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Family Therapy : History, Theory, and Practice,9780131725638
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Family Therapy : History, Theory, and Practice

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131725638

ISBN10:
0131725637
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $116.00
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Summary

The fourth edition ofFamily Therapy: History, Theory, and Practice is a comprehensive and developmental textbook. It covers all aspects of working with families. It begins by helping students understand the differences between functional and dysfunctional families. It then explains basic processes involved in treating couples and families before it delves into a dozen theoretical ways of treating families. This text covers the history of family therapy, multicultural aspects of family therapy, ways of working with various types of families, ethical and legal issues in involved in family therapy, and ways of assessing families. This is the most thorough and well written text in the field.

Table of Contents

PART ONE Understanding Families and Family Dynamics
1(50)
Individual and Family Life Cycles
3(26)
What Is a Family?
5(2)
Types of Families
7(2)
Individual and Family Development
9(10)
Individual Life Cycle Development
10(1)
Family Life Development
11(8)
Unifying Individual and Family Life Cycles
19(3)
Implications of Life Cycles for Family Therapy
22(2)
Match of Life Cycles Between Family and Therapist
22(1)
Ethnicity and Life Cycles
23(1)
Illness and Life Cycles
23(1)
Poverty, Professionalism, and Life Cycles
24(1)
Summary and Conclusion
24(5)
Healthy and Dysfunctional Families
29(22)
The Family System and Health
30(2)
Qualities of Healthy Families
32(4)
Commitment
33(1)
Appreciation
33(1)
Willingness to Spend Time Together
33(1)
Effective Communication Patterns
33(1)
Religious/Spiritual Orientation
34(1)
Ability to Deal with Crisis in a Positive Manner
34(1)
Encouragement of Individuals
35(1)
Clear Roles
35(1)
Growth-Producing Structure and Development Patterns
35(1)
Family Life Stressors
36(3)
Expected Life Stressors
37(1)
Unexpected Life Stressors
37(2)
Family Structure and Functionality
39(5)
Symmetrical/Complementary Families
40(1)
Centripetal/Centrifugal Families
40(1)
Cohesion/Adaptability
41(3)
Coping Strategies of Families
44(3)
Implications of Health in Working with Families
47(1)
Summary and Conclusion
48(3)
PART TWO Therapeutic Approaches to Working with Families
51(210)
Rationale and History of Family Therapy
53(24)
The Rationale for Family Therapy
54(1)
Reasons for Working with Families as Opposed to Working with Individuals
55(1)
Family Therapy Through the Decades
56(15)
Family Therapy: Before 1940
56(2)
Family Therapy: 1940 to 1949
58(1)
Family Therapy: 1950 to 1959
58(2)
Family Therapy: 1960 to 1969
60(3)
Family Therapy: 1970 to 1979
63(3)
Family Therapy: 1980 to 1989
66(2)
Family Therapy: 1990 to 1999
68(2)
Family Therapy: 2000 to the Present
70(1)
Summary and Conclusion
71(6)
The Process of Family Therapy
77(28)
The Personhood of Family Therapists
78(1)
Common Problems of Beginning Family Therapists
79(5)
Overemphasis
79(2)
Underemphasis
81(3)
Appropriate Process
84(12)
Pre-Session Planning and Tasks
84(2)
Initial Session(s)
86(4)
Middle Phase of Treatment
90(4)
Termination
94(2)
Adlerian Family Therapy: An Example of Appropriate Process
96(2)
Background of Adlerian Theory
96(1)
Initial Session(s)
97(1)
Middle Phase of Treatment
97(1)
Termination
98(1)
Managed Care and the Process of Therapy
98(1)
Summary and Conclusion
99(6)
Couple and Marriage Enrichment and Therapy
105(24)
Types of Couple and Marriage Treatments
106(1)
Preventive Approaches to Working with Couples
107(1)
Major Theorists for Prevention
108(4)
David and Vera Mace
