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Exceptional Learners : Introduction to Special Education

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780205198863

ISBN10:
0205198864
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
7/1/1996
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon, Inc.

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 7/1/1996.
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Table of Contents

Preface xi
Exceptionality and Special Education
2(42)
Educational Definition of Exceptional Children and Youths
7(5)
Prevalence of Exceptional Children and Youths
12(2)
Definition of Special Education
14(6)
Providing Special Education
14(6)
Teachers' Roles
20(5)
Relationship between General and Special Education
21(1)
Expectations for All Educators
21(3)
Expectations for Special Educators
24(1)
Origins of Special Education
25(5)
People and Ideas
26(1)
Growth of the Discipline
27(1)
Professional and Parent Organizations
28(1)
Legislation
28(2)
Trends in Legislation and Litigation
30(10)
Trends in Legislation
30(1)
Relationship of Litigation to Legislation
30(1)
Trends in Litigation
31(3)
The Intent of Legislation: An Individualized Education Program
34(6)
A Perspective on the Progress of Special Education
40(2)
Summary
42(2)
Current Trends and Issues
44(40)
Integration
46(25)
Philosophical Roots: The Principle of Normalization
46(3)
Historical Roots: Deinstitutionalization and the Regular Education Initiative
49(1)
Full Inclusion
50(1)
Full Inclusion versus a Continuum of Placements
51(15)
Mainstreaming Practices
66(5)
Early Intervention
71(5)
Legislative History
72(1)
Types of Programs
73(1)
Issues
73(2)
Moving toward the Twenty-First Century
75(1)
Transition from Secondary School to Adulthood
76(5)
Federal Initiatives
77(1)
Issues
78(3)
Moving toward the Twenty-First Century
81(1)
Some Concluding Thoughts Regarding Trends and Issues
81(1)
Summary
82(2)
Multicultural and Bilingual Aspects of Special Education
84(34)
Education and Cultural Diversity: Concepts for Special Education
90(5)
Implementing Multicultural and Bilingual Special Education
95(21)
Assessment
98(4)
Instruction
102(8)
Socialization
110(6)
Summary
116(2)
Mental Retardation
118(42)
Definition
122(3)
Broadening the Definition
123(1)
Lowering the IQ Score Cutoff
123(1)
Retardation as Improvable and Possibly Nonpermanent
123(1)
Classification
124(1)
Criticisms of the AAMR Definition and Classification
125(1)
Prevalence
126(1)
Causes
127(7)
Persons with Mild Retardation, or Those Requiring Less Intensive Support
127(2)
Persons with More Severe Retardation, or Those Requiring More Intensive Support
129(5)
Assessment
134(2)
Intelligence Tests
134(2)
Adaptive Skills
136(1)
Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics
136(2)
Attention
136(1)
Memory
136(1)
Self-Regulation
136(1)
Language Development
137(1)
Academic Achievement
138(1)
Social Development
138(1)
Motivation
138(1)
Educational Considerations
138(8)
Students with Mild Retardation, or Those Requiring Less Intensive Support
139(1)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
140(2)
Students with More Severe Retardation, or Those Requiring More Intensive Support
142(2)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
144(1)
Using Applied Behavior Analysis to Teach Students with Mental Retardation
144(2)
Service Delivery Models
146(1)
Early Intervention
146(3)
Early Childhood Programs Designed for Prevention
147(1)
Early Childhood Programs Designed to Further Development
148(1)
Transition
149(9)
Community Adjustment
149(1)
Employment
149(4)
Importance of the Family
153(1)
Prospects for the Future
153(1)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Mental Retardation in General Education Classrooms
153(5)
Peggy L. Tarpley
Summary
158(2)
Learning Disabilities
160(48)
Definitions
162(6)
Factors to Consider in Definitions of Learning Disabilities
165(2)
The Federal Definition
167(1)
The National Joint Committee for Learning Disabilities (NJCLD) Definition
167(1)
Similarities and Differences in the Federal and NJCLD Definitions
168(1)
Prevalence
168(2)
Causes
170(2)
Organic and Biological Factors
170(1)
Genetic Factors
171(1)
Environmental Factors
172(1)
Assessment
172(4)
Standardized Achievement Tests
173(1)
Informal Reading Inventories
173(1)
Formative Evaluation Methods
174(1)
Authentic Assessment
175(1)
Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics
