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Family Therapy : Concepts and Methods,9780205269839
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Family Therapy : Concepts and Methods

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780205269839

ISBN10:
0205269834
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/1997
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

The number one text in the field. Leading therapists provide research. Covers solution-focused therapy and narrative therapy. IM/TB, Video, Website.

Author Biography

Richard C. Schwartz was formerly an Associate Professor at The Family Institute at Northwestern University and the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Illinois College of Medicine. Michael P. Nichols is a Professor at the College of William and Mary.

Table of Contents

Foreword xiii(4)
Salvador Minuchin, M.D.
Preface xvii
Part I The Context of Family Therapy 1(140)
1 The Foundations of Family Therapy
1(12)
The Myth of the Hero
3(1)
Psychotherapeutic Sanctuary
4(2)
Family versus Individual Therapy
6(1)
Psychology and Social Context
7(1)
The Power of Family Therapy
8(2)
Contemporary Cultural Influences
10(1)
Thinking in Lines: Thinking in Circles
11(1)
References
12(1)
2 The Evolution of Family Therapy
13(54)
The Undeclared War
14(2)
Small Group Dynamics
16(6)
The Child Guidance Movement
22(2)
The Influence of Social Work
24(2)
Research on Family Dynamics and the Etiology of Schizophrenia
26(10)
Gregory Bateson--Palo Alto
27(4)
Theodore Lidz--Yale
31(1)
Lyman Wynne--National Institute of Mental Health
32(2)
Role Theorists
34(2)
Marriage Counseling
36(1)
From Research to Treatment: The Pioneers of Family Therapy
37(17)
John Bell
38(1)
Palo Alto
38(6)
Murray Bowen
44(3)
Nathan Ackerman
47(4)
Carl Whitaker
51(1)
Ivan Boszormenyi-Nagy
52(1)
Salvador Minuchin
53(1)
Other Early Centers of Family Therapy
54(2)
The Golden Age of Family Therapy
56(4)
Summary
60(3)
References
63(4)
3 Early Models and Basic Techniques: Group Process and Communications Analysis
67(42)
Sketches of Leading Figures
68(3)
Theoretical Formulations
71(4)
Normal Family Development
75(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
76(2)
Goals of Therapy
78(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
79(2)
Techniques
81(6)
Lessons from the Early Models
87(3)
System's Anxiety
90(2)
The Stages of Family Therapy
92(7)
The Initial Telephone Call
92(1)
The First Interview
93(2)
The Early Phase of Treatment
95(2)
The Middle Phase of Treatment
97(1)
Termination
98(1)
Family Assessment
99(5)
The Presenting Problem
99(1)
Understanding the Referral Route
100(1)
Identifying the Systemic Context
100(1)
Stage of the Life Cycle
100(1)
Family Structure
101(1)
Communication
101(1)
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
102(1)
Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse
102(1)
Extramarital Involvements
102(1)
Gender
102(1)
Cultural Factors
103(1)
The Ethical Dimension
103(1)
Working with Managed Care
104(1)
References
105(4)
4 The Fundamental Concepts of Family Therapy
109(32)
Conceptual Influences on the Evolution of Family Therapy
109(18)
Functionalism
110(2)
General Systems Theory
112(4)
Cybernetics of Families
116(4)
From Cybernetics to Structure
120(1)
Satir's Humanizing Effect
121(1)
Bowen and Differentiation of Self
122(1)
Family Life Cycle
123(3)
Miscellaneous Contributions
126(1)
Enduring Concepts and Methods
127(9)
Conclusions
136(1)
References
137(4)
Part II The Classic Schools of Family Therapy 141(174)
5 Bowen Family Systems Therapy
141(36)
Sketches of Leading Figures
142(2)
Theoretical Formulations
144(5)
Differentiation of Self
144(1)
Triangles
145(1)
Nuclear Family Emotional Process
146(1)
Family Projection Process
146(1)
Multigenerational Transmission Process
146(1)
Sibling Position
147(1)
Emotional Cutoff
148(1)
Societal Emotional Process
148(1)
Normal Family Development
149(3)
Development of Behavior Disorders
152(4)
Goals of Therapy
156(2)
Conditions for Behavior Change
158(2)
Techniques
160(10)
Bowenian Therapy with Couples
161(3)
Bowenian Therapy with One Person
164(6)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
170(2)
Summary
172(3)
References
175(2)
6 Experiential Family Therapy
177(28)
Sketches of Leading Figures
178(1)
Theoretical Formulations
179(3)
Normal Family Development
182(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
183(2)
Goals of Therapy
185(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
186(4)
Techniques
190(8)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
198(2)
Summary
200(1)
References
201(4)
7 Psychoanalytic Family Therapy
205(36)
Sketches of Leading Figures
206(2)
Theoretical Formulations
208(4)
Freudian Drive Psychology
208(1)
Self Psychology
208(1)
Object Relations Theory
208(4)
Normal Family Development
212(3)
Development of Behavior Disorders
215(5)
Goals of Therapy
220(3)
Conditions for Behavior Change
223(2)
Techniques
225(10)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
235(1)
Summary
236(1)
References
236(5)
8 Structural Family Therapy
241(30)
Sketches of Leading Figures
242(1)
Theoretical Formulations
243(4)
Normal Family Development
247(2)
Development of Behavior Disorders
249(4)
Goals of Therapy
253(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
254(2)
Techniques
256(10)
Joining and Accommodating
257(1)
Working with Interaction
258(1)
Diagnosing
259(1)
Highlighting and Modifying Interactions
260(2)
Boundary Making
262(1)
Unbalancing
263(2)
Challenging the Family's Assumptions
265(1)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