108(1)
Marriage Education
109(1)
Marriage Enrichment
109(3)
Marriage and Couple Therapy
112(10)
Major Theorists
112(1)
Therapeutic Approaches for Working with Couples
113(1)
Behavioral Couple Therapy (BCT)
113(4)
Cognitive-Behavioral Couple Therapy (CBCT)
117(1)
Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT)
118(4)
Divorce Therapy and Mediation
122(2)
Divorce Therapy
123(1)
Family Mediation
124(1)
Summary and Conclusion
124(5)
Psychodynamic and Bowen Family Therapies
129(26)
Psychodynamic Family Therapy
131(1)
Major Theorists
131(1)
Nathan Ackerman
131(1)
Premises of the Theory
132(2)
Treatment Techniques
134(1)
Transference
134(1)
Dream and Daydream Analysis
134(1)
Confrontation
134(1)
Focusing on Strengths
135(1)
Life History
135(1)
Complementarity
135(1)
Role of the Therapist
135(1)
Process and Outcome
136(1)
Unique Aspects of Psychodynamic Family Therapy
136(3)
Emphases
136(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
137(2)
Bowen Family Therapy
139(1)
Major Theorists
140(1)
Murray Bowen
140(1)
Premises of the Theory
140(3)
Treatment Techniques
143(3)
Genograms
143(2)
Going Home Again
145(1)
Detriangulation
145(1)
Person-to-Person Relationships
146(1)
Differentiation of Self
146(1)
Asking Questions
146(1)
Role of the Therapist
146(1)
Process and Outcome
147(1)
Unique Aspects of the Bowen Family Therapy Approach
148(3)
Emphases
148(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
148(3)
Summary and Conclusion
151(4)
Experiential Family Therapy
155(24)
Major Theorists
156(2)
Virginia Satir
156(1)
Carl Whitaker
157(1)
Premises of the Theory
158(1)
Treatment Techniques
159(9)
Therapists Who Use Few Techniques: Carl Whitaker
159(1)
Therapists Who Use Structured Techniques: Virginia Satir
160(6)
Other Experiential Techniques
166(2)
Role of the Therapist
168(1)
Process and Outcome
169(2)
Unique Aspects of Experiential Family Therapy
171(3)
Emphases
171(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
172(2)
Summary and Conclusion
174(5)
Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapies
179(22)
Major Theorists
180(2)
Gerald Patterson
181(1)
Neil Jacobson
181(1)
Premises of the Theory
182(2)
Types of Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapies
184(2)
Behavioral Parent Training
184(1)
Functional Family Therapy
184(1)
Behavioral Treatment of Sexual Dysfunctions
185(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy
186(1)
Treatment Techniques
186(6)
General Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches
187(1)
Specific Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques
187(5)
Role of the Therapist
192(1)
Process and Outcome
193(1)
Unique Aspects of Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches
193(4)
Emphases
194(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
194(3)
Summary and Conclusion
197(4)
Structural Family Therapy
201(18)
Major Theorists
202(1)
Salvador Minuchin
202(1)
Premises of the Theory
203(4)
Treatment Techniques
207(4)
Joining
207(1)
Disequilibrium Techniques
208(3)
Role of the Therapist
211(1)
Process and Outcome
212(1)
Unique Aspects of Structural Family Therapy
212(3)
Emphases
212(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
213(2)
Summary and Conclusion
215(4)
Strategic and Systemic Family Therapies
219(20)
Strategic Family Therapy
221(1)
Major Theorists
221(1)
Jay Haley
221(1)
Premises of the Theory
222(1)
Treatment Techniques
223(2)
Reframing
223(1)
Directive
223(1)
Paradox
223(1)
Ordeals
224(1)
Pretend
224(1)
Positioning
224(1)
Role of the Therapist
225(1)
Process and Outcome
225(1)
Unique Aspects of Strategic Family Therapy
226(1)
Emphases
226(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
226(1)
Systemic (Milan) Family Therapy
227(1)
Major Theorists
227(2)
Mara Selvini Palazzoli
227(2)
Premises of the Theory
229(1)
Treatment Techniques
