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Family Therapy : Concepts and Methods,9780205317370
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Family Therapy : Concepts and Methods

by ;
ISBN13:

9780205317370

ISBN10:
0205317375
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
6/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $90.60
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Summary

Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods, the best-selling family therapy book on the market, is the most readable, comprehensive, and timely text available for introductory family therapy courses. This edition emphasizes contemporary approaches such as narrative and solution-focused therapies, and highlights such issues as poverty, social class, ethnicity, and spirituality. There is more emphasis on clinical practice, with clinical examples added throughout the book. There is a new chapter on Research in Family Therapy (Chapter 15). The chapter on Integrative Models (Chapter 13) has been completely updated and now includes information on working with family violence and conducting community family therapy.

Author Biography

Richard C. Schwartz was formerly an Associate Professor at The Family Institute at Northwestern University and the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Illinois College of Medicine. Michael P. Nichols is a Professor at the College of William and Mary.

Table of Contents

Foreword xv
Salvador Minuchin
Preface xix
Part I The Context of Family Therapy
The Foundations of Family Therapy
1(12)
The Myth of the Hero
3(1)
Psychotherapeutic Sanctuary
4(2)
Family versus Individual Therapy
6(1)
Psychology and Social Context
7(1)
The Power of Family Therapy
7(1)
Contemporary Cultural Influences
8(1)
Thinking in Lines; Thinking in Circles
9(2)
Recommended Readings
11(1)
References
11(2)
The Evolution of Family Therapy
13(52)
The Undeclared War
14(2)
Small Group Dynamics
16(5)
The Child Guidance Movement
21(3)
The Influence of Social Work
24(1)
Research on Family Dynamics and the Etiology of Schizophrenia
25(9)
Gregory Bateson---Palo Alto
26(3)
Theodore Lidz---Yale
29(2)
Lyman Wynne---National Institutes of Mental Health
31(2)
Role Theorists
33(1)
Marriage Counseling
34(2)
From Research to Treatment: The Pioneers of Family Therapy
36(18)
John Bell
36(1)
Palo Alto
36(6)
Murray Bowen
42(3)
Nathan Ackerman
45(3)
Carl Whitaker
48(2)
Ivan Boszormenyi-Nagy
50(1)
Salvador Minuchin
50(2)
Other Early Centers of Family Therapy
52(2)
The Golden Age of Family Therapy
54(3)
Summary
57(4)
Recommended Readings
61(1)
References
61(4)
Early Models and Basic Techniques: Group Process and Communications Analysis
65(38)
Sketches of Leading Figures
66(1)
Theoretical Formulations
67(3)
Normal Family Development
70(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
71(2)
Goals of Therapy
73(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
74(2)
Techniques
76(4)
Lessons from the Early Models
80(4)
System's Anxiety
84(1)
The Stages of Family Therapy
85(8)
The Initial Telephone Call
85(2)
The First Interview
87(2)
The Early Phase of Treatment
89(2)
The Middle Phase of Treatment
91(1)
Termination
92(1)
Family Assessment
93(5)
The Presenting Problem
93(1)
Understanding the Referral Route
94(1)
Identifying the Systemic Context
94(1)
Stage of the Life Cycle
94(1)
Family Structure
95(1)
Communication
95(1)
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
96(1)
Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse
96(1)
Extramarital Involvements
96(1)
Gender
96(1)
Cultural Factors
97(1)
The Ethical Dimension
97(1)
Working with Managed Care
98(1)
Recommended Readings
99(1)
References
100(3)
The Fundamental Concepts of Family Therapy
103(34)
Systems Theory
104(5)
History of Systems Thinking
104(5)
Functionalism
109(2)
Structuralism
111(2)
The Legacy of Cybernetics and Structural-Functionalism
113(1)
General Systems Theory
114(3)
Satir's Humanizing Influence
117(1)
Bowen and Differentiation of Self
118(1)
The Road Not Taken
119(3)
Enduring Concepts and Methods
122(12)
Interconnectedness
122(1)
Sequences of Interaction
122(1)
Triangles
123(1)
Circular Causality
124(1)
Indirect Communication
124(1)
Family Structure
125(1)
