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From Cause to Causation : A Peircean Perspective,9781402009778
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From Cause to Causation : A Peircean Perspective

by
ISBN13:

9781402009778

ISBN10:
1402009771
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Springer Verlag

Summary

From Cause to Causation presents both a critical analysis of C.S. Peirce's conception of causation, and a novel approach to causation, based upon the semeiotic of Peirce. The book begins with a review of the history of causation, and with a critical discussion of contemporary theories of the concept of 'cause'. The author uncovers a number of inadequacies in the received views of causation, and discusses their historical roots. He makes a distinction between "causality", which is the relation between cause and effect, and causation, which is the production of a certain effect. He argues that, by focusing on causality, the contemporary theories fatally neglect the more fundamental problem of causation. The author successively discusses Peirce's theories of final causation, natural classes, semeiotic, and semeiotic causation. Finally, he uses Peirce's semeiotic to develop a new approach to causation, which relates causation to our experience of signs. The book will interest philosophers interested in the problem of causation, the philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, process philosophy, and semiotics.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements ix
Note on References xi
Preface xiii
Some Key Moments in the History of the Concept of Causation
1(46)
Causation in Ancient Greece
2(6)
Aristotle: Four Types of Explanation
2(3)
The Stoics: Causation, Exceptionless Regularity, and Necessity
5(3)
Causation in the Middle Ages
8(7)
Thomas Aquinas
8(7)
Causation in Modern Philosophy
15(26)
The Metaphysical Systems from Descartes till Leibniz
17(10)
Critical Philosophy from Locke till Mill
27(14)
Conclusion: Important Changes in the Meaning of Cause
41(6)
Contemporary Approaches to Causation
47(28)
The Contemporary Debate
47(17)
Necessary and/or Sufficient Conditions
47(7)
Causes and Counterfactual Dependency
54(2)
The Instrumental Approach: Causes as Means-to-Ends
56(2)
Probabilistic Causation
58(2)
The Singularist Approach
60(4)
Basic Issues in the Contemporary Approaches to Causation
64(9)
Five Fundamental Requirements
64(3)
The Relata of the Causal Relation
67(4)
Further Issues
71(2)
Conclusion
73(2)
Peirce on Final Causation
75(22)
Introduction
75(1)
Peirce's Conception of Final Causation
76(12)
The Nature of Final Causation
76(4)
Final Causation and Efficient Causation
80(2)
Teleological and Mechanistic Processes; Peirce's Rejection of Dualism
82(2)
Teleology and Objective Chance
84(1)
Teleology as Creative; Developmental Teleology
85(3)
A Peircean Critique of Ernst Mayr's Theory of Teleology
88(7)
The Goal of Evolution
88(3)
Mayr's Dualism
91(2)
Mayr's Idea of a Program as `Causally Responsible' for Teleological Processes
93(2)
Conclusion
95(2)
Final Causes and Natural Classes
97(36)
Natural Kinds and Causation in Contemporary Philosophy
99(2)
Some Contemporary Interpretations of Peircean Natural Kinds
101(3)
Susan Haack's Interpretation
101(1)
Christopher Hookway's Interpretation
102(1)
Sandra Rosenthal's Interpretation
103(1)
Peirce versus Mill
104(5)
Mill's Theory of Natural Kinds
104(1)
Natural Kinds and the Uniformity of Nature; Peirce's Earliest Discussion of Natural Kinds
105(2)
Peirce's Baldwin Definition of Kind
107(1)
The PRE-Character
108(1)
Kinds and Classes
109(3)
Classification According to Final Causes
112(4)
Criteria of Demarcation
116(3)
Recapitulation: Definition of Peircean Natural Classes
119(2)
Why Believe in Natural Classes?
121(1)
Examples of Natural Classes
122(5)
Examples from the Realm of Human Experience: Social Classes, the Sciences, and Man-Made Objects
122(1)
The Chemical Elements
123(3)
The Biological Species
126(1)
Was Peirce a Pluralist Regarding Natural Classes?
127(4)
Conclusion: Natural Classes and Causation
131(2)
The Riddle of Semeiotic Causation
133(34)
Some Fundamental Conditions of Signs as Such
134(5)
Early Basic Insights
134(2)
Later Developments
136(3)
T.L. Short
139(5)
Joseph Ransdell
144(3)
Some Problems Generated by Short's and Ransdell's Views
147(1)
The Causal Role of the Dynamic Object
148(5)
Positive Evidence
148(2)
Negative Evidence
150(3)
Icon, Index, and Symbol
153(7)
The Meaning of `Determines'
160(4)
Conclusion
164(3)
A Semeiotic Account of Causation
167(52)
Criticism of the Received View
167(13)
Contemporary Approaches to Causation
168(2)
Two Mutually Incompatible Conceptions of Cause
170(1)
The Inadequacy of the Received View
171(5)
Two Mutually Incompatible Categoreal Frameworks
176(3)
Conclusion to Part 1: Criticism of the Received View
179(1)
Necessary Conditions for a Theory of Causation
180(1)
Peirce on Causality and Causation
181(14)
Peirce's Critique of the Principle of Causality
181(6)
Peirce's Conception of Causation
187(3)
Causality and Causation: Facts versus Events
190(2)
Events and Processes
192(2)
Conclusion to Part 3: Causality and Causation
194(1)
A Semeiotic Approach to Causation
195(18)
Some Formal Characteristics of Semeiosis
195(2)
The Problem of Semeiotic Causation
197(1)
Semeiosis Provides the Formal Structure of Causation
198(1)
A Semeiotic Approach to Causation
199(14)
Conclusion: a Peircean Approach to Causation
213(6)
Notes 219(14)
Bibliography 233(10)
Index 243


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