assignments and Student Employment
10(1)
Excusing Students for Relationship-Related Matters
11(1)
Changing the Course in Midstream
12(2)
Student Deportment in the Classroom
14(15)
Love Birds in Class
14(1)
The Class Monopolist
15(2)
The Student Who Discloses Too Much
17(1)
Disruptive Students
18(1)
Just a Pinch
19(1)
Very Difficult Students: The Profane
20(2)
Very Difficult Students: The Scary
22(1)
Handling Students Who Are Cause for Concern
23(1)
The Large and Talkative Class: How Far Can We Go?
24(1)
Handling Prejudicial Statements Made by Students in Class
25(4)
PART II: THE CLASSROOM LEARNING EXPERIENCE
Instructors' Presentation Style and Content
29(21)
Irritable Instructors
29(1)
Frequent Use of Profanity in Class
30(2)
Oral Plagiarism
32(1)
Criticism of Colleagues in Class
33(1)
Little White Lies to Make a Point
34(1)
Twisting Facts
35(1)
Lecturing From the Textbook
36(1)
Risky Class Presentations
37(2)
Instructors' Personal Disclosures
39(1)
Disparities in What students Are Being Taught
40(1)
Teaching to Which Student Audience?
41(1)
Course Descriptions Versus Actual Course Content
42(1)
Why Are You Wasting My Time?
43(1)
When Instructors Cut Classes
44(1)
No-Show Instructors
45(1)
Dress Code for Instructors?
46(1)
Requiring the Use of Technology
47(1)
Reluctance to Change With the Times
48(2)
Required In-Class Learning Activities
50(11)
Role Playing in Class
50(1)
Films as Surrogate Teachers
51(1)
Sensitive Visual Images
52(2)
Animal Demonstrations
54(1)
Unusual Classroom Demonstrations
55(1)
Requiring Students to Disclose in Class
56(5)
PART III: ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS
Testing and Other Academic Evaluations
61(16)
``Weed-Out'' Exams
61(1)
The Professional Note-Taker
62(1)
Unannounced Evaluations
63(2)
Play It Again, Sam: Reusing the Same Tests
65(1)
Same Assignments Every Term
66(1)
Harsh Make-Up Policies
67(2)
Variable Make-Up Policies
69(1)
Testing on Material Not Discussed in Class
70(1)
The Resistor
71(1)
Equivalent Tests for Nonequivalent Sections
72(1)
Unusual Class Assignments
73(2)
Requiring Personal Disclosures in Assignments
75(1)
Reading Assignments: Amount and Cost
76(1)
Grading Methods
77(16)
One-Shot Grading
77(1)
Term Project Format Versus Substance
78(1)
Strict Curve Versus Easy Grading
79(2)
Major/Nonmajor Grading Curves
81(1)
Grading Essay Exams
82(1)
Unfair Grading: Too Hard
83(1)
Unfair Grading: Too Little Data
84(1)
Grading Students Down for Attitudes
85(2)
Grading Students Down for Unethical Acts
87(1)
Use of the Incomplete Grade
88(1)
Grading Group Projects
89(2)
No Extra Credit
91(1)
Plenty of Extra Credit
92(1)
Feedback to Students
93(5)
Written Feedback to Students
93(1)
Oral Feedback to Students
94(1)
Minimal Feedback to Students
95(2)
Untimely Feedback to Students
97(1)
Writing Reference Letters for Students
98(11)
Biasing in the Service of Helpfulness
98(2)
The Bomb Letter
100(1)
Instructors' Hurt Feelings
101(1)
Recommendation Letters and Previous Information
102(2)
Recommendation Letters and Second-Hand Information
104(1)
Reference Letters: To Whom Is One Loyal?
105(1)
Sneaking a Peek at Reference Letters
106(1)
The Demand to See Reference Letters
107(2)
Biased Treatment of Students
109(11)
Differential Evaluation of Students
109(1)
Enhancing the Evaluation of Likeable Students
110(1)
Choosing Favorites
111(1)
Compensating for the Needs of Certain Students
112(1)
Giving Breaks to Special Student Groups
113(2)
Stifling Multicultural Perspectives
115(1)
Use of Word Definition Assistance During Exams
116(1)
Penalizing the Honest Student
117(1)
Instructors With Bad Attitudes About Students
118(2)
Academic Dishonesty
120(15)
Impermissible Collaboration
120(2)
Cheating or Not?
