9780262692786

Favored Circle : The Social Foundations of Architectural Distinction

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780262692786

  • ISBN10:

    0262692783

  • Edition: Reprint
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-03-07
  • Publisher: Mit Pr
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Summary

The popular view of architecture focuses on individual creative geniuses, those who have designed the most "significant" works. According to Garry Stevens, however, successful architects owe their success not so much to genius as to social background and a host of other factors that have very little to do with native talent. To concentrate only on the profession of architecture is to ignore the much larger field of architecture, which structures the entire social universe of the architect and of which architects are only one part. This book critically surveys that field, exposing many myths and debunking a number of heroes in the process. Using the conceptual apparatus of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, Stevens describes the field of architecture on two levels. First, he provides a detailed account of the field as it is at any given point in time, describing the different components and their relationships. Second, he analyzes the dynamics of the field through time, from the Renaissance to the present. He discusses the system of architectural education, as well as everyday aspects such as the competition for reputation. He concludes that throughout history, the most eminent architects have been connected to each other by master-pupil and collegiate relations. These networks, which still exist, provide a mechanism for architectural influence that runs parallel to that of the university-based schools.

Table of Contents

Targeting the Favored Circle
2(36)
``Dangerous, Mischievous, Subversive and Offensive''
2(2)
My Puzzled Career
4(4)
Quest for Genius: The Psychological Approach
8(3)
Architecture and the Social
11(6)
Sociologists Are Critical
11(2)
Architects Are Not Socially Minded
13(1)
Architectural Discourse Avoids the Social
14(1)
A Sociology of Architecture Is Redundant
15(2)
Sociological Studies of Architecture
17(6)
Studies of Practice
18(2)
Historical-Theoretical Studies
20(3)
Studying Architecture as a Profession
23(8)
The Sociology of the Professions
25(2)
Defects in a Sociology of ``Profession''
27(4)
Changing the Sociological Study of Architecture
31(5)
Reformulating ``Profession''
31(2)
Abandoning ``Profession'' in the Social Study of Architecture
33(3)
The Sociological Toolkit of Pierre Bourdieu
36(32)
Introducing Bourdieu
36(11)
Bourdieu in the Intellectual Field
37(1)
A Very French Sociologist
38(4)
Bourdieu and Other Thinkers
42(4)
Bourdieu and Architectural Theory
46(1)
Overview of Bourdivin Theory
47(2)
Bourdieu's Formal Sociology
49(10)
The Central Problem of Sociology
49(3)
Bourdieu's Resolution of the Central Problem
52(4)
Linking Practice to Structure
56(3)
Bourdieu's Model of Society
59(9)
Symbolic Power and Culture
59(3)
Symbolic Capital
62(2)
Strategies of Investment
64(1)
Social Space and Class Structure
65(2)
Historical Movement in Social Space
67(1)
Architecture as a Field
68(54)
What Culture Does
68(6)
Culture as a Battlefield between Classes
69(2)
Taste
71(3)
The Field of Culture
74(9)
Fields
74(2)
Field and Habitus
76(2)
Functions of the Field of Culture
78(2)
Ensuring Closure through Culture
80(1)
Outline of the Structure of the Field
81(2)
The Field of Architecture
83(20)
Basic Structure
83(5)
Forms of Capital
88(3)
The Quest for Autonomy
91(3)
A Semi-Autonomous Field
94(4)
Priests and Prophets: Conflict within the Field
98(5)
How the Field Works: Three Examples
103(19)
From Modern Movement to International Style
103(2)
Attacking the Field's Autonomy
105(7)
Decon Comes to Town
112(10)
The Field through Time
122(46)
A Threefold Social Space
122(3)
A Study of Architectural History
125(5)
A Portrait of the Architect
130(7)
The Architects' Nationalities
133(1)
The Architects' Buildings
133(4)
Historical Growth of the Architectural Community
137(14)
Temporal Limits
137(3)
Per Capita Growth
140(3)
The Two Communities of the MEA
143(2)
Growth of the Major Sector
145(2)
Growth of the Minor Sector
147(4)
Historical Dynamics of the Field
151(17)
Dynamics of the Mayor Sector
153(6)
Dynamics of the Minor Sector
159(9)
Understanding Architectural Education
168(44)
The Field's New System of Reproduction
168(19)
The Critique of Architectural Education
170(4)
Britain: Articled Pupilage
174(5)
France: The State Certification Model
179(3)
Germany: Research Enters the Universities
182(2)
The United States: An Uneasy Synthesis
184(3)
How the schools Socialize
187(17)
Favoring the Favored
189(15)
Longevity of the Studio System
204(1)
Architecture as a Discipline
204(8)
The Discipline in the Field
206(1)
Structure of the Discipline
207(3)
Architecture and Related Disciplines
210(2)
Contemporary Transformations
212(12)
The Expansion of the Subordinate Sector
212(2)
The Permanent Crisis in Architectural Education
214(3)
The Critique of the Intellectually Dominant
215(1)
The Critique of the Professionally Dominant
216(1)
Transformations of the Field
217(3)
The New Market for Credentials
217(1)
New Trajectories
218(2)
Explaining Some Puzzles
220(4)
Notes 224(22)
Index 246

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