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Fundamentals of Case Management Practice : Exercises and Readings,9780534355944

Fundamentals of Case Management Practice : Exercises and Readings

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780534355944

ISBN10:
0534355943
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
9/5/2000
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole
List Price: $59.00
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Summary

This practical, "how-to" workbook is designed to prepare students to walk away from the classroom into a social service setting and be able to function competently in the most basic skills, decisions, and discussions. Nancy Summers presents a step-by-step case management procedure that takes students from intake to termination by providing clear directions for each step in the process, practical "how to" tips, and using practice scenarios taken from real case management situations. The workbook includes actual agency forms providing students with the opportunity to practice using forms similar to those they will use in agencies.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Section One Foundations for Best Practice in Case Management 1(70)
Ethics and Other Professional Responsibilities for Human Service Workers
3(43)
Introduction
3(1)
Dual Relationships
3(4)
Sexual or Romantic Relationships
5(2)
Value Conflicts
7(1)
Avoiding Value Conflicts
8(1)
Clients' Rights
8(6)
Informed Consent
10(1)
Confidentiality
11(2)
Privacy
13(1)
Accessing the File
14(1)
Self-Determination
14(1)
Privileged Communication
14(1)
When You Can Give Information
15(2)
The Intention to Harm Another
15(1)
Mandated Reporting
16(1)
Diagnostic Labeling
17(1)
Involuntary Commitment
17(1)
Ethical Responsibility
18(1)
Burdening the Client with Your Problems
18(1)
Meeting Your Needs
18(1)
Insisting on Your Solutions
18(1)
Exploiting Dependency
19(1)
Competence
19(1)
Professional Responsibility
19(1)
Summary
20(1)
Ethics Exercise
20(2)
Ethically, What Went Wrong?
22(3)
Ethical Standards of Human Service Professionals
25(4)
Preamble
25(1)
The Human Service Professional's Responsibility to Clients
26(1)
The Human Service Professional's Responsibility to the Community and Society
26(1)
The Human Service Professional's Responsibility to Colleagues
27(1)
The Human Service Professional's Responsibility to the Profession
28(1)
The Human Service Professional's Responsibility to Employers
28(1)
The Human Service Professional's Responsibility to Self
28(1)
NASW Code of Ethics
29(17)
Overview
29(1)
Preamble
29(1)
Purpose of the NASW Code of Ethics
30(1)
Ethical Principles
31(2)
Ethical Standards
33(13)
Case Management: Definition and Responsibilities
46(13)
Introduction
46(1)
Why Case Management?
47(1)
What Is an Individualized Plan?
47(1)
Assessment
48(1)
Planning
48(2)
Formal Agencies
49(1)
Generic Resources
49(1)
Informal Resources and Folk Support Systems
49(1)
Continued Planning
50(1)
Linking
50(1)
Monitoring
51(1)
Skills You Need to Know to Do Case Management
52(1)
Some Useful Guidelines
52(1)
Skills You Need to Be an Effective Case Manager
53(1)
Levels of Case Management
53(1)
Administrative Case Management
53(1)
Resource Coordination
54(1)
Intensive Case Management
54(1)
Separating Case Management from Therapy
54(1)
Exercises in Case Management
55(4)
Applying the Ecological Model: A Theoretical Foundation for Human Services
59(12)
Introduction
59(1)
Seeking a Balanced View of the Client
60(2)
The Three Levels
62(1)
Looking at What the Person Brings
62(1)
Looking at What the Context Brings
62(1)
Developmental Transitions
63(1)
Developing the Interventions
64(1)
Larger Interventions
65(1)
Looking at Florence's Problem on Three Levels
66(1)
Designing Three Levels of Intervention
67(4)
Section Two Useful Clarifications and Attitudes 71(50)
Cultural Competence
73(19)
Introduction
73(1)
Culture and Communication
73(1)
Your Ethical Responsibility
73(1)
When You Are Not Sure
74(1)
Where Are the Differences?
