9780195004625

From Max Weber Essays in Sociology

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780195004625

  • ISBN10:

    0195004620

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 12/31/1958
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

Introducing the student to the work of a great sociologist, this book opens with a comprehensive biographical essay on Weber's life and work and includes his essays on science and politics, power, religion, and social structures.

Table of Contents

PREFACE v
INTRODUCTION: THE MAN AND HIS WORK
I. A Biographical View
3(29)
II. Political Concerns
32(13)
III. Intellectual Orientations
45(32)
1. Marx and Weber
46(5)
2. Bureaucracy and Charisma: a Philosophy of History
51(4)
3. Methods of Social Science
55(6)
4. The Sociology of Ideas and Interests
61(4)
5. Social Structures and Types of Capitalism
65(5)
6. Conditions of Freedom and the Image of Man
70(7)
PART I: SCIENCE AND POLITICS 77(82)
IV. Politics as a Vocation
77(52)
V. Science as a Vocation
129(30)
PART II: POWER 159(108)
VI. Structures of Power
159(21)
1. The Prestige and Power of the `Great Powers'
159(3)
2. The Economic Foundations of `Imperialism'
162(9)
3. The Nation
171(9)
VII. Class, Status, Party
180(16)
1. Economically Determined Power and the Social Order
180(1)
2. Determination of Class-Situation by Market-Situation
181(2)
3. Communal Action Flowing from Class Interest
183(1)
4. Types of `Class Struggle'
184(2)
5. Status Honor
186(1)
6. Guarantees of Status Stratification
187(1)
7. `Ethnic' Segregation and `Caste'
188(2)
8. Status Privileges
190(2)
9. Economic Conditions and Effects of Status Stratification
192(2)
10. Parties
194(2)
VIII. Bureaucracy
196(49)
1. Characteristics of Bureaucracy
196(2)
2. The Position of the Official
198(6)
3. The Presuppositions and Causes of Bureaucracy
204(5)
4. The Quantitative Development of Administrative Tasks
209(3)
5. Qualitative Changes of Administrative Tasks
212(2)
6. Technical Advantages of Bureaucratic Organization
214(2)
7. Bureaucracy and Law
216(5)
8. The Concentration of the Means of Administration
221(3)
9. The Leveling of Social Differences
224(4)
10. The Permanent Character of the Bureaucratic Machine
228(2)
11. Economic and Social Consequences of Bureaucracy
230(2)
12. The Power Position of Bureaucracy
232(3)
13. Stages in the Development of Bureaucracy
235(5)
14. The `Rationalization' of Education and Training
240(5)
IX. The Sociology of Charismatic Authority
245(8)
1. The General Character of Charisma
245(3)
2. Foundations and Instability of Charismatic Authority
248(3)
3. Charismatic Kingship
251(2)
X. The Meaning of Discipline
253(14)
1. The Origins of Discipline in War
255(6)
2. The Discipline of Large-Scale Economic Organizations
261(1)
3. Discipline and Charisma
262(5)
PART III: RELIGION 267(96)
XI. The Social Psychology of the World Religions
267(35)
XII. The Protestant Sects and the Spirit of Capitalism
302(21)
XIII. Religious Rejections of the World and Their Directions
323(40)
1. Motives for the Rejection of the World: the Meaning of Their Rational Construction
323(1)
2. Typology of Asceticism and of Mysticism
324(3)
3. Directions of the Abnegation of the World
327(4)
4. The Economic Sphere
331(2)
5. The Political Sphere
333(7)
6. The Esthetic Sphere
340(3)
7. The Erotic Sphere
343(7)
8. The Intellectual Sphere
350(8)
9. The Three Forms of Theodicy
358(5)
PART IV: SOCIAL STRUCTURES 363(82)
XIV. Capitalism and Rural Society in Germany
363(23)
XV. National Character and the Junkers
386(10)
XVI. India: The Brahman and the Castes
396(20)
1. Caste and Tribe
398(1)
2. Caste and Guild
399(6)
3. Caste and Status Group
405(4)
4. The Social Rank Order of the Castes in General
409(2)
5. Castes and Traditionalism
411(5)
XVII. The Chinese Literati
416(29)
1. Confucius
421(1)
2. The Development of the Examination System
422(4)
3. The Typological Position of Confucian Education
426(8)
4. The Status-Honor of the Literati
434(2)
5. The Gentleman Ideal
436(2)
6. The Prestige of Officialdom
438(2)
7. Views on Economic Policy
440(2)
8. Sultanism and the Eunuchs as Political Opponents of the Literati
442(3)
NOTES 445(24)
INDEX 469

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