229(2)
Hypothesizing
229(1)
Positive Connotation
230(1)
Circular Questioning
230(1)
Invariant/Variant Prescriptions
230(1)
Rituals
230(1)
Role of the Therapist
231(1)
Process and Outcome
231(1)
Unique Aspects of Systemic Therapy
231(3)
Emphases
231(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
232(2)
Summary and Conclusion
234(5)
Solution-Focused and Narrative Family Therapies
239(22)
Solution-Focused Family Therapy
240(1)
Major Theorists
240(1)
Steve deShazer
240(1)
Bill O'Hanlon
241(1)
Premises of the Theory
241(1)
Treatment Techniques
242(2)
Role of the Therapist
244(2)
Process and Outcome
246(1)
Unique Aspects of Solution-Focused Family Therapy
246(3)
Emphases
246(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
247(2)
Narrative Family Therapy
249(1)
Major Theorists
249(1)
Michael White
249(1)
Premises of the Theory
250(1)
Treatment Techniques
250(2)
Externalization of the Problem
250(1)
Influence (Effect) of the Problem on the Person
251(1)
Influence (Effect) of the Person on the Problem
251(1)
Raising Dilemmas
251(1)
Predicting Setbacks
251(1)
Using Questions
251(1)
Letters
252(1)
Celebrations and Certificates
252(1)
Role of the Therapist
252(2)
Process and Outcome
254(1)
Unique Aspects of Narrative Family Therapy
254(3)
Emphases
254(1)
Comparison with Other Theories
255(2)
Summary and Conclusion
257(4)
PART THREE Special Populations in Family Therapy
261(100)
Working with Single-Parent Families
263(24)
Types of Single-Parent Families
264(4)
Single Parenthood as a Result of Divorce
265(1)
Single Parenthood as a Result of Death
265(2)
Single Parenthood by Choice
267(1)
Single Parenthood as a Result of Temporary Circumstances
267(1)
Dynamics Associated with the Formation of Single-Parent Families
268(3)
Dynamics of Single-Parent Families Formed through Divorce
268(1)
Dynamics of Single-Parent Families Formed through Death
269(1)
Dynamics of Single-Parent Families Formed through Choice
269(1)
Dynamics of Single-Parent Families Formed through Temporary Circumstances
270(1)
Single-Parent Mothers and Fathers
271(2)
Families of Single-Parent Mothers
271(1)
Families of Single-Parent Fathers
272(1)
Effects of Divorce or Death on Children in Single-Parent Households
273(1)
Children Who Lose a Parent by Divorce
273(1)
Children Who Lose a Parent by Death
274(1)
Strengths and Challenges Connected with Single-Parent Families
274(2)
Strengths of Single-Parent Families
274(1)
Challenges of Single-Parent Families
275(1)
Approaches for Treating Single-Parent Families
276(3)
Prevention Approaches
276(1)
Family Theory Approaches
277(1)
Other Approaches for Treating Single-Parent Families
278(1)
Role of the Therapist
279(1)
Process and Outcome
279(2)
Summary and Conclusion
281(6)
Working with Remarried Families
287(22)
Forming Remarried Families
288(3)
Common Concerns of Remarried Families
289(1)
Dealing with the Death of a Parent
289(1)
Dealing with the Divorce of a Couple
289(2)
Making Healthy Adjustments in Remarried Families
291(1)
Transitions for Children in Remarried Families
292(1)
Transitions for Parents and Stepparents in Remarried Families
292(1)
Dynamics Associated with Remarried Families
292(1)
Issues Within Remarried Families
293(1)
Strengths and Challenges of Remarried Families
294(5)
Strengths of Remarried Families
294(4)
Challenges of Remarried Families
298(1)
Approaches for Treating Remarried Families
299(3)
Guidance in Retaining Old Loyalties
299(1)
Focus on Parental Involvement
300(1)
Provide Education
300(1)
Assist in the Creation of Family Traditions and Rituals
300(1)
Apply Structural Family Therapy
301(1)
Apply Experiential Family Therapy
301(1)
Do Transgenerational Work
301(1)
Role of the Therapist
302(1)
Process and Outcome
303(1)
Summary and Conclusion
304(5)
Working with Culturally Diverse Families
309(28)
What Is a Culture?
