9780824741297

Gear Noise and Vibration

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780824741297

  • ISBN10:

    0824741293

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2003-04-08
  • Publisher: CRC Press

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Summary

Based on over 40 years of consultation and teaching experience, Gear Noise and Vibration demonstrates logical gear noise and vibration approaches without the use of complex mathematics or lengthy computation methods. The Second Edition offers new and extended discussions on high- and low-contact ratio gears, lightly loaded gears, planetary and split drives, and transmission error (T.E.) measurement. A straightforward source for enhanced gear design, assessment, and development practices, the book is enriched with more than 150 figures. It offers the most economic solutions to gear design obstacles and details current challenges and troubleshooting schemes for improved gear installation.

Author Biography

J. Derek Smith is Lecturer and Researcher in the Engineering Department of Cambridge University, England.

Table of Contents

Preface v
Causes of Noise
1(12)
Possible causes of gear noise
1(2)
The basic idea of Transmission Error
3(3)
Gearbox internal responses
6(2)
External responses
8(1)
Overall path to noise
8(1)
T.E.-noise relationship
9(4)
References
11(2)
Harris Mapping for Spur Gears
13(14)
Elastic deflections of gears
13(2)
Reasons for tip relief
15(4)
Unloaded T.E. for spur gears
19(2)
Effect of load on T.E.
21(2)
Long, short or intermediate relief
23(4)
References
25(2)
Theoretical Helical Effects
27(10)
Elastic averaging of T.E.
27(2)
Loading along contact line
29(2)
Axial forces
31(1)
Position variation
31(2)
``Friction reversal'' and ``contact shock'' effects
33(2)
No-load condition
35(2)
References
35(2)
Prediction of Static T.E.
37(24)
Possibilities and problems
37(1)
Thin slice assumptions
38(2)
Tooth shape assumptions
40(4)
Method of approach
44(4)
Program with results
48(5)
Accuracy of estimates and assumptions
53(5)
Design options for low noise
58(3)
References
59(2)
Prediction of Dynamic Effects
61(16)
Modelling of gears in 2-D
61(3)
Time marching approach
64(1)
Starting conditions
65(1)
Dynamic program
66(5)
Stability and step length
71(2)
Accuracy of assumptions
73(2)
Sound predictions
75(2)
References
76(1)
Measurements
77(16)
What to measure
77(2)
Practical measurements
79(5)
Calibrations
84(1)
Measurement of internal resonances
85(2)
Measurement of external resonances
87(1)
Isolator transmission
88(2)
Once per revolution marker
90(3)
References
92(1)
Transmission Error Measurement
93(28)
Original approach
93(2)
Batching approach
95(1)
Velocity approach
96(3)
High speed approach
99(4)
Tangential accelerometers
103(1)
Effect of dynamics
104(2)
Choice of encoders
106(4)
Accuracy of measurement
110(2)
Worms and wheels and spiral bevels
112(1)
Practical problems
113(4)
Comparisons
117(4)
References
119(2)
Recording and Storage
121(18)
Is recording required?
121(1)
Digital v. analog
122(1)
Current PC limits
123(1)
Form of results
124(3)
Aliasing and filters
127(5)
Information compression
132(4)
Archive information
136(3)
References
137(2)
Analysis Techniques
139(28)
Types of noise and irritation
139(1)
Problem identification
140(2)
Frequency analysis techniques
142(6)
Window effects and bandwidth
148(4)
Time averaging and jitter
152(5)
Average or difference
157(1)
Band and line filtering and re-synthesis
158(3)
Modulation
161(2)
Pitch effects
163(2)
Phantoms
165(2)
References
166(1)
Improvements
167(18)
Economics
167(2)
Improving the structure
169(2)
Improving the isolation
171(3)
Reducing the T.E.
174(1)
Permissible T.E. levels
175(3)
Frequency changing
178(1)
Damping
179(2)
Production control options
181(4)
References
183(2)
Lightly Loaded Gears
185(16)
Measurement problems
185(2)
Effects and identification
187(2)
Simple predictions
189(3)
Possible changes
192(1)
Anti-backlash gears
193(1)
Modelling rattle
194(7)
Reference
200(1)
Planetary and Split Drives
201(14)
Design philosophies
201(2)
Advantages and disadvantages
203(2)
Excitation phasing
205(3)
Excitation frequencies
208(1)
T.E. testing
209(1)
Unexpected frequencies
210(5)
Reference
213(2)
High Contact Ratio Gears
215(8)
Reasons for interest
215(1)
Design with Harris maps
216(1)
2 stage relief
217(1)
Comparisons
218(1)
Measurement of T.E.
219(4)
References
222(1)
Low Contact Ratio Gears
223(8)
Advantages
223(4)
Disadvantages
227(1)
Curvature problems
227(2)
Frequency gains
229(2)
Condition Monitoring
231(14)
The problem
231(1)
Not frequency analysis
232(1)
Averaging or not
233(1)
Damage criteria
234(3)
Line elimination
237(1)
Scuffing - Smith Shocks
238(3)
Bearing signals
241(4)
References
243(2)
Vibration Testing
245(18)
Objectives
245(4)
Hydraulic vibrators
249(1)
Hammer measurements
250(4)
Reciprocal theorem
254(1)
Sweep, impulse, noise or chirp
255(2)
Combining results
257(3)
Coherence
260(3)
Couplings
263(6)
Advantages
263(1)
Problems
264(2)
Vibration generation
266(3)
Failures
269(12)
Connection with vibration
269(1)
Pitting
269(1)
Micropitting
270(1)
Cracking
271(1)
Scuffing
272(1)
Bearings
273(3)
Debris detection
276(1)
Couplings
277(1)
Loadings
278(1)
Overheating
279(2)
References
280(1)
Strength v. Noise
281(8)
The connection between strength and noise
281(1)
Design for low noise helicals
282(3)
Design sensitivity
285(1)
Buying problems
286(3)
Units 289(2)
Index 291

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