9780816648610

The First Panoramas: Visions of British Imperialism

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780816648610

  • ISBN10:

    0816648611

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2011-07-28
  • Publisher: Univ of Minnesota Pr
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $29.95 Save up to $4.49
  • Buy New
    $25.46

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 7-10 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

The First Panoramasis a cultural history of the first three decades of the panorama, a three-hundred-sixty-degree visual medium patented by the artist Robert Barker in Britain in 1787. A towering two-story architectural construction inside which spectators gazed on a 10,000-square-foot painting, Barker's new technology was designed to create an impression of total verisimilitude for the observer. In the beautifully illustratedThe First Panoramas, Denise Blake Oleksijczuk demonstrates the complexity of the panoramas' history and cultural impact, exploring specific exhibits:View of Edinburgh and the Adjacent Country from the Calton Hill(1788),View of London from the Roof of the Albion Mill(1791),View of the Grand Fleet Moored at Spithead(1793), and the two different versions ofView of Constantinople(1801). In addition to the art itself, she examines the panoramas' intriguing descriptive keys--single-sheet diagrams that directed spectators to important sites in the representation, which evolved over time to give the observer greater perceptual control over the view. Using the surviving evidence, much of it never published before, on the early exhibitions of these massive installations, Oleksijczuk reconstructs the relationships between specific paintings, their accompanying printed guides, and the collective experiences of different audiences. She argues that by transporting its spectators to increasingly distant locations, first in the city and country and then in the world beyond Britain's borders, the panorama created a spatial and temporal disjunction between "here" and "there" that helped to forge new national and social identities.

Rewards Program

Write a Review