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Exploring Social Change : America and the World,9780130918383
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Exploring Social Change : America and the World

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130918383

ISBN10:
0130918385
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $93.40
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Summary

This introduction to social change focuses on theories that explain social change, innovation, social movements, and revolutions. The last part of the book shifts explicitly to the global level to analyze population and environmental issues and globalization. Within this framework, the book discusses topics about change and its problems familiar in sociology and social science.

Table of Contents

Preface viii
By Way of Introduction
1(12)
What Is Social Change?
4(6)
Sociology and Social Change
10(1)
What You Can Expect from This Book and How It Is Organized
10(3)
PART ONE SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE UNITED STATES
American Social Trends
13(14)
Structural Trends
14(4)
Changing Cultural Themes
18(4)
Countertrends and Reactions: Anti- and Postmodernism
22(2)
In Conclusion
24(1)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
25(2)
Change and the Settings of Everyday Life: Population, Families, and Work
27(19)
Demographic Change
27(5)
Changing Families
32(6)
Transforming Work
38(6)
In Conclusion
44(1)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
44(2)
Economics, Politics, and the American Prospect
46(24)
The Changing Economy
46(6)
Change in the Political System
52(9)
Change, Problems, and the American Prospect
61(4)
In Conclusion
65(3)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
68(2)
PART TWO EXPLAINING CHANGE
The Causes and Patterns of Change
70(29)
Theory in Sociology
71(1)
The Causes of Change
72(1)
Materialistic Perspectives
72(3)
Idealistic Perspectives
75(6)
Patterns of Change
81(15)
In Conclusion
96(1)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
97(2)
Social Theory and Social Change
99(28)
Functionalist Theory
100(6)
Conflict Theory
106(9)
Interpretive Theory
115(8)
Multiple Perspectives and Change: Reconciling Agency and Structure
123(2)
In Conclusion: Large-Scale Change and Human Agency
125(1)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
125(2)
PART THREE PROCESSES OF SOCIAL CHANGE
Social Movements
127(24)
What Are Social Movements?
128(2)
Types of Social Movements
130(2)
Explaining the Origins of Social Movements
132(17)
In Conclusion
149(1)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
149(2)
American Reform Movements and Social Change
151(27)
The Social Context of Twentieth-Century American Reform Movements
151(2)
Social Class and Reform Movements at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
153(9)
Social Status and Reform Movements at Mid-Twentieth Century
162(12)
In Conclusion: What Kinds of Change Do Reform Movements Accomplish?
174(2)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
176(2)
Revolutions
178(32)
What Is a Social Revolution?
178(1)
Theories of Revolution?
179(11)
The Outcomes of Revolution
190(1)
A World Revolution: The Collapse of the Communist System
190(16)
In Conclusion: But Was It a Revolution?
206(2)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
208(2)
Technology, Innovation, and Networks
210(26)
Innovation as a Change Process
210(2)
The Act of Innovation
212(2)
Sources of Innovation: Social and Cultural
214(6)
Diffusion: How Innovations Spread
220(5)
Adoption of Innovation: Social Systems and Individuals
225(1)
Institutional Change and the Spread of Innovations
226(2)
Social Networks
228(4)
In Conclusion: Back at the Information Technology Revolution
232(3)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
235(1)
Creating Change
236(28)
Creating Change in Omaha: Muddling Through and Planning
238(5)
Basic Change Strategies
243(4)
The Role of Violence in Creating Change
247(3)
Mixed and Complex Strategies
250(4)
Being a Change Agent
254(4)
The Ethics of Inducing Change
258(2)
In Conclusion: Some Final Thoughts about the Feasibility of Creating Change
260(2)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
262(2)
PART FOUR GLOBAL CHANGE
The Emerging Global System: Development and Globalization
264(30)
Two Worlds
265(2)
What Is Development?
267(1)
Uneven Development
268(4)
Developmentalist Thinking: Perspectives and Dimensions
272(5)
Explaining Failed Development
277(1)
Dependency and World Systems Theory
278(2)
Structure and Dynamics of the World System
280(6)
Globalization
286(5)
In Conclusion: Development, Globalization, and Human Progress
291(2)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
293(1)
Society, Environment, and Change
294(24)
Ecological Perspectives on Change and Problems
294(3)
Aspects of Ecological Change and Problems
297(9)
Human Impacts and Global Environmental Change
306(7)
In Conclusion: Societies, Environment, and Global Stability
313(3)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
316(2)
World Futures
318(26)
New World Order or New World Chaos?
319(1)
Looking at the Next Fifty Years
320(11)
Prophetic Visions: Some Longer Views
331(9)
In Conclusion: The Third Revolution
340(3)
Thinking Personally about Social Change
343(1)
Epilogue: Living in a Rapidly Changing World 344(4)
References 348(32)
Author Index 380(3)
Subject Index 383