74(1)
Cultures
74(1)
Subcultures
74(1)
Race and Ethnic Group
75(1)
How We Develop a We-Versus-Them Attitude
75(1)
Strangers
75(2)
Anxiety and Uncertainty
77(1)
Thoughtless Versus Thoughtful Communication
78(3)
Recognizing Our Tendency to Categorize
78(1)
Looking for Exceptions
78(1)
Checking Our Attributions
78(1)
Evaluating Scripts
79(1)
Checking Perceptions
80(1)
Allowing Differences
80(1)
Dimensions of Culture
81(5)
Individualistic and Collectivistic Cultures
81(1)
How Individualistic and Collectivistic Cultures Differ
81(5)
Obstacles to Understanding
86(2)
Stereotypes
86(1)
Ethnocentrism
86(1)
Prejudice
86(1)
Conflict
87(1)
Changing Attitudes
87(1)
Competence
88(1)
Testing Your Cultural Competence
88(4)
Examining Attitudes and Perceptions
92(16)
Introduction
92(1)
Basic Helping Attitudes
92(4)
Warmth
93(1)
Genuineness
93(1)
Empathy
94(1)
Minor Problems
94(1)
Major Problems
94(1)
On Being Judgmental
95(1)
Discouragement
96(1)
Ways to Motivate and Encourage
97(2)
Begin Where the Client Is
97(1)
See the Client's Strengths
97(1)
Accurately Assess the Client's Reluctance
97(1)
Collaborate
98(1)
Appreciate Every Effort
98(1)
Never Lose Sight of Potential
98(1)
Encouragement Rules
98(1)
How Clients Are Discouraged
99(3)
Demonstrating Warmth, Genuineness, and Empathy
102(4)
Vignette #1
103(1)
Vignette #2
104(1)
Vignette #3
104(1)
Vignette #4
105(1)
Recognizing the Difference: Encouragement or Discouragement
106(2)
Seeing Yourself as a Separate Person
108(5)
Introduction
108(1)
Seeing Yourself and the Client as Completely Separate Individuals
108(1)
The Client Reminds You of You
108(1)
The Client Reflects on You
109(1)
Poor Assumptions
109(1)
Summary
110(1)
Blurred Boundaries
110(3)
Clarifying Who Owns the Problems
113(8)
Introduction
113(1)
If the Client Owns the Problem
114(2)
It Is Not Uncaring
115(1)
It Is a Strategic Decision
115(1)
Be a Resource and a Collaborator
116(1)
If You Own the Problem
116(1)
If You Both Own the Problem
117(1)
Who Owns the Problem?
118(1)
Making the Strategic Decision
119(2)
Section Three Effective Communication 121(78)
Identifying Good Responses and Poor Responses
123(11)
Introduction
123(1)
The Twelve Roadblocks to Communication
123(4)
Ordering, Directing, Commanding
124(1)
Warning, Admonishing, Threatening
124(1)
Exhorting, Moralizing, Preaching
124(1)
Advising, Giving Solutions or Suggestions
124(1)
Lecturing, Teaching, Giving Logical Arguments
125(1)
Judging, Criticizing, Disagreeing, Blaming
125(1)
Praising, Agreeing
125(1)
Name-calling, Ridiculing, Shaming
126(1)
Interpreting, Analyzing, Diagnosing
126(1)
Reassuring, Sympathizing, Consoling, Supporting
126(1)
Probing, Questioning, Interrogating
126(1)
Withdrawing, Distracting, Humoring, Diverting
127(1)
Identifying Roadblocks
127(1)
Useful Responses
128(5)
Ways to Start Responding to Feelings
129(1)
Ways to Start Responding to Content
129(1)
Ways to Start a Closed Question
129(1)
Ways to Start an Open Question
130(1)
Ways to Start an ``I Message''
130(1)
Useful Ways to Begin a Firmer I Message
130(1)
Ways to Show Appreciation for What Has Been Said
131(1)
Specific Questions Useful in Beginning to Disarm Anger
131(1)
Examples of Ways to Agree When Practicing Disarming
131(1)
Sample Response When You Cannot Change
131(1)
Sample Response When You Find You Can Compromise
132(1)
Ways to Start Collaboration
132(1)
Ways to Involve the Client in Collaboration
132(1)
Conclusion
133(1)
Listening and Responding
134(20)
Introduction
134(1)
Defining Active Listening
134(1)
Responding to Feelings
135(3)
Responding to Content
138(1)
Positive Reasons for Active Listening
139(1)
Self-acceptance
139(1)
Drain Off Feeling
140(1)
Points to Remember
140(1)
Active Listen Long Enough
140(1)
Solutions Come Later
140(1)
Active Listening Does Not Mean You Agree
141(1)
You Could Be Wrong
141(1)
Mind Your Body Language
141(1)
How Many Feelings Can You Name?
141(1)
Finding the Right Feeling
142(2)
Active Listening Exercises
144(10)
Active Listening I
144(2)
Active Listening II
146(2)
Active Listening III
148(2)
Active Listening IV
150(2)
Active Listening V
152(2)
Asking Questions
154(12)
Introduction
154(1)
When Questions Are Important
154(1)
Closed Questions
155(1)
Open Questions
155(1)
Questions That Make the Client Feel Uncomfortable
156(2)
Avoid the Use of ``Why'' Questions
156(1)
Do Not Ask Multiple Questions
156(1)
Do Not Change the Subject
157(1)
Do Not Imply There Is Only One Answer to Your Question
157(1)
Do Not Inflict Your Values on the Client
157(1)
Do Not Ask Questions That Make Assumptions
157(1)
A Formula for Asking Open Questions
158(1)
What Is Wrong with These Questions?
