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Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality : Collaborating for Empowerment,9780130163035
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Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality : Collaborating for Empowerment

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130163035

ISBN10:
0130163031
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $67.00
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Summary

This book is for courses that prepare special and general educators and related service providers to form successful partnerships with families of children with disabilities. Written by the best-known authors in the field of family and professional collaboration, this practical text instructs teachers and families how to empower, collaborate, and advocate for children with special needs. It retains the features of the third edition-the family systems perspectives, an emphasis on empowerment through parent/family and professional collaboration, and a multicultural approach. The authors have created a framework that transforms the complex theory of empowerment and implements techniques into an approach that is easy to understand and to apply.

Table of Contents

Part One Understanding Empowerment 1(82)
Historical and Current Roles of Families and Parents
2(14)
Parents as the Source of Their Child's Disability
4(1)
Parents as Organization Members
5(3)
Parents as Service Developers
8(1)
Parents as Recipients of Professionals' Decisions
8(1)
Parents as Teachers
9(1)
Parents as Political Advocates
10(2)
Parents as Educational Decision Makers
12(1)
Families as Collaborators
12(2)
Summary
14(2)
Schools as Systems: The Context for Family-Professional Collaboration
16(22)
General Education Reform Movement
18(4)
Enhancing the Curriculum and Student Outcomes
18(1)
Restructuring School Governance
19(1)
Reshaping Service Delivery
19(1)
Nature of Family-Professional Collaboration Model within General Education
19(3)
Special Education Reform Movement
22(8)
Reshaping the Provision of Free, Appropriate Public Education
22(3)
Restructuring Placement
25(1)
Nature of Family-Professional Collaboration with Special Education
26(4)
Unified Systems Reform
30(6)
Improving Student Outcomes
31(2)
Encouraging Site-Based Management
33(1)
Convergence of General and Special Education Model of Family-Professional Collaboration
33(3)
Summary
36(2)
Empowerment
38(18)
Definition and Rationale
40(1)
Empowerment Framework
41(8)
Overview
41(2)
Family and Professional Resources
43(6)
Education Context Resources
49(1)
Collaboration
50(4)
Overview
50(2)
Collective Empowerment
52(1)
Empowerment as a Developmental Process
53(1)
Summary
54(2)
Building Reliable Alliances
56(27)
Knowing Yourself
58(1)
Knowing Families
59(1)
Honoring Cultural Diversity
60(7)
Definition and Rationale
61(1)
Framework to Enhance Cultural Competence
62(5)
Affirming and Building on Family Strengths
67(1)
Promoting Family Choices
68(1)
Affirming Great Expectations
69(1)
Communicating Positively
70(10)
Nonverbal Communication Skills
70(3)
Verbal Communication Skills
73(2)
Influencing Skills
75(2)
Group Communication
77(2)
Using Communication Skills in Difficult Situations
79(1)
Improving Communication Skills
80(1)
Warranting Trust and Respect
80(1)
Summary
81(2)
Part Two Understanding Families 83(94)
Family Characteristics
84(22)
Characteristics of the Family
86(10)
Family Size and Form
86(3)
Cultural Background
89(5)
Socioeconomic Status
94(1)
Geographic Location
95(1)
Personal Characteristics
96(3)
Characteristics of a Member's Exceptionality
96(2)
Family Health
98(1)
Coping Styles
99(1)
Special Challenges
99(5)
Families in Poverty
99(2)
Families with Substance Abuse
101(1)
Parents with Disabilities
101(3)
Summary
104(2)
Family Interaction
106(24)
Assumptions of Family Systems Theory
108(2)
Input/Output
108(1)
Wholeness and Subsystems
109(1)
Boundaries
110(1)
Family Subsystems
110(12)
Marital Partner Interactions (The Marital Subsystem)
110(3)
Parent and Child Interactions (The Parental Subsystem)
113(5)
Brother and Sister Interactions (The Sibling Subsystem)
118(2)
Extended-Family Interactions (The Extended-Family Subsystem)
120(2)
Cohesion and Adaptability
122(6)
Cohesion
124(2)
Adaptability
126(2)
Summary
128(2)
Family Functions
130(22)
The Impact of Exceptionality on Family Functions
133(14)
Affection Needs
133(1)
Self-Esteem Needs
134(3)
Spiritual Needs
137(2)
Economic Needs
139(1)
Daily Care Needs
140(2)
Socialization Needs
142(1)
Recreation Needs
142(4)
Education Needs
146(1)
Time as a Factor in Meeting Family Functions
147(3)
Summary
150(2)
Family Life Cycle
152(25)
Family Life Cycle Theory
154(2)
Life Cycle Stages
156(14)
Birth and Early Childhood
156(4)
Childhood
160(3)
Adolescence
163(3)
Adulthood
166(4)
Life Cycle Transitions
170(1)
Uncertainty About the Future
171(4)
Off-Time Transitions
173(2)
Summary
175(2)
Part Three Collaborating for Empowerment 177(196)
Communicating Among Reliable Allies
178(26)
Identifying and Respecting Family Preferences