176(7)
Interindividual Variation
176(1)
Intraindividual Variation
176(1)
Academic Achievement Problems
177(2)
Perceptual, Perceptual-Motor, and General Coordination Problems
179(1)
Disorders of Attention and Hyperactivity
179(1)
Memory, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Problems
180(2)
Social-Emotional Problems
182(1)
Motivational Problems
182(1)
The Child with Learning Disabilities as an Inactive Learner with Strategy Deficits
182(1)
Educational Considerations
183(9)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
184(1)
Educational Methods for Academic Problems
184(3)
Educational Methods for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders
187(1)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
188(4)
Service Delivery Models
192(1)
Early Intervention
192(2)
Transition
194(12)
Factors Related to Successful Transition
194(2)
Secondary Programming
196(3)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Learning Disabilities in General Education Classrooms
199(7)
E. Jane Nowacek
Summary
206(2)
Emotional or Behavioral Disorders
208(48)
Terminology
210(2)
Definition
212(3)
Definitional Problems
212(1)
Current Definitions
213(2)
Classification
215(3)
Prevalence
218(1)
Causes
219(6)
Biological Factors
220(1)
Family Factors
221(1)
School Factors
222(1)
Cultural Factors
223(2)
Identification
225(1)
Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics
226(7)
Intelligence and Achievement
226(1)
Social and Emotional Characteristics
227(4)
Characteristics Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
231(1)
Characteristics Associated with Schizophrenia, Autism, and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders
232(1)
Educational Considerations
233(11)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
234(1)
Contrasting Conceptual Models
235(4)
Balancing Behavioral Control with Academic and Social Learning
239(1)
Importance of Integrated Services
239(1)
Strategies That Work
239(1)
Service Delivery Models
240(2)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
242(2)
Early Intervention
244(4)
Transition
248(6)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders in General Education Classrooms by Peggy L. Tarpley
249(5)
Summary
254(2)
Communication Disorders
256(52)
Definitions
258(3)
Prevalence
261(2)
Language Development
263(3)
Sequence of Development
263(1)
Theories of Development
264(2)
Language Disorders
266(11)
Classification
266(4)
Strategies for Assessment and Intervention
270(1)
Language Disorders Associated with Autism
271(3)
Delayed Language Development
274(2)
Language Disorders Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
276(1)
Educational Considerations
277(5)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
280(2)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
282(6)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
284(4)
Communication Variations
288(3)
Speech Disorders
291(4)
Voice Disorders
291(1)
Articulation Disorders
292(1)
Fluency Disorders
293(1)
Speech Disorders Associated with Neurological Damage
294(1)
Early Intervention
295(3)
Transition
298(8)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Communications Disorders in General Education Classrooms
301(5)
E. Jane Nowacek
Summary
306(2)
Hearing Impairment
308(44)
Definition and Classification
310(3)
Prevalence
313(1)
Anatomy and Physiology of the Ear
314(1)
The Outer Ear
314(1)
The Middle Ear
314(1)
The Inner Ear
315(1)
Measurement of Hearing Ability
315(2)
Pure-Tone Audiometry
315(1)
Speech Audiometry
316(1)
Test for Young and Hard-to-Test Children
316(1)
School Screening
317(1)
Causes
317(2)
Conductive, Sensorineural, and Mixed Impairments
317(1)
Impairments of the Outer Ear
317(1)
Impairments of the Middle Ear
317(1)
Impairments of the Inner Ear
318(1)
Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics
319(5)
English Language and Speech Development
319(1)
Intellectual Ability
320(1)
Academic Achievement
321(1)
Social Adjustment
322(2)
Educational Considerations
324(15)
Oral Approach: Auditory-Verbal Approach and Speechreading
325(2)
Total Communication
327(1)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
328(4)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
332(2)
Service Delivery Models
334
Controversy over Using ASL in the Classroom
330(6)
Technological Advances
336(3)
Early Intervention
339(1)
Transition
