9781118863633

The Family Life Project An Epidemiological and Developmental Study of Young Children Living in Poor Rural Communities

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781118863633

  • ISBN10:

    1118863631

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2013-11-04
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $43.99 Save up to $1.32
  • Buy New
    $42.67
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    SPECIAL ORDER: 1-2 WEEKS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

About 20% of children in the United States live in rural communities,
with child poverty rates higher and geographic isolation from resources
greater than in urban communities. Yet, there have been surprisingly
few studies of children living in rural communities, especially poor
rural communities. The Family Life Project helped fi ll this gap by
using an epidemiological design to recruit and study a representative
sample of every baby born to a mother who resided in one of six
poor rural counties over a one year period, oversampling for poverty
and African American. 1,292 children were followed from birth to
36 months of age. This study used a cumulative risk framework to
examine the relation between social risk and children’s executive
functioning, language development, and behavioral competence at
36 months. Using both the Family Process Model of development and
the Family Investment Model of development, observed parenting was
examined as a mediator and/or moderator of this relationship. Results
suggested that cumulative risk predicted all three major domains of
child outcomes and that positive and negative parenting and maternal
language complexity were mediators of these relations. Maternal
positive parenting was found to be a buffer for the most risky families
in predicting behavioral competence. In a fi nal model using both
family process and investment measures, there was evidence of
mediation but with little evidence of the specifi city of parenting for
particular outcomes. Discussion focused the implications for possible
intervention strategies that might be effective in maximizing the early
development of these children.

Table of Contents

ABSTRACT          vii
   
       
I. POVERTY, RURALITY, PARENTING, AND RISK: AN INTRODUCTION   
Lynne Vernon-Feagans and Martha Cox       1

II. RECRUITMENT OF THE FAMILY LIFE PROJECT SAMPLE    
Michael Willoughby, Margaret Burchinal, Patricia Garrett-Peters, Roger Mills-Koonce,
Lynne Vernon-Feagans, and Martha Cox       24

III. THE DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMILIES AND CHILDREN     
Patricia Garrett-Peters and Roger Mills-Koonce      36

IV. POVERTY AND ASSOCIATED SOCIAL RISKS: TOWARD A CUMULATIVE RISK FRAMEWORK
Margaret Burchinal and Michael Willoughby      53

V. CUMULATIVE RISK AND ITS RELATION TO PARENTING AND CHILD OUTCOMES AT 36 MONTHS
FLP Key Investigators         66

VI. DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CHILDREN LIVING IN RURAL POVERTY
FLP Key Investigators         92

REFERENCES          109

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS          126

COMMENTARY

RURAL CHILDREN AT RISK         127
Rand D. Conger

CONTRIBUTORS          139

STATEMENT OF EDITORIAL POLICY        142

SUBJECT INDEX          144

Rewards Program

Write a Review