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Foundations for Learning Claiming Your Education Plus NEW MyStudentSuccessLab 2012 Update -- Access Card Package,9780321871206

Foundations for Learning Claiming Your Education Plus NEW MyStudentSuccessLab 2012 Update -- Access Card Package

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Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780321871206

ISBN10:
0321871200
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/12/2012
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
Availability:
This title is currently not available.
List Price: $55.67

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Summary

This book is appropriate for courses in First-Year Experience, College Success, and Study Skills. The focus of Foundations for Learningis on academic adjustment with personal development issues seamlessly integrated into the academic emphasis theme of 'claiming an education'and taking responsibility for one's own education. Foundations for Learning addresses both the attitudinal variables and personality traits that affect college achievement like locus of control, conceptions of intelligence, and intellectual curiosity in relation to specific study-related behaviors such as text annotation and active listening. At its core, this text is based on the psychology of adjustment. Students are pushed to consider how each mindset, perception, and attitude connects with their skill sets, and how one influences the other. The text encourages students to use this insight to make the necessary adjustments to their new role as college students. It offers an acute awareness of first-year student needs, an intellectual approach, and a tight framework. It is primarily focused on the development of academic adjustment issues and meta-cognitive strategies as they naturally unfold during the first semester, as opposed to primarily focusing on social adjustment issues or issues that aren’t immediately relevant such as career development and is written in a challenging yet accessible way. This revision covers emerging technologies, broadens its audience, and more.

Author Biography

Laurie L. Hazard holds an Ed.M. in Counseling and an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Teaching from Boston University. She is the Directo fo the Academic Center for Excellence at Bryant University, the Curriculum Coordinator for the First-Year Experience (FYE) course, and teached in the Applied Psychology Department. laurie, and award winning educator, was selected by the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition as a top ten Outstanding First-Year Student Advocate. She also received the Learning Assistance Association of New Englad's Outstanding Research and Publication Award.

    Laurie has been designing curricula for FYE and study skills courses for more than twenty years reflecting her area of expertise: the personality traits and habits of students that influence academic achievement. She has done extensive work assessing the effectiveness of learning assistance programs and FYE courses. She has been a Guest Editorial Board member for the Learning Assistance Review. Publications by Laurie and her co-author include: Exploring the Evidence, Volume III: Reporting Outcomes of First-Year Seminars, a monograph published by the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experieince and Student in Transistion and "What Does It Mean to be 'College-Ready'?, and article which appears in Connection: The Journal of the New England Board of Higher Education.

    Laurie's expertise has recieved national media attention. her interviews include: "Prepare college-bound kids for hard work ahead," which appeared in the Chicago Tribune in 2007 and "Study Tip for College Students" in Seventeen Ma gazine in 2008. most recently, in March 2010, Laurie was interviewed by Associated Press columnist Beth Harpaz for her article "Colleges Don't Like Senior Slump in High School."

 

Jean-Paul (JP) Nadeau earned his Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Composition from the University of Rhode Island and has been teaching first-year composition, basic writing, and literature courses since 1992. Currently he is an Associate Professor of English at Bristol Community College, located in Southeastern Massachusetts, where he is also Chair of the English Department’s Portfolio Assessment Program. He recently co-authored Community College Writers: Exceeding Expectations (Southern Illinois University Press, 2010), a longitudinal study of first-year writers. JP has given dozens of presentations at local and national conferences during the last fifteen years, including the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the Learning Assistance Association of New England Conference, and the Northeast Writing Centers Association Conference. He was recipient of the 2006 Learning Assistance Association of New England Outstanding Research and Publication Award along with his co-author, Laurie Hazard. In that same year he was awarded a research grant from the Calderwood Writing Initiative at the Boston Athenaeum.