122(1)
Protection Against Cheating Students
123(2)
No Exit: Preventing Cheating
125(1)
Handling Suspected Plagiarism
126(1)
The Plagiarized Thesis
127(2)
Cheating on Homework Assignments
129(1)
Detecting Bogus Student Excuses
130(5)
PART IV: OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
Availability to Students
135(6)
Failing to Meet Office Hours
135(1)
Inconvenient Office Hours
136(1)
Refusing to Return Students' Messages
137(1)
Rights of Working Students
138(1)
Spending Fun Time With Students on Campus
139(2)
Student-Faculty Interactions
141(8)
Handling Prejudicial Statements Made by Students Outside Class
141(1)
Attending Students' Social Events
142(1)
Shared Interests After Hours
143(1)
Students at Professional Meetings
144(1)
Off-Campus Class Sessions
145(4)
PART V: RELATIONSHIPS IN ACADEMIA
Multiple Role Relations and Conflicts of Interest
149(13)
Look Who Showed Up in Class!
150(1)
Friends Enrolled in Class
151(1)
Lending Money to Students
151(1)
Gifts From Students
152(2)
Selling Goods to Students
154(1)
Bartering Services With Students
155(1)
Asking Favors of Students
156(1)
Businesses That Could Involve Students
157(1)
Instructor-Student Love Relationships
158(1)
Dating Graduate Students
159(2)
Hiring Students From Personal Funds for Nonacademic Jobs
161(1)
Interprofessional Relations
162(12)
Sour Grapevines
162(1)
Warring Colleagues
163(1)
Colleague Interference
164(1)
Stuck Between a Colleague and a Student
165(2)
Recommending Colleagues to Students
167(1)
The Anonymous Charge
168(1)
Knowledge of Poor Judgment Off-Campus
169(1)
It's Not in My Job Description
169(1)
When a Student Informs Us of a Colleague's Problem
170(1)
More Biased Assumptions
171(1)
Negative Comments About Another Specialty
172(2)
Exploitation of Students
174(9)
Taking Over a Student's Idea
174(1)
Inappropriate Handling of Disappointments
175(1)
Outside Tutoring for a Fee
176(1)
Using One's Own Work as Required Reading
177(1)
Royalties From ``Homemade'' Reading Collections
178(1)
Letting Go Is Hard to Do
178(1)
Selling Complimentary Books
179(1)
Biased Evidence of Teaching Effectiveness
180(2)
Textbook Adoption Choices
182(1)
Discrimination
183(7)
Out of Step
183(1)
Infatuated Students
184(2)
The ``Chilly Climate''
186(1)
Stereotyped Departmental Expectations
187(1)
Offending Colleagues' Sensibilities
188(2)
Manipulative Students and Instructors
190(9)
Helping an Irresponsible Student
190(1)
Skipping the Final Exam
191(2)
Too Many Chances?
193(1)
The Unexpected Quid Pro Quo
194(1)
Ingratiating Students
195(2)
Playing to Student Evaluations
197(2)
Supervising, Advising, and Collaboration With Students
199(16)
Student Assistant Responsibilities
199(1)
Student Assistant Access to Test Banks
200(1)
Heavy Use of Student Assistants
201(1)
Student Research Assistants
202(2)
Classroom Students as Data Collectors
204(1)
Authorship Order on Publications With Students
205(1)
Excessive Mentoring
206(2)
Misuse of Graduate Assistants
208(1)
Promoting Uncertain Futures
209(1)
Counseling Students on Nonacademic Matters
210(1)
Sponsoring Controversial Student Projects
211(4)
PART VI: RESPONSIBILITIES TO STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES
Instructor Competency
215(15)
Updating Lecture Notes
215(1)
Oversticking to One's Guns
216(2)
Physical Illness
218(1)
Unprepared to Teach
219(1)
Emotionally Distraught Instructors
220(1)
Drinking on Company Time
221(1)
Disorganized Lecture Presentations
222(1)
Burned Out
222(1)
Retreading to Teach New Subjects
223(2)
Course Section Variability
225(1)
Offering the Big Class, Regardless
226(1)
Gaps in Survey Course Coverage
227(1)
Remembering Students' Names
228(2)
Confidentiality Issues
230(11)
Lectures Based on Stories Students Tell Us
230(1)
Gossip After Hours
231(1)
Sharing Information Between Student Assistants and Instructors
232(2)
Knowledge of a Student's Illegal Act
234(1)
Instructors' Private Lives
235(1)
Dispersing Papers
236(1)
Publicizing Others' Private Information
237(1)
Unintended Effects of Cooperative Programs
238(1)
Unwanted Knowledge
239(2)
Political and Public Statements
241(12)
Politics in the Classroom
241(2)
Religion in the Classroom
243(2)
Hot Topics in the Classroom
245(1)
Campus Political Organizations
246(1)
Controversial Speakers
247(1)
Political Display in the Office
248(2)
Self-Presentation Off Campus
250(1)
The Bully Pulpit
251(2)
Responsibilities to the Institution
253(7)
Royalty Producing Work
253(2)
Using Institutional Resources Off Campus
255(1)
Double-Dipping
256(1)
Moonlighting
257(1)
Using Institutional Resources During Leisure Time
258(2)
Afterword: Prevention and Peer Intervention 260(6)
References 266(3)
Subject Index 269

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