9782894484005

The Franco-americans of New England: Dreams And Realities

by
  • ISBN13:

    9782894484005

  • ISBN10:

    2894484003

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-05-01
  • Publisher: McGill Queens Univ Pr
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Summary

Between 1840 and 1930, approximately 900,000 people left Quebec for the United States and settled in French-Canadian colonies in New England's industrial cities. Yves Roby draws from first-person accounts to explore the conversion of these immigrants and their descendants from French-Canadian to Franco-American. The first generation of immigrants saw themselves as French Canadians who had relocated to the United States. They were not involved with American society and instead sought to recreate their lost homeland. The Franco-Americans of New England reveals that their children, however, did not see a need to create a distinct society. Although they maintained aspects of their language, religion, and customs, they felt no loyalty to Canada and identified themselves as Franco-American.Roby's analysis raises insightful questions about not only Franco-Americans but also the integration of ethno-cultural groups into Canadian society and the future of North American Francophonies.

Author Biography

Yves Roby is with the faculty at Laval University.

Table of Contents

List of Tables
xiii
Acronyms and Abbreviations xv
Acknowledgments xvii
Introduction 1(6)
Leaving for the ``States'' (1840--1900)
7(22)
Before 1860
8(3)
From 1860 to 1900
11(1)
The Quebec countryside and emigration
12(2)
Urban centers and emigration
14(1)
The Acadian emigration
15(1)
A fascination with New England
16(2)
Characteristics of the migratory movement
18(3)
The Little Canadas
21(8)
In the Eye of the Beholder (1865--1900)
29(44)
Turncoats or missionaries?
30(23)
Foreigners or Americans?
53(20)
The Elite and a Changing Reality (1865--1900)
73(44)
``They did not leave the homeland, they brought it with them''
74(12)
The Little Canadas: an arena where the forces of change and the status quo clashed head-on
86(12)
The elite caught between the dream and the reality
98(19)
The Emergence of a Radical Discourse (1865--1900)
117(36)
Two opposing views
118(21)
``The Irish clergy [ ... ] appears to feel nostalgia for oppression''
139(14)
Progress, Crisis, and the Seeds of Dissension (1901--1914)
153(70)
Progress and jubilation
154(7)
Demographic changes and uncertainty
161(6)
The fight against the ``Irish'' Episcopate: new strategies
167(21)
Discourse on change
188(35)
Radicals and Moderates: The Rupture (1914--1929)
223(70)
The sacred union to defy full-fledged Americanism
224(17)
The Sentinellist unrest and the rupture between the moderate faction and the radical militancy
241(28)
The struggle against Anglicization and Americanization: a deeply divided elite
269(24)
``A National Renasence'': Between the Dream and the Reality (1929--1939)
293(72)
The Great Depression
295(18)
Major changes
313(6)
A community completely transformed
319(7)
The elite and survivance
326(23)
Reconciliation
349(16)
``Isolationism... or the Open-Door Policy'' (1939--1956)
365(70)
The Franco-Americans and the Second World War
367(29)
The Franco-American centennial (1949)
396(25)
Thomas-Marie Landry, o.p., at the third Congress of the French Language (1952)
421(8)
Isolationism. . . or the open-door policy?
429(6)
The Elder Generation Stands Down (1956--1976)
435(64)
Traditional Franco-America collapses
436(47)
Conflicts between generations?
483(2)
Isolationism or the open-door policy?
485(14)
Epilogue
499(20)
In pursuit of Father Landry's dream
500(9)
``Survivance is dead in the Little Canadas''
509(4)
The last handful
513(6)
Bibliographic Guidelines 519(8)
Onomastic Index 527(8)
Toponimic Index 535(6)
Subject Index 541

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