182(2)
Gaining a Family Systems Perspective
182(1)
Respecting Family Preferences
183(1)
Making Accommodations for Linguistic Diversity
183(1)
Written Strategies for Communication
184(6)
Handbooks
184(1)
Handouts
184(1)
Newsletters
185(2)
Letters, Notes, and Dialogue Journals
187(1)
Report Cards, Grading, and Progress Reports
188(1)
Occasional Messages
189(1)
Telephone Contacts
190(1)
Technology Options
191(1)
Face-to-Face Interactions
191(8)
Planned Meetings
192(4)
Making Action Plans (MAPs)
196(2)
Unplanned Meetings
198(1)
Group Family Meetings
199(1)
Linking Our Themes
199(3)
Creating a Reliable Alliance
199(2)
Strengthening Family Factors
201(1)
Summary
202(2)
Meeting Families' Basic Needs
204(28)
Accessing Social Support
206(5)
Group Support
208(1)
One-to-One Support
208(3)
Acquiring Information
211(5)
Parent Information Program
211(2)
Clearinghouses
213(1)
Family Organizations
214(1)
Adults with Exceptionalities
214(1)
Books and Magazines
214(2)
Television and Radio
216(1)
Technology
216(1)
Accessing Economic and Family Support Services
216(6)
Federal Programs
217(3)
State Programs
220(2)
Addressing Issues of Abuse and Neglect
222(4)
Definitions
222(1)
Incidence
222(1)
Pathways
223(1)
Identification
223(1)
Reporting
224(1)
Prevention
224(2)
Linking Our Themes
226(2)
Creating a Reliable Alliance
226(2)
Strengthening Family Resources
228(1)
Summary
228(4)
Referring and Evaluating for Special Education
232(28)
Coordinating the Referral and Evaluation Process
237(1)
Implementing Prereferral Intervention
237(1)
Initiating and Reviewing the Referral
238(1)
Providing Notice and Obtaining Consent
239(2)
Providing Notice
239(1)
Obtaining Consent
240(1)
Supplementing Written Notices and Consent Forms
241(1)
Collecting Evaluation Information
241(7)
Family Participation in Collecting Evaluation Information
243(5)
Right of Parents to Obtain Independent Evaluations
248(1)
Analyzing Evaluation Information
248(1)
Discussing Evaluation Results with Parents
248(7)
Notifying Parents
248(1)
Taking the Families' Perspective
249(2)
Fostering a Reliable Alliance
251(1)
Considering the Student's Role in Discussing Evaluation Results
252(1)
Following an Agenda for Discussing Results
252(3)
Informing Parents of the Individualized Program Conference
255(1)
Linking Our Themes: Building a Reliable Alliance
255(3)
Linking Our Themes: Strengthening Family Resources
258(1)
Summary
259(1)
Individualizing for Appropriate Education
260(34)
Legal Requirements
262(4)
Individualized Education Program (IEP)
262(3)
Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
265(1)
Review of Research on IEP/IFSP Partnerships
266(3)
Opportunities for Collaboration
269(20)
Preparing in Advance
272(4)
Attending to Advance Preparation
276(1)
Connecting and Getting Started
277(1)
Sharing Visions, Great Expectations, and Strengths
278(1)
Reviewing Formal Evaluation and Current Levels of Performance
278(2)
Developing Goals and Objectives (or Outcomes)
280(2)
Specifying Placement, Supplementary Aids/Services, and Related Services
282(6)
Specifying Assessment Modifications and Special Factors
288(1)
Summarizing and Concluding
288(1)
Linking Our Themes
289(2)
Creating a Reliable Alliance
289(1)
Strengthening Family Factors
289(2)
Summary
291(3)
Extending Learning into Home and Community
294(34)
Incorporating Person-Centered Planning
296(5)
Fostering Homework Collaboration
301(6)
Family Concerns about Homework
302(2)
Suggestions for Homework Collaboration
304(3)
Implementing Positive Behavioral Support
307(9)
Definition of Positive Behavioral Support
308(1)
School-Wide Positive Behavioral Support
308(8)
Integrating Services
316(5)
Linking Our Themes
321(4)
Creating a Reliable Alliance
321(4)
Strengthening Family Factors
325(1)
Summary
325(3)
Attending and Volunteering at School
328(20)
Attending School Events
330(4)
Attending General School Events
330(2)
Attending Extracurricular Activity Events
332(2)
Contributing to Classroom Instruction
334(3)
Contributing to Other School Tasks
337(1)
Attending Classes of Their Own
338(1)
Participating in the Parent-Teacher Organization
339(1)
Participating in Family Resource Centers
340(1)
A Comprehensive Program
341(1)
Linking Our Themes
342(3)
Creating a Reliable Alliance
342(1)
Strengthening Family Factors
342(3)
Summary
345(3)
Advocating for Systems Improvement
348(25)
Becoming an Advocate
350(8)
Definition
350(1)
Places, People, Issues, and Orientation for Advocacy
350(3)
Sources and Levels of Advocacy
353(1)
Monitoring and Advisory Committees
354(1)
Advocacy, Collaboration, and Empowerment
355(3)
Advocating for Change through Standards-Based School Reform
358(6)
Current Status
358(1)
Roles in Advocating for School Reform
359(3)
Advocating for Change in Parental Participation
362(2)
Advocating for Change through Legislative and Judicial Processes
364(6)
National Influence
364(1)
State/Local Influence
365(1)
Influencing Policy through the Courts
365(1)
Creating a Reliable Alliance
366(1)
Strengthening Family Factors
366(4)
Summary
370(3)
Appendix A 373(10)
Appendix B 383(6)
References 389(46)
Index 435