158(2)
Which Question is Better?
160(2)
Exercises in Opening Closed Questions
162(4)
Opening Closed Questions I
162(1)
Opening Closed Questions II
163(1)
Try Asking Questions
164(2)
Bringing up Difficult Issues
166(13)
Introduction
166(1)
When to Use Confrontation
166(2)
Discrepancies
166(1)
Other Reasons to Use Confrontation
167(1)
The ``I Message'' in Confrontation
168(1)
The Rules for Confrontation
169(3)
Be Matter-of-fact
169(1)
Be Tentative
169(1)
Focus on Tangible Behavior or Communication, What You Can Observe
169(1)
Take Full Responsibility for Your Observations
170(1)
Always Collaborate
170(1)
Do Not Accuse the Other Person
170(1)
Do Not Confront Because You Are Angry
171(1)
Do Not Be Judgmental
171(1)
Do Not Give the Client a Solution
171(1)
Confronting Collaterals
172(1)
On Not Becoming Overbearing
172(1)
What Is Wrong Here?
173(2)
Expressing Your Concern Exercises
175(2)
Expressing Your Concern I
175(1)
Expressing Your Concern II
176(1)
Expressing a Stronger Message
177(2)
Addressing and Disarming Anger
179(12)
Introduction
179(1)
Common Reasons for Anger
179(1)
Why Disarming Anger Is Important
180(1)
Avoiding the Number One Mistake
181(1)
The Four-Step Process
182(1)
What You Do Not Want to Do
183(2)
Do Not Become Defensive
183(1)
Do Not Become Sarcastic or Facetious
184(1)
Do Not Be Superior
184(1)
Do Not Grill the Client
184(1)
Look For Useful Information
185(1)
Managing an Angry Outburst
185(1)
Initial Responses to Anger
186(2)
Practicing Disarming
188(3)
Putting It All Together
191(8)
Introduction
191(8)
Exercise I
191(2)
Exercise II
193(3)
Exercise III
196(2)
Exercise IV
198(1)
Section Four Meeting Clients and Assessing Their Strengths and Needs 199(56)
Documenting Initial Inquiries
201(7)
Introduction
201(1)
Steps for Filling Out the Form
201(1)
Capturing the Highlights of the Chief Complaint
202(1)
Evaluate the Client's Motivation and Mood
203(1)
Complete the Form
204(1)
Sending a Verification
204(2)
Intake Exercises
206(2)
Exercise One Intake of a Middle-Aged Adult
206(1)
Exercise Two Intake of a Child
207(1)
Exercise Three Intake of an Infirm, Older Person
207(1)
The First Interview
208(9)
Introduction
208(1)
Your Role
208(1)
The Client's Understanding
209(1)
Preparing for the First Interview
209(1)
Your Office
210(1)
Meeting the Client
210(1)
Taking Notes
211(1)
Collecting Information
211(1)
Asking for More Clarification
212(1)
What Information to Collect
212(1)
Client Expectations
213(1)
Using an Assessment Form
213(1)
Wrapping Up
213(1)
The Client Leaves
214(1)
The Next Step
214(1)
First Interview Exercises
215(2)
Exercise One Assessment of a Middle-Aged Adult
215(1)
Exercise Two Assessment of a Child
215(1)
Exercise Three Intake of an Infirm, Older Person
215(1)
Exercise Four Creating a File
216(1)
Using DSM-IV
217(14)
Introduction
217(1)
Is DSM-IV Only a Mental Health Tool?
217(1)
Cautions
218(1)
Who Makes the Diagnosis?
