9780521584227

Formation of Structure in the Universe

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521584227

  • ISBN10:

    0521584221

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1999-04-28
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Summary

This advanced textbook provides an up-to-date and comprehensive introduction to the very active field of structure formation in cosmology. It is written by eleven world-leading authorities. Written in a clear and pedagogical style appropriate for graduate students in astronomy and physics, this textbook introduces the reader to a wide range of exciting topics in contemporary cosmology: from recent advances in redshift surveys, to the latest models in gravitational lensing and cosmological simulations. The authors are all world-renowned experts both for their research and teaching skills. In the fast-moving field of structure formation, this book provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a welcome textbook which unites the latest theory and observations.

Table of Contents

List of contributors
xi
Preface xiii
Part one: Introduction to structure formation 1(75)
Dark matter and structure formation
3(73)
J. R. Primack
Introduction
3(4)
Cosmology basics
7(5)
Age, expansion rate, and cosmological constant
12(11)
Measuring Ωo
23(10)
Dark-matter particles
33(9)
Origin of fluctuations: inflation and topological defects
42(12)
Comparing DM models to observations: ACDM vs. CHDM
54(22)
References 76(21)
Gravitational instability
86(11)
A. Yahil
Introduction
86(2)
Linear theory and Zel'dovich approximation
88(2)
Nonlinear methods and mixed boundary conditions
90(7)
References 97(34)
Microwave background and structure formation
98(33)
J. Silk
Introduction
98(1)
Gravitational instabilities: linear theory
99(6)
Nonlinear evolution
105(6)
Galaxy formation by reverse engineering
111(7)
Cosmic microwave background anisotropies
118(5)
Confrontation of theory and large-scale structure
123(3)
Future prospects
126(5)
References 131(38)
Part two: Large-scale structure and flows 133(36)
Clusters and superclusters of galaxies
135(34)
N. A. Bahcall
Introduction
135(1)
Optical properties of galaxy clusters
136(7)
X-ray properties of galaxy clusters
143(8)
The baryon fraction in clusters
151(1)
Cluster masses
152(3)
Where is the dark matter?
155(1)
The mass function of clusters
155(1)
Quasar-cluster association
156(2)
Superclusters
158(2)
The cluster correlation function
160(4)
Peculiar motions of clusters
164(3)
Some unsolved problems
167(2)
References 169(39)
Redshift surveys of the local universe
172(36)
M. A. Strauss
Introduction
172(1)
Varieties of redshift surveys
173(5)
The luminosity and selection function
178(3)
Clustering statistics
181(3)
Measurements of the power spectrum
184(11)
The relative distribution of galaxies and dark matter
195(3)
Surveys for the future
198(8)
Conclusions
206(2)
References 208(39)
Measurement of galaxy distances
213(1)
J. A. Willick
Introduction
213(3)
Cepheid variables
216(3)
The Tully-Fisher relation for spiral galaxies
219(6)
Fundamental Plane relations for elliptical galaxies
225(4)
Surface brightness fluctuations
229(4)
Supernovae
233(4)
Brightest cluster galaxies
237(2)
Redshift-distance catalogs
239(2)
Malmquist and other biases
241(4)
Summary
245(2)
References 247(68)
Large-scale flows and cosmological implications
250(65)
A. Dekel
Introduction
250(3)
Reconstruction from peculiar velocities
253(20)
Testing basic hypotheses
273(7)
Statistics of mass-density fluctuations
280(9)
Direct measurements of Ω from peculiar velocities
289(4)
Measurements of β from galaxy density and velocities
293(13)
Cosmological parameters
306(6)
Conclusion
312(3)
References 315(20)
Part three: Structure on galactic scales and lensing 319(16)
Cosmological simulations
321(14)
J. P. Ostriker
Introduction
321(2)
Simulation methods
323(7)
Results: comparison with observations
330(2)
Conclusions
332(3)
References 335(23)
Black holes in galaxy centers
337(21)
S. M. Faber
Introduction
337(2)
Surface-brightness and stellar distributions
339(6)
Kinematic evidence for central massive black holes
345(13)
References 358(68)
Gravitational lensing
360(66)
R. Narayan
M. Bartelmann
Introduction
360(4)
Lensing by point masses in the universe
364(20)
Lensing by galaxies
384(22)
Lensing by galaxy clusters and large-scale structure
406(20)
References 426(38)
Part four: A conclusion 433(31)
The mass of the universe
435(29)
P. J. E. Peebles
Introduction
435(8)
Dynamical mass measurements
443(12)
The cosmological tests
455(5)
Scorecard and issues
460(3)
Concluding remarks
463(1)
References 464(2)
Index 466

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