CART

(0) items

The French Revolution and Human Rights A Brief Documentary History

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780312108021

ISBN10:
0312108028
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/15/1996
Publisher(s):
Bedford/St. Martin's
List Price: $21.30

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$5.33

Hurry!

Only two copies
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
$13.42

Buy New Textbook

Usually Ships in 7-10 Business Days
$20.77

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $3.94

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 4/15/1996.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

This brief documentary history includes 38 documents that explore the issue of rights and citizenship in Revolutionary France and the movement that helped define modern notions of civil rights.

Author Biography

LYNN HUNT, Eugen Weber Professor of Modern European History at University of California at Los Angeles, received her B.A. from Carleton College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. She is the author of Revolution and Urban Politics in Provincial France (1978), Politics, Culture, and Class in the French Revolution (1984), and The Family Romance of the French Revolution (1992); she is also the co-author of Telling the Truth About History (1994), co-author of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution (2001, with CD-ROM), editor of The New Cultural History (1989), editor and translator of The French Revolution and Human Rights (1996), and co-editor of Histories: French Constructions of the Past (1995), Beyond the Cultural Turn (1999), and Human Rights and Revolutions (2000). She has been awarded fellowships by the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served as president of the American Historical Association in 2002.

Table of Contents

Foreword iii(2)
Preface v
PART ONE Introduction: The Revolutionary Origins of Human Rights 1(32)
PART TWO The Documents 33(107)
1. Defining Rights before 1789
35(36)
Natural Law as Defined by the Encyclopedia 35(3)
Diderot
1. "Natural Law," 1755
35(3)
Religious Toleration 38(13)
Voltaire
2. Treatise on Toleration, 1763
38(2)
3. Edict of Toleration, November 1787
40(4)
4. Letter from Rabaut Saint Etienne on the Edict of Toleration, December 6, 1787
44(4)
Zalking Hourwitz
5. Vindication of the Jews, 1789
48(3)
Antislavery Agitation 51(9)
Abbe Raynal
6. From the Philosophical and Political History of the Settlements and Trade of the Europeans in the East and West Indies, 1770
51(4)
Condorcet
7. Reflections on Negro Slavery, 1781
55(3)
8. Society of the Friends of Blacks, Discourse on the Necessity of Establishing in Paris a Society for...the Abolition of the Slave Trade and of Negro Slavery, 1788
58(2)
Women Begin to Agitate for Rights 60(3)
9. "Petition of Women of the Third Estate to the King," January 1, 1789
60(3)
Categories of Citizenship 63(8)
Abbe Sieyes
10. What Is the Third Estate?, January 1789
63(8)
2. The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, 1789
71(9)
Debates about the Declaration of Rights, July and August 1789 71(6)
11. Marquis de Lafayette, July 11, 1789
71(2)
12. Duke Mathieu de Montmorency, August 1, 1789
73(2)
13. Malouet, August 1, 1789
75(2)
The Declaration 77(3)
14. "Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen," August 26, 1789
77(3)
3. Debates over Citizenship and Rights during the Revolution
80(60)
The Poor and the Propertied 80(4)
Abbe Sieyes
15. Preliminary to the French Constitution, August 1789
81(1)
Thouret
16. Report on the Basis of Political Eligibility, September 29, 1789
82(1)
17. Speech of Robespierre Denouncing the New Conditions of Eligibility, October 22, 1789
83(1)
Religious Minorities and Questionable Professions 84(17)
The First Controversies 84(9)
18. Brunet de Latuque, December 21, 1789
84(2)
19. Count de Clermont Tonnerre, December 23, 1789
86(2)
20. Abbe Maury, December 23, 1789
88(2)
21. Letter from French Actors, December 24, 1789
90(1)
22. Prince de Broglie, December 24, 1789
91(2)
The Jewish Question 93(8)
23. Petition of the Jews of Paris, Alsace, and Lorraine to the National Assembly, January 28, 1790
93(4)
24. La Fare, Bishop of Nancy, Opinion on the Admissibility of Jews to Full Civil and Political Rights, Spring 1790
97(2)
25. Admission of Jews to Rights of Citizenship, September 27, 1791
99(2)
Free Blacks and Slaves 101(18)
26. The Abolition of Negro Slavery or Means for Ameliorating Their Lot, 1789
101(2)
27. Motion Made by Vincent Oge the Younger to the Assembly of Colonists, 1789
103(2)
Abbe Gregoire
28. Memoir in Favor of the People of Color or Mixed-Race of Saint Domingue, 1789
105(1)
29. Society of the Friends of Blacks, Address to the National Assembly in Favor of the Abolition of the Slave Trade, February 5, 1790
106(3)
30. Speech of Barnave, March 8, 1790
109(3)
Kersaint
31. Discussion of Troubles in the Colonies, March 28, 1792
112(3)
32. Decree of the National Convention of February 4, 1794, Abolishing Slavery in All the Colonies
115(1)
33. Speech of Chaumette Celebrating the Abolition of Slavery, February 18, 1794
116(3)
Women 119(21)
Condorcet
34. "On the Admission of Women to the Rights of Citizenship," July 1790
119(3)
Etta Palm D'Aelders
35. Discourse on the Injustice of the Laws in Favor of Men, at the Expense of Women, December 30, 1790
122(2)
Olympe de Gouges
36. The Declaration of the Rights of Woman, September 1791
124(5)
Prudhomme
37. "On the Influence of the Revolution on Women," February 12, 1791
129(3)
38. Discussion of Citizenship under the Proposed New Constitution, April 29, 1793
132(3)
39. Discussion of Women's Political Clubs and Their Suppression, October 29-30, 1793
135(3)
Chaumette
40. Speech at the General Council of the City Government of Paris Denouncing Women's Political Activism, November 17, 1793
138(2)
Appendices 140(7)
Chronology 140(2)
Questions for Consideration 142(3)
Selected Bibliography 145(2)
Index 147


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...