9781405135450

Fundamentals of Conservation Biology, 3rd Edition

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781405135450

  • ISBN10:

    140513545X

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 10/1/2006
  • Publisher: Wiley

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Summary

The conservation of biodiversity is one of the most important issues facing the world today. In the new edition of this highly successful book, Malcolm Hunter and new coauthor James Gibbs offer a thorough introduction to the fascinating and important field of conservation biology, focusing on what can be done to maintain biodiversity through management of ecosystems and populations. Starting with a succinct look at conservation and biodiversity, this book goes on to contend with some of the subjectrs"s most complex topics, such as mass extinctions, ecosystem degradation, and over exploitation. Discussions of the social, political, and economic aspects of conservation biology issues are both interwoven throughout the text and addressed independently in their own chapters. This new edition has been thoroughly revised with more than 750 new references, web links to many of the organizations involved in conservation biology, and striking full-color figures, photographs, and maps. Hunter and Gibbs have created a context in which the principles of conservation biology can be readily understood and applied to managing real world populations and ecosystems.

Author Biography

Malcolm Hunter is the Libra Professor of Conservation Biology and Professor of Wildlife Ecology at the University of Maine, Orono. He is also the former President of the Society for Conservation Biology.

James Gibbs is Associate Professor of Environmental and Forest Biology at the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Table of Contents

List of Case Studies
xi
Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xvi
PART I Biodiversity and Its Importance
3(110)
Conservation and Conservation Biology
4(18)
What Is Conservation?
4(1)
A Brief History of Conservation
5(5)
An Overview of Conservation Ethics
10(4)
What Is Conservation Biology?
14(1)
A Brief History of a Young Discipline
15(5)
Summary
20(2)
What Is Biodiversity?
22(12)
Species, Genes, and Ecosystems
22(2)
Structure and Function
24(1)
Measuring Biodiversity
24(2)
The Mismeasure of Biodiversity
26(1)
Biodiversity and Spatial Scales
26(3)
Biodiversity Verbs
29(1)
The Related Concepts of ``Integrity'' and ``Sustainability''
29(4)
Summary
33(1)
Species Diversity
34(31)
What Is a Species?
34(2)
How Many Species Are There?
36(4)
The Intrinsic Value of Species and Their Conservation Status
40(5)
The Instrumental Values of Species
45(15)
The Uniqueness Value of Species
60(3)
Summary
63(2)
Ecosystem Diversity
65(21)
What Is an Ecosystem?
65(5)
The Values of Ecosystems
70(7)
Ecosystem Diversity and Species Diversity
77(3)
Ecosystems and Landscapes
80(4)
Summary
84(2)
Genetic Diversity
86(27)
What Is Genetic Diversity?
86(6)
The Importance of Genetic Diversity
92(7)
Processes that Diminish Genetic Diversity
99(7)
Cultural Diversity
106(1)
Summary
106(7)
PART II Threats to Biodiversity
113(112)
Mass Extinctions and Global Change
114(16)
Extinction Episodes of the Past
114(4)
Estimating the Current Rate of Extinction
118(3)
The Prospect of Global Climate Change
121(7)
Summary
128(2)
Extinction Processes
130(20)
Why Are Some Species More Vulnerable to Extinction than Others?
130(5)
Populations
135(4)
Population Viability Analysis
139(9)
Summary
148(2)
Ecosystem Degradation and Loss
150(34)
Contamination
152(6)
Roads, Dams, and Other Structures
158(4)
Earth, Fire, Water
162(3)
Deforestation
165(3)
Desertification
168(2)
Draining, Dredging Damming, etc.
170(4)
Fragmentation
174(8)
Summary
182(2)
Overexploitation
184(21)
The Long History of Overexploitation
184(4)
Types of Exploitation
188(6)
Consequences of Overexploitation
194(3)
Some Final Perspectives on Exploitation
197(6)
Summary
203(2)
Invasive Exotics
205(20)
How Do Species Move?
206(6)
Impacts of Invasive Exotics
212(5)
Success Rates
217(1)
Irony
218(4)
Summary
222(3)
PART III Maintaining Biodiversity
225(104)
Protecting Ecosystems
226(26)
Reserve Selection
228(7)
Reserve Design
235(8)
Reserve Management
243(4)
Summary
247(5)
Managing Ecosystems
252(29)
Modified Ecosystems
252(9)
Cultivated Ecosystems
261(6)
Built Ecosystems
267(3)
Restoring Ecosystems
270(9)
Summary
279(2)
Managing Populations
281(29)
Providing Resources
282(5)
Controlling Threats
287(11)
Direct Manipulations
298(10)
Epilogue
308(1)
Summary
308(2)
Zoos and Gardens
310(19)
Changing Roles
310(2)
Building Arks
312(7)
The ex Situ--in Situ Interface
319(3)
Conservation of Domesticated Species
322(3)
Summary
325(4)
PART IV The Human Factors
329(63)
Social Factors
330(16)
Values Differ
330(6)
Describing Values
336(2)
Values Change
338(6)
Summary
344(2)
Economics
346(26)
The Benefits
346(9)
The Costs
355(1)
The Distribution of Benefits and Costs
356(2)
Problems and Solutions
358(12)
Summary
370(2)
Politics and Action
372(20)
Setting Priorities for Action
372(7)
Rights and Responsibilities
379(1)
International Agencies
379(5)
Governments
384(1)
Nongovernmental Organizations
385(1)
Corporations
386(1)
Communities
387(1)
Individuals
388(2)
Summary
390(2)
Epilogue 392(2)
Glossary 394(11)
Literature Cited and Author Index 405(71)
Species Index 476(10)
Subject Index 486

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