266(1)
Summary
267(1)
References
268(3)
9 Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy
271(44)
Sketches of Leading Figures
272(3)
Theoretical Formulations
275(3)
Normal Family Development
278(2)
Development of Behavior Disorders
280(2)
Goals of Therapy
282(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
283(3)
Techniques
286(18)
Behavioral Parent Training
286(7)
Behavioral Couples Therapy
293(6)
A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Family Therapy
299(2)
Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction
301(3)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
304(1)
Summary
305(2)
References
307(8)
Part III Recent Developments in Family Therapy 315(132)
10 Family Therapy Enters the Twenty-First Century
315(40)
Erosion of Boundaries
316(1)
Postmodernism
317(1)
Constructivism
318(2)
Collaborative, Conversational Approaches
320(2)
The Hermeneutic Tradition
322(1)
Social Constructionism
323(1)
The Narrative Revolution
324(1)
Family Therapy's Answer to Managed Care: Solution-Focused Therapy
325(1)
Feminism and Family Therapy
326(2)
The Apolitical Machine
326(1)
Mother Blaming
327(1)
Looking through the Lens of Gender
327(1)
Family Violence
328(2)
Multiculturalism
330(2)
Race and Class
332(2)
Gay and Lesbian Issues
334(1)
Specialized Treatments and Knowledges
335(1)
Research Groups
336(1)
Medical and Psychoeducational Family Therapy
337(6)
Psychoeducation and Schizophrenia
337(4)
Medical Family Therapy
341(2)
The Self in the System
343(1)
The Influence of Managed Care
345(1)
Conclusion
346(2)
References
348(7)
11 From Strategic to Solution-Focused: The Evolution of Brief Therapy
355(42)
The MRI, Strategic, and Milan Systemic Models
355(25)
Sketches of Leading Figures
356(2)
Theoretical Formulations
358(4)
Normal Family Development
362(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
362(1)
Goals of Therapy
363(3)
Conditions for Behavior Change
366(1)
Techniques
367(11)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
378(1)
Summary
379(1)
Solution-Focused Therapy
380(9)
Sketches of Leading Figures
381(1)
Theoretical Formulations
382(1)
Normal Family Development
383(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
384(1)
Goals of Therapy
384(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
385(1)
Techniques
386(3)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
389(2)
Summary
391(1)
References
392(5)
12 Narrative Therapy
397(26)
Sketches of Leading Figures
398(2)
Theoretical Formulations
400(4)
Normal Family Development
404(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
405(2)
Goals of Therapy
407(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
408(2)
Techniques
410(6)
Beginning Therapy
410(1)
Externalizing: The Person Is Not the Problem
410(2)
Who's in Charge, the Person or the Problem?
412(1)
Reading between the Lines of the Problem Story
412(1)
Reauthoring the Whole Story
413(1)
Reinforcing the New Story
414(1)
Deconstructing Dominant Cultural Discourses
414(1)
A Case of Sneaky Poo
415(1)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
416(2)
A Therapy of Social Justice
418(1)
Summary
418(2)
References
420(3)
13 Integrative Models
423(24)
Internal Family Systems Therapy
424(11)
Subpersonalities or "Parts"
425(2)
The Self
427(2)
Identifying Parts and Using Parts Language
429(1)
Maintaining Self-Leadership
429(1)
Using the IFS Model with the Family of an Anorexic Child
429(6)
The Metaframeworks Model
435(3)
Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy
438(1)
The Narrative Solutions Approach
439(2)
Integrative Couple Therapy
441(1)
Other Integrative Models
442(1)
Summary
443(1)
References
444(3)
Part IV The Evaluation of Family Therapy 447(88)
14 Comparative Analysis
447(56)
Theoretical Purity and Technical Eclecticism
447(1)
Family Therapist--Artist or Scientist?
448(1)
Theoretical Formulations
449(12)
Families as Systems
449(1)
Stability and Change
450(1)
Past or Present
450(2)
Communication
452(1)
Content/Process
453(2)
Monadic, Dyadic, or Triadic Model
455(2)
The Nuclear Family in Context
457(1)
The Personal as Political
458(1)
Boundaries
459(2)
Normal Family Development
461(3)
Development of Behavior Disorders
464(7)
Inflexible Systems
465(1)
The Function of Symptoms
466(2)
Underlying Dynamics
468(1)
Pathological Triangles
469(2)
Goals of Therapy
471(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
472(10)
Action or Insight
473(1)
Change in the Session or Change at Home
474(1)
Duration of Treatment
475(2)
Resistance
477(1)
Family-Therapist Relationship
478(3)
Paradox
481(1)
Techniques
482(11)
Who to Invite
482(2)
Treatment Team
484(1)
Entering the Family System
485(2)
Assessment
487(2)
Decisive Interventions
489(4)
Context and Applicability of the Schools of Family Therapy
493(3)
Selection of a Theoretical Position: Rational and Irrational Factors
496(1)
Summary
497(3)
References
500(3)
15 Family Therapy Research: Science into Practice, Practice into Science
503(32)
How Effective Is Family Therapy?
504(14)
Overall Efficacy of Family Therapy
505(1)
Family Therapy for Adult Disorders
505(5)
Family Therapy for Children's Disorders
510(3)
Family Therapy for Interpersonal Problems
513(1)
Relationship Problems
514(1)
Prevention of Relationship Problems
515(1)
Implications
516(2)
What Makes Family Therapy Effective?
518(8)
The Therapeutic Relationship
519(1)
The Process of Change
520(6)
Implications
526(1)
Practice into Science
526(1)
References
527(8)
Appendix A 535(8)
Appendix B 543(6)
Appendix C 549(8)
Author Index 557(10)
Subject Index 567


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