Function of the Symptom
126(1)
Circumventing Resistance
127(1)
Nonpathological View of People
127(1)
Family of Origin
128(1)
Family Life Cycle
129(2)
Focusing on Strengths
131(1)
Family Narratives
131(1)
The Influence of Culture
132(1)
The One-Way Mirror and Videotaping
133(1)
Conclusions
134(1)
Recommended Readings
135(1)
References
135(2)
Part II The Classic Schools of Family Therapy
Bowen Family Systems Therapy
137(36)
Sketches of Leading Figures
138(2)
Theoretical Formulations
140(5)
Differentiation of Self
140(1)
Triangles
141(1)
Nuclear Family Emotional Process
142(1)
Family Projection Process
142(1)
Multigenerational Transmission Process
142(1)
Sibling Position
143(1)
Emotional Cutoff
144(1)
Societal Emotional Process
144(1)
Normal Family Development
145(2)
Development of Behavior Disorders
147(5)
Goals of Therapy
152(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
153(2)
Techniques
155(10)
Bowenian Therapy with Couples
156(3)
Bowenian Therapy with One Person
159(6)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
165(2)
Summary
167(2)
Recommended Readings
169(1)
References
170(3)
Experiential Family Therapy
173(26)
Sketches of Leading Figures
174(1)
Theoretical Formulations
175(2)
Normal Family Development
177(2)
Development of Behavior Disorders
179(1)
Goals of Therapy
180(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
181(4)
Techniques
185(8)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
193(1)
Summary
194(2)
Recommended Readings
196(1)
References
196(3)
Psychoanalytic Family Therapy
199(36)
Sketches of Leading Figures
200(2)
Theoretical Formulations
202(3)
Freudian Drive Psychology
202(1)
Self Psychology
202(1)
Object Relations Theory
202(3)
Normal Family Development
205(3)
Development of Behavior Disorders
208(5)
Goals of Therapy
213(2)
Conditions for Behavior Change
215(2)
Techniques
217(11)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
228(1)
Summary
229(1)
Recommended Readings
230(1)
References
230(5)
Structural Family Therapy
235(30)
Sketches of Leading Figures
236(1)
Theoretical Formulations
237(4)
Normal Family Development
241(2)
Development of Behavior Disorders
243(4)
Goals of Therapy
247(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
248(2)
Techniques
250(10)
Joining and Accommodating
251(1)
Working with Interaction
252(1)
Diagnosing
253(1)
Highlighting and Modifying Interactions
254(2)
Boundary Making
256(1)
Unbalancing
257(2)
Challenging Unproductive Assumptions
259(1)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
260(1)
Summary
261(2)
Recommended Readings
263(1)
References
263(2)
Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy
265(42)
Sketches of Leading Figures
265(3)
Theoretical Formulations
268(3)
Normal Family Development
271(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
272(3)
Goals of Therapy
275(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
276(3)
Techniques
279(16)
Behavioral Parent Training
279(6)
Behavioral Couples Therapy
285(5)
The Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Family Therapy
290(3)
Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction
293(2)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
295(2)
Summary
297(1)
Recommended Readings
298(1)
References
299(8)
Part III Recent Developments in Family Therapy
Family Therapy Enters the Twenty-First Century
307(40)
Erosion of Boundaries
308(1)
Postmodernism
309(1)
Constructivism
310(1)
Collaborative, Conversational Approaches
311(3)
The Hermeneutic Tradition
314(1)
Social Constructionism
315(1)
The Narrative Revolution
316(1)
Family Therapy's Answer to Managed Care: Solution-Focused Therapy
316(1)
Feminism and Family Therapy
317(2)
The Apolitical Machine
317(1)
Mother Blaming
318(1)
Looking through the Lens of Gender
318(1)
Family Violence
319(1)
Multiculturalism
320(3)
Race
323(2)
Poverty and Social Class
325(2)
Gay and Lesbian Issues
327(1)
Spirituality
328(1)
Tailoring Treatments to Populations and Problems
329(1)
Empirically Based Treatment Programs
330(1)
Medical Family Therapy and Psychoeducation
331(4)
Psychoeducation and Schizophrenia
331(3)
Medical Family Therapy
334(1)
The Self in the System
335(2)
Managed Care
337(1)
Conclusions
338(2)
Recommended Readings
340(1)
References
341(6)