311(1)
Dynamics Associated with Culturally Diverse Families
312(1)
Issues Within Culturally Diverse Families
313(2)
Sensitivity
313(1)
Experience
314(1)
Acceptance
314(1)
Ingenuity
315(1)
Specificity
315(1)
Intervention
315(1)
Approaches for Treating Culturally Diverse Families
315(12)
Gay and Lesbian Families
316(1)
African-American Families
317(3)
Asian-American Families
320(1)
Hispanic/Latino American Families
321(2)
Native American Indian Families
323(2)
Arab Americans
325(1)
European Americans
326(1)
Guidelines for Selecting Treatment Approaches in Working with Culturally Diverse Families
327(1)
Role of the Therapist
328(1)
Process and Outcome
329(1)
Initial Phase of Working with Culturally Diverse Families
329(1)
Middle Phase of Working with Culturally Diverse Families
329(1)
Final Phase of Working with Culturally Diverse Families
330(1)
Summary and Conclusion
330(7)
Working with Substance-Related Disorders, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, and Infidelity
337(24)
Substance-Related Disorders and Families
338(8)
Manifestation of Substance-Related Disorders
339(2)
Engaging Substance-Related Disorder Families in Treatment
341(1)
Approaches for Treating Substance-Related Disorder Families After Engagement
342(4)
Domestic Violence and Families
346(7)
Assessment of Domestic Violence
348(1)
Approaches for Treating Domestic Violence
349(4)
Child Abuse and Neglect in Families
353(2)
Approaches for Treating Child Abuse and Neglect
354(1)
Infidelity
355(2)
Approaches for Treating Infidelity
356(1)
Summary and Conclusion
357(4)
PART FOUR Professional Issues and Research in Family Therapy
361(56)
Ethical Legal, and Professional Issues in Family Therapy
363(26)
Overview of Ethics in Families and Family Therapy
364(1)
Ethics and Values
365(2)
How Do Values Influence Ethical Practice?
367(1)
Guidelines for Making Ethical Decisions
367(3)
Codes of Ethics
367(1)
Educational Resources
368(1)
Professional Consultation
368(1)
Interaction with Colleagues and Supervisors
369(1)
Meta-ethical Principles
369(1)
Common Ethical Concerns
370(4)
Confidentiality
370(1)
Gender Issues
371(1)
Sex Between a Therapist and a Family Member
372(1)
Theoretical Techniques
372(1)
Multicultural Therapy Issues
372(1)
Use of the Internet for On-Line Therapy
373(1)
Addressing Unethical Behavior
374(1)
Legal Issues in Family Therapy
374(1)
The Legal System
374(5)
Types of Law
375(1)
Legal Situations that Involve Family Therapists
376(2)
Issues of Law in Family Therapy
378(1)
Professional Identification as a Family Therapist
379(5)
Demographics: Who Are Marriage and Family Therapists?
379(1)
Organizations Associated with Family Therapy
380(2)
Education of Family Therapists
382(1)
Issues in Professional Identification
383(1)
Summary and Conclusion
384(5)
Research and Assessment in Family Therapy
389(28)
Importance of Research in Family Therapy
391(1)
Research Findings in Family Therapy
391(2)
Two Types of Family Therapy Research
393(2)
Difficulties in Family Therapy Research
395(4)
Design
396(1)
Sampling
396(1)
Instrumentation
397(1)
Procedure
397(1)
Theory
398(1)
Statistics
398(1)
Validity/Reliability
399(1)
The Importance of Assessing Families
399(2)
Dimensions of Assessing Families
400(1)
Methods Used in Assessing Families
401(12)
Informal Methods of Assessing Families
401(1)
Formal Methods of Assessing Families
401(3)
Family Therapy Scales
404(4)
Marital and Couple Therapy Scales
408(5)
Summary and Conclusion
413(4)
Appendix A Family Therapy Through the Decades 417(4)
Appendix B AAMFT Code of Ethics 421(7)
Appendix C IAMFC Ethical Codes 428(8)
Glossary 436(22)
References 458(35)
Name Index 493(10)
Subject Index 503


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