218(1)
Background Information
218(3)
Psychiatry Attempts to Classify Mental Disorders
218(1)
The 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s
219(1)
Psychiatry Becomes More Medical
220(1)
How We Got to DSM-IV
221(1)
Using the DSM-IV
221(4)
What You Will Find in DSM-IV
221(1)
Making the Diagnosis
222(1)
A Closer Look at Multiaxial Assessment
222(3)
Making the Code
225(3)
Subtypes
225(1)
Modifiers
226(1)
Modifiers for Past and Present
226(1)
Modifiers for Course and Severity
226(1)
Reason-for-Visit Modifiers
226(1)
Provisional Diagnoses
226(1)
Not Otherwise Specified
227(1)
V Codes
227(1)
Unspecified
227(1)
Deferred
227(1)
Conclusion
228(1)
Exercises on Using DSM-IV
228(3)
The Mental Status Exam
231(19)
Introduction
231(1)
What to Observe
231(1)
How to Observe
232(1)
Documentation
232(1)
Describing the Client
232(1)
Mental Status Outline
232(2)
Terms and Expressions Used for Intake, Evaluations, Assessments, and Referrals
234(14)
General Description
235(4)
Emotions
239(1)
Cognitive Functioning
240(3)
Thought and Perception
243(3)
Suicidality, Homocidality, and Impulse Control
246(1)
Insight and Judgment
246(1)
Reliability (Accuracy of the Client's Report)
247(1)
The Environment
247(1)
Exercises Using the MSE Vocabulary
248(2)
Receiving and Releasing Information
250(5)
Sending for Information
250(1)
If You Release Information
250(1)
Directions for Using the Release Form
251(1)
Example of a Release Form
251(2)
When the Material Is Received
253(1)
Release of Information Exercises
253(2)
Exercise One Intake of a Middle-Aged Adult
253(1)
Exercise Two Intake of a Child
253(1)
Exercise Three Intake of a Frail, Older Person
253(1)
Exercise Four Maintaining Your Charts
253(2)
Section Five Developing a Plan with the Client 255(22)
Developing a Service Plan
257(8)
Introduction
257(1)
Using the Assessment
257(1)
Creating the Treatment or Goal Plan
258(1)
Involving the Client and the Family
259(1)
Individualized Planning
260(1)
Understanding Barriers
261(1)
Sample Goal Plan
261(2)
Broad Goal Planning Exercises
263(2)
Exercise One Planning for a Middle-Aged Adult
263(1)
Exercise Two Planning for a Child
264(1)
Exercise Three Planning for an Infirm, Older Person
264(1)
Exercise Four Maintaining Your Charts
264(1)
Exercise Five Checking Services
264(1)
Preparing for Service Planning Conference or Disposition Planning Meeting
265(5)
Introduction
265(1)
What You Will Need to Bring to the Meeting
265(1)
Goal One for the Meeting: Diagnosis
266(1)
Goal Two for the Meeting: Level of Case Management
266(1)
Goal Three for the Meeting: Services
266(1)
Preparing to Present Your Case
267(1)
Making the Presentation
268(1)
Collaboration
268(1)
Conclusion
268(1)
Planning Exercises
269(1)
Exercise One Developing a Service Directory
269(1)
Exercise Two A Simulated Planning Meeting
269(1)
Making the Referral and Assembling the Record
270(7)
Introduction
270(1)
Determing Dates
270(1)
The Target Date
270(1)
The Review Date
271(1)
Sample Referral Form
271(1)
The Face Sheet
271(2)
Exercises to Assemble the Record
273(4)
Section Six Monitoring Services and Following the Client 277(36)
Monitoring the Services or Treatment
279(4)
Introduction
279(1)
Purpose of Monitoring
280(1)
Collaboration
281(1)
What Is Monitoring?
282(1)
Leave the Office
282(1)
Conclusion
282(1)
Documentation and Recording
283(16)
Documenting Client Encounters
283(1)
Writing Contact Notes
283(1)
Labeling the Contact
284(1)
Types of Contacts
284(1)
Documenting Service Monitoring
284(2)
Documentation: The Finishing Touches
286(2)
Hostility
286(1)
Interactions
286(1)
Documenting Significant Aspects of Contact
286(1)
Clarity
286(1)
Quotations
287(1)
Contradictions
287(1)
Language
287(1)
Disabilities
287(1)
Government Requirements
288(1)
Do Not Be Judgmental
289(1)
Know the Difference Between Facts and Impressions
290(1)
Positive and Negative
290(1)
Agreement
290(1)
Changes to the Plan
290(1)
Recording Exercises
291(8)
Exercise One Recording Your Meeting with the Client
291(1)
Exercise Two Recording a Client Contact: Part A
292(3)
Recording a Client Contact: Part B
295(2)
Exercise Three Using Government Guidelines to Correct Errors
297(1)
Exercise Four Spotting Recording Errors
298(1)
Developing Goals and Objectives at the Provider Agency
299(10)
Introduction
299(1)
Expect Positive Outcomes
299(1)
Writing the Goals
300(1)
Objectives
301(1)
How to Identify the Client's Strengths
302(1)
Combining Goals and Treatment Objectives
302(1)
Finishing Touches
303(2)
Proper Endings
303(1)
Numbering System
303(1)
Target Dates
304(1)
Treatment Interventions
304(1)
Long Term and Short Term
304(1)
Client Participation/Collaboration
305(1)
Exercises
305(4)
Terminating the Case
309(4)
Introduction
309(1)
A Successful Termination
310(1)
The Final Interview
310(1)
The Letter
310(1)
Documentation
310(1)
The Discharge Summary
311(1)
Conclusion
311(1)
Termination Exercises
312(1)
Appendix Wildwood Case Management Unit Forms 313(18)
Face Sheet
315(2)
New Referral or Inquiry
317(2)
Verification of Appointment
319(2)
Release of Information
321(2)
Treatment or Goal Plan
323(2)
Referral
325(2)
Contact Notes
327(4)
References and Reading List 331(2)
Index 333


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