Table of Contents

Brief Contents

 

Introduction

 

PART I: Adjusting to the Environment of Higher Education and Understanding Yourself as a College Student

Chapter One Becoming Part of a Scholarly Community

Chapter Two  Developing Academic Self-Concept 

Chapter Three Reconceiving Diversity  

 

Part II: Reflecting On How Mindset Influences Your Study Behaviors and Reaching Your Academic Goals

Chapter Four  Planning, Prioritizing, and Procrastination 

Chapter Five  Developing Malleable Mindsets and Metacognitive Skills  

 

Part III: Implementing Strategies and Habits for Peak Academic Performance

Chapter Six Developing Communication Skills

Chapter Seven  Reading and Taking Notes for Optimal Performance in Lectures and on Exams

Chapter Eight  Taking Responsibility in College and Life

 

Glossary 

 

Index    

 

 

Full Contents

 

Introduction

 

PART I: Adjusting to the Environment of Higher Education and Understanding Yourself as a College Student

 

Chapter One Becoming Part of a Scholarly Community

    The Professor and Student Contract

    Intellectual Curiosity

    Active versus Passive Learning

    Collaboration

    Doing Research

    Plagiarism and Intellectual Property

    Claimining an Education

Chapter Two  Developing Academic Self-Concept 

    Relating to Your Family and Culture: How Developing Academic Self-Concept Has been Developing Up to Now

    Relating to Your New Peers

    Relating in Cyberspace

    Relating to your New Environment

Chapter Three Reconceiving Diversity  

    Diversity in College

    The Difficulty of Defining Diversity

    Define Diversity

    The Downside of Difference

    Delving into Diversity

 

Part II: Reflecting On How Mindset Influences Your Study Behaviors and Reaching Your Academic Goals

 

Chapter Four  Planning, Prioritizing, and Procrastination

    Time Management and Academic Goal Setting

    Time Management and College Success

    Self-Regulating Your Own Learning

        Consider the 8-8-8 Formula

    How to Manage Your Time

        Be Sure to Plan and Organize

        Plan for a suitable Place to Study

        Learn to Avoid Procrasitination

    Behavior Management, Motivation, and Procrastination    

        Procrastiantion and Motivation

        Procrastination has Consequences

        Gaining Control over Procrastination  

Chapter Five  Developing Malleable Mindsets and Metacognitive Skills 

     Why Should I Change?

    Student Attituted Toward Learning

        What is your Locus of Control?

        Measure Your Locus of Control with the Trice Academic Locus of Control Scale

        The Relationship Amoung Locus of Control, Study Habits, and Grade Point Average

    Theories of Intelligence

        Dweck's Mindset Theory    

        Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences

        Goleman's Theory of Emotional Intelligence

    Approaches to Learning

        The Process of Leaning Changes Your Brain

        Thinking Critically

        Identify Your Learning Style(s)

        Writing to Learn and Journal Writing Can Help you Better Understand How You Learn

        Portfolio Development Is Another Useful Metacognitive Activity

        Read Actively to Become a Better Reader

        Text Annotation Encourages Active Reading

 

Part III: Implementing Strategies and Habits for Peak Academic Performance

 

Chapter Six Developing Communication Skills

    Written Products versus the Writing Process

        Prewrite to generate Ideas

        Organize Your Ideas

        Draft Your Ideas

        Revise Each Draft

    Using Feedback to best Advantage

        Your Faculty Provide Feedback via Graded Papers

        Faculty Can Also Provide Feedback During Office Hours

        Your Classmates May Provide Feedback During Peer Review

        The Writing Center Is Another Great Place to Get Feedback

    Participating in Class Discussing

    Writing the Research Paper

        Formulate a Reseach Question

        Find Appropriate and Useful Sources

        Evaluate your Sources

        Selects Potential Material from your Sources

        Utilize the Evidence You Have ollected to Your Best Advantage

        Conduct Your Research Ethically

        The Function of Citation Formats

    Making In-Class Presentations  

Chapter Seven  Reading and Taking Notes for Optimal Performance in Lectures and on Exams

    The Components of Test Preparation

        Be Aware of Course Objectives

        Take Comprehensive Notes

        Connect Important Ideas

        Gather Internal Feedback

        Approaches to Note Taking

        It Is Important to Have an Organized System of Taking Notes

        Use Shorthand When Taking Notes

        Coordinate Yoru Class/Lecture Notes with Your Reading Notes

        The Read Actively, Take Notes Before You Read

        Study with a Group

    Benefits of Employing These Approaches to Studying

    Approaches to Test Taking

        Here is Some Advice for Taking Multiple-Choice Exams

        Here is Some Advice for Responding to True-False QUestions

        In-Class Essay Exams Don't Have to Be So Daunting

    Self-Evaulation ofPreparedness for Test and Exams

Chapter Eight  Taking Responsibility in College and Life

    Foundations for Learning Themes: Developing the Habits of Mind for Success in College and Life

 

Glossary 

 

Index 

 

 

 

 



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