Excerpts

Preface Welcome toFamilies, Professionals, and Exceptionality: Collaborating for Empowerment.This, our fourth edition, retains the features of the third--the family systems perspective, an emphasis on empowerment through parent/family and professional collaboration, and a multicultural approach. In addition, this edition highlights ten of the same families who appeared in the third edition: the Smith family (chapter 1), the Cooper family (chapter 3), the Rocco family (chapter 4), the Cofresi family (chapter 5), the Benito family (chapter 6), the Battles family (chapter 7), the Baccus-Luker family (chapter 8), the Manos family (chapter 9), the Hoyt family (chapter 14), and the Roach family (chapter 15). This edition, however, adds five new families: the Wade family (chapter 2), the Markey family (chapter 10), the Lee family (chapter 11), the Motley family (chapter 12), and the Gonzalez family (chapter 13). Text Organization This text is organized into three parts. Part 1, "Understanding Empowerment," describes the concept of empowerment historically and currently. Part 2, "Understanding Families," describes families as interactive systems, enabling you to understand them from a systems perspective. Part 3, "Collaborating for Empowerment," explains how you can empower families, professionals, and yourself by using seven opportunities for partnerships and by committing to eight obligations to develop reliable alliances. We not only present the theory of empowerment, but we also suggest techniques for advancing empowerment through collaboration. And we synthesize the literature on empowerment, relying on the concepts and research dates reported in several disciplines. Through our synthesis, we create a framework that transforms this complex theory and implements techniques into an approach that is easy to understand and apply. Throughout the text we emphasize mutual empowerment, believing that whatever empowers one person should and can empower another. As one person in a collaborative partnership becomes more empowered, so will all of them. Empowerment, after all, is a value that families, professionals, and you as an individual can pursue and obtain through collective action. Text Features We bring together theory, research, and the best practices related to family-professional partnership from both general and special education. The effort to merge these two bodies of knowledge is, we believe, a "first." With this merger comes the opportunity for families of all students to participate in tomorrow's schools in a more empowered and effective way. In each chapter, we feature "family voices," portraying a family in the opening and closing vignette and relying on the family's experience and voice throughout the chapter. The vignette and the "My Voice" feature are not ornamental. Rather, they are instrumental, linking the concepts and content of the chapter to real families, real professionals, and real schools. Through these voices, you will acquire a richer, real-life understanding of the family systems approach. These families and professionals speak with many dialects and accents; represent a broad spectrum of American life; and show how people of every economic and social stratum, of every color, race, and ethnic origin, in every part of this country empower themselves, their family members, and their colleagues in schools and communities. To repeat: Empowerment is for everyone, and these voices show exactly how everyone can become more empowered through collaboration. The chapters are strong theoretically and empirically in terms of their research base. Just as important (because we want this book to make a difference for you and others, personally and professionally), each chapter is highly applied, setting out techniques for you and others to use in collaborating for empowerment. The "Together We Can" and "Tips" features exemplify


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