From Strategic to Solution-Focused: The Evolution of Brief Therapy
347(40)
The MRI, Strategic, and Milan Systemic Models
347(1)
Sketches of Leading Figures
348(1)
Theoretical Formulations
349(4)
Normal Family Development
353(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
354(1)
Goals of Therapy
355(2)
Conditions for Behavior Change
357(1)
Techniques
358(11)
The MRI Approach
358(3)
Haley and Madanes Approach
361(4)
The Milan Model
365(3)
Other Contributions
368(1)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
369(1)
Summary
370(1)
Solution-Focused Therapy
371(1)
Sketches of Leading Figures
371(1)
Theoretical Formulations
372(2)
Normal Family Development
374(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
374(1)
Goals of Therapy
374(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
375(1)
Techniques
376(3)
The Woman Who Was Stronger Than She Thought
377(2)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
379(2)
Summary
381(1)
Recommended Readings
382(1)
References
382(5)
Narrative Therapy
387(26)
Sketches of Leading Figures
388(2)
Theoretical Formulations
390(4)
Normal Family Development
394(1)
Development of Behavior Disorders
395(2)
Goals of Therapy
397(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
398(1)
Techniques
399(7)
Beginning Therapy
400(1)
Externalizing: The Person Is Not the Problem
400(1)
Who's in Charge, the Person or the Problem?
401(1)
Reading between the Lines of the Problem Story
402(1)
Reauthoring the Whole Story
403(1)
Reinforcing the New Story
403(1)
Deconstructing Dominant Cultural Discourses
404(1)
Enriching the Story---Telling and Retelling
404(1)
A Case of Sneaky Poo
405(1)
Evaluating Therapy Theory and Results
406(2)
A Therapy of Social Justice
408(1)
Summary
408(1)
Recommended Readings
409(1)
References
410(3)
Integrative Models
413(22)
Eclecticism
414(1)
Selective Borrowing
415(1)
Specially Designed Integrative Models
416(11)
Models Designed to Increase Comprehensiveness
416(4)
Models That Combine Two Distinct Approaches
420(4)
Models Designed for Specific Clinical Problems
424(3)
The Internal Family Systems Model
427(5)
Subpersonalities or ``Parts''
427(1)
The Self as Healer
428(2)
Identifying Parts and Using Parts Language
430(1)
Reassuring the Rag Doll
430(2)
Summary
432(1)
Recommended Readings
433(1)
References
433(2)
Part IV The Evaluation of Family Therapy
Comparative Analysis
435(50)
Theoretical Purity and Technical Eclecticism
435(1)
Family Therapist---Artist or Scientist?
436(1)
Theoretical Formulations
437(11)
Families as Systems
437(1)
Stability and Change
437(1)
Past or Present
438(1)
Communication
439(2)
Process/Content
441(2)
Monadic, Dyadic, or Triadic Model
443(1)
The Nuclear Family in Context
444(2)
The Personal as Political
446(1)
Boundaries
447(1)
Normal Family Development
448(3)
Development of Behavior Disorders
451(7)
Inflexible Systems
452(1)
The Function of Symptoms
453(2)
Underlying Dynamics
455(1)
Pathological Triangles
456(2)
Goals of Therapy
458(1)
Conditions for Behavior Change
459(8)
Action or Insight?
459(2)
Change in the Session or Change at Home
461(1)
Duration of Treatment
462(1)
Resistance
463(1)
Family--Therapist Relationship
464(3)
Techniques
467(10)
Who to Invite
467(2)
Treatment Team
469(1)
Entering the Family System
469(3)
Assessment
472(2)
Decisive Interventions
474(3)
Context and Applicability of the Schools of Family Therapy
477(3)
Selection of a Theoretical Position: Rational and Irrational Factors
480(1)
Summary
481(2)
Recommended Readings
483(1)
References
483(2)
Family Therapy Research: Science into Practice, Practice into Science
485(38)
Myrna L. Friedlander
How Effective Is Family Therapy?
486(16)
Overall Efficacy of Family Therapy
486(1)
Family Therapy for Adult Disorders
487(6)
Family Therapy for Children's Disorders
493(4)
Family Therapy for Interpersonal Problems
497(4)
Implications
501(1)
What Makes Family Therapy Effective?
502(10)
The Therapeutic Relationship
503(2)
The Process of Change
505(6)
Implications
511(1)
Practice into Science
512(1)
References
513(10)
Appendix A Recommended Readings 523(2)
Appendix B Glossary 525(6)
Appendix C Careers and Training 531(8)
Name Index 539(12)
Subject Index 551


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