Excerpts

This is a book for all those who are curious about social change. It is also about how sociologists study change. It is about the substance of social change in the United States and the contemporary world; it is also about the usefulness of sociological ideas for, understanding change and methods of inquiry that have been used to understand social change. We think the topic of social change is of intrinsic interest to everyone, since its pervasive impact is felt by all and is often the cause of considerable perplexity. Sociological perspectives are uniquely suited to illuminate social change because of their holistic treatment of the different aspects of social life that other disciplines (politics, law, economics) address in a more partial way. Sociology is also a lively and contentious discipline, and we have not ignored sociological controversies or omitted complex ideas that defy oversimplification. The book requires some background, but we have tried to write a book for relative newcomers to sociology, avoiding the most arcane jargon and professional idiom for what we hope are clear language and fertile examples. It is about "big" issues, but we have tried to write in a way that engages the life experience of individuals. The topics of the book are based on what we think is important to communicate about social change based on years of teaching and thinking about it. Others may not agree. It begins with a synoptic overview of recent change in American society.Americahere refers to the United States, and when we refer to other Western Hemispheric nations, we will use their proper names, or other terms likeNorth AmericaorLatin America.Middle chapters deal with selected change processes and with sociological theories of change. The later chapters are about global change processes in the modern world. A more descriptive overview of the chapter topics and organization of the book occurs at the end of Chapter 1, so we won't elaborate more here. Writing a book involves the minds and energies of many people besides the authors. Harper would like to acknowledge his indebtedness to five teachers who have been particularly influential in his intellectual development: Ray Cuzzort, Ernest Manheim, Oscar Eggers, Jerry Cloyd, and Jack Siegman. He would also like to thank his students and colleagues at Creighton University who put up with him over the years through several editions, especially the diverse contributions of Tom Mans, Sue Crawford, and James T. Ault. Harper also thanks Barbara Braden, Dean of the Creighton University Graduate College, for her material support during the completion of the fourth edition. He also thanks professional colleagues for their support and critical feedback over the years, including Prentice Hall reviewers Gerry Cox of Black Hills State University; David Swift of the University of Hawaii; Mark Mantyh of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and Becky M. Trigg of the University of Alabama, Birmingham. Leicht first and foremost owes an immeasurable debt of gratitude to Charles Harper for his capable guidance and friendship over the past twenty years. He also owes a great deal to James T. Ault for taking a Nebraska boy who was a little wet behind the ears and turning him into a productive member of the social science community. When he was offered the opportunity to help with the revision of this text, he jumped at the chance in part because of the experiences he had as an undergraduate at Creighton University. He sincerely hopes that this text inspires others to think critically about the world around them, whether they decide to become sociologists or not. We owe a special debt of gratitude to the editorial staff of Prentice Hall, particularly Sharon Chambliss, the supportive and congenial "editor in charge" of the project, and Nancy Roberts, Publisher, who has been a constant source of unobtrusive encouragement and the most human face in a distant cor


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