340(10)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Hearing Impairment in General Education Classrooms
344(6)
E. Jane Nowacek
Summary
350(2)
Visual Impairment
352(42)
Definition and Classification
354(2)
Legal Definition
354(2)
Educational Definition
356(1)
Prevalence
356(1)
Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye
356(1)
Measurement of Visual Ability
357(1)
Causes
358(2)
Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics
360(9)
Language Development
360(1)
Intellectual Ability
361(1)
Mobility
362(3)
Academic Achievement
365(1)
Social Adjustment
365(1)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
366(3)
Educational Considerations
369(11)
Braille
369(3)
Success Stories: Special Educators as Work
372(1)
Use of Remaining Sight
372(2)
Listening Skills
374(1)
Mobility Training
374(4)
Technological Aids
378(1)
Service Delivery Models
379(1)
Early Intervention
380(1)
Transition
381(11)
Independent Living
381(5)
Employment
386(1)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Visual Impairment in General Education Classrooms
387(5)
E. Jane Nowacek
Summary
392(2)
Physical Disabilities
394(56)
Definition and Classification
396(2)
Prevalence and Need
398(1)
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
399(3)
Definition and Variety of Causes
399(1)
Prevalence and Common Causes
400(1)
Effects
400(2)
Educational Implications
402(1)
Other Neurological Impairments
402(8)
Cerebral Palsy
403(2)
Seizure Disorder (Epilepsy)
405(2)
Spina Bifida
407(1)
Autism and Other Neurological Disorders Not Causing Paralysis
408(1)
Musculoskeletal Conditions
409(1)
Other Conditions Affecting Health or Physical Ability
410(1)
Congenital Malformations
411(2)
Accidents
411(1)
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
411(1)
Children Born to Substance-Abusing Mothers
412(1)
Children Who are Medically Fragile and Children Dependent on Ventilators or Other Medical Technology
412(1)
Prevention of Physical Disabilities
413(3)
Child Abuse and Neglect
413(3)
Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics
416(4)
Academic Achievement
416(1)
Personality Characteristics
417(3)
Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Adaptive Devices for Daily Living
420(5)
Educational Considerations
425(8)
Individualized Planning
426(1)
Educational Placement
426(1)
Educational Goals and Curricula
427(1)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
428(1)
Links with Other Disciplines
429(1)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
430(3)
Early Intervention
433(2)
Transition
435(13)
Choosing a Career
437(4)
Sociosexuality
441(1)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students with Physical Disabilities in General Education Classrooms
442(6)
Peggy L. Tarpley
Summary
448(2)
Giftedness
450(46)
Definition
452(8)
Federal and State Definitions
455(1)
Changes in the Definition of Giftedness
455(4)
A Suggested Definition
459(1)
Prevalence
460(1)
Origins of Giftedness
460(4)
Genetic and Other Biological Factors
461(1)
Social Factors
462(2)
Identification of Giftedness
464(3)
Physical, Psychological, and Behavioral Characteristics
467(4)
Cultural Values Regarding Gifted Students and Their Education
469(1)
The Educational Reform Movement and Controversy Regarding the Education of Students Who are Gifted and Talented
470(1)
Neglected Groups of Gifted Students
471(5)
Gifted Students Who are Underachievers
472(1)
Gifted Students from Cultural- and Ethnic-Minority Groups
473(1)
Gifted Students with Disabilities
474(2)
Gifted Females
476(1)
Educational Considerations
476(5)
Success Stories: Special Educators at Work
478(1)
Acceleration
478(2)
Models of Enrichment
480(1)
Teachers of Gifted Students
481(3)
Collaboration: A Key to Success
482(2)
Early Intervention
484(3)
Transition
487(7)
Suggestions for Teaching: Students Who are Gifted and Talented in General Education Classrooms
489(5)
Peggy L. Tarpley
Summary
494(2)
Parents and Families
496(31)
Professionals' Changing Views of Parents
498(3)
The Effects of a Child with a Disability on the Family
501(8)
Parental Reactions
501(5)
Sibling Reactions
506(3)
Family Involvement in Treatment and Education
509(14)
The Family Systems Approach
510(6)
A Social Support Systems Approach
516(3)
Communication between Parents and Professionals
519(4)
In Conclusion
523(2)
Summary
525(2)
Glossary 527(10)
References 537(33)
Name Index 570(6)
Subject Index 576


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