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Gendered Lives : Communication, Gender, and Culture,9780534571603

Gendered Lives : Communication, Gender, and Culture

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780534571603

ISBN10:
0534571603
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/13/2000
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $61.67

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 4/13/2000.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Summary

Introduces the many ways gender images of masculinity and femininity affect communication and life. Filled with commentaries from students that illustrate how they relate to gender communication issues. More than 90 references. Softcover. DLC: Sex role.

Author Biography

Julia T. Wood is the Lineberger Distinguished Professor of Humanities and Professor of Communication Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Julia T. Wood joined the Department of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill at the age of 24. She is now a professor in that department, where she teaches courses and conducts research on gender, communication, and culture, and on communication in personal relationships. During her career, she has authored 15 books and edited 8 others. In addition, she has published more than 70 articles and book chapters and has presented numerous papers at professional conferences. She has won 8 awards for undergraduate teaching and 8 awards for her scholarship

Table of Contents

Introduction Opening the Conversation 1(1)
The Social Construction of Inequality
2(2)
Feminism--Feminisms
4(2)
Becoming Aware
6(2)
Why I Wrote this Book
8(2)
Communication as the Fulcrum of Change
10(1)
The Challenge of Studying Communication, Gender, and Culture
11(1)
Discussion Questions
12(2)
PART I CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS
The Study of Communication, Gender, and Culture
14(24)
Communication, Gender, and Culture as an Area of Study
15(1)
Knowledge of Gender, Communication, and Culture
15(1)
Student Interest
15(1)
The Value of Studying Communication, Gender, and Culture
15(1)
The Meaning of Gender in a Transitional Era
16(3)
Confusing Attitudes
16(2)
Differences Between Women and Men
18(1)
Relationships Among Gender, Culture, and Communication
19(16)
Gender and Sex
19(1)
Sex
20(2)
Gender
22(6)
Culture
28(2)
Communication
30(1)
Communication is a dynamic process
31(1)
Communication is systemic
31(1)
Communication has two levels of meaning
32(1)
Meanings are created through human interaction with symbols
33(2)
Summary
35(1)
Discussion Questions
36(2)
Theoretical Approaches to Gender Development
38(25)
Theoretical Approaches to Gender
40(21)
Biological Influences on Gender
40(5)
Interpersonal Influences on Gender
45(1)
Psychodynamic theory of gender development
46(2)
Psychological theories of gender development
48(3)
Cultural Influences on Gender
51(1)
Anthropology
52(1)
Symbolic interactionism
53(4)
Standpoint theory
57(4)
Summary
61(1)
Discussion Questions
61(2)
The Rhetorical Shaping of Gender: Women's, Men's, and Gender Movements in America
63(44)
Women's Movements
64(20)
The First Wave of Women's Movements in the United States
65(1)
Women's rights movement
65(2)
The cult of domesticity
67(2)
The Second Wave of Women's Movements in the United States
69(1)
Radical feminism
69(2)
Liberal feminism
71(4)
Separatism
75(1)
Structural feminists
76(1)
Lesbian feminists
77(1)
Revalorists
78(1)
Womanists
79(2)
Power feminism
81(3)
The Third Wave of Women's Movements in the United States
84(4)
Men's Movements
88(12)
Profeminist Men's Movements
88(3)
Promasculinist Men's Movements
91(1)
Free men
92(1)
Mythopoetic men
93(3)
Promise Keepers
96(2)
Million Man March
98(2)
Other Movements Focused on Gender
100(4)
The Backlash
100(2)
Ecofeminism
102(2)
Summary
104(1)
Discussion Questions
105(2)
Gendered Verbal Communication
107(30)
The Nature of Human Communication
108(1)
Verbal Communication Expresses Cultural Views of Gender
108(12)
Language Defines Gender
109(1)
Male generic language excludes women
109(2)
Language defines men and women differently
111(2)
Language names what exists
113(2)
Language Organizes Perceptions of Gender
115(1)
Stereotyping gender
115(1)
Encouraging polarized thinking
116(1)
Language Evaluates Gender
117(1)
Language Enables Hypothetical Thought
118(1)
Language Allows Self-Reflection
119(1)
Language Is a Process
120(1)
Gendered Interaction: Masculine and Feminine Styles of Verbal Communication
120(14)
Gendered Speech Communities
121(1)
The Lessons of Childplay
122(1)
Boys' games
122(1)
Girls' games
123(2)
Gendered Communication Practices
125(1)
Women's speech
125(3)
Men's speech
128(2)
Misinterpretations Between Women and Men
130(1)
Showing support
130(1)
``Troubles talk''
131(1)
The point of the story
132(1)
Relationship talk
133(1)
Public speaking
133(1)
Summary
134(1)
Discussion Questions
135(2)
Gendered Nonverbal Communication
137(26)
Functions of Nonverbal Communication
138(5)
Nonverbal Communication Can Supplement Verbal Communication
138(1)
Nonverbal Communication Can Regulate Interaction
139(1)
Nonverbal Communication Can Establish the Relationship Level of Meaning
139(1)
Responsiveness
139(3)
Liking
142(1)
Power or control
143(1)
Forms of Nonverbal Communication
143(14)
Artifacts
144(2)
Proximity and Personal Space
146(2)
Haptics (Touch)
148(1)
Kinesics (Facial and Body Motion)
149(1)
Paralanguage
150(1)
Physical Characteristics
151(6)
Implications of Gendered Nonverbal Communication
157(3)
The Cultural Context of Nonverbal Communication
157(2)
Respecting Differences in Nonverbal Communication
159(1)
Summary
160(1)
Discussion Questions
161(2)
PART II GENDERED COMMUNICATION IN PRACTICE
Gendered Family Dynamics
163(30)
Entering a Gendered Society
164(1)
Self-as-Object
164(1)
Monitoring
165(1)
Gendering Communication in the Family
165(14)
Unconscious Processes: Identification and Internalization
166(4)
Ego Boundaries
170(2)
Parental Attitudes About Gender
172(1)
Parental Communication About Gender
173(2)
Parental Modeling
175(2)
Different Contributions of Mothers and Fathers
177(2)
The Personal Side of the Gender Drama
179(11)
Growing Up Masculine
179(4)
Growing Up Feminine
183(7)
Summary
190(1)
Discussion Questions
191(2)
Gendered Close Relationships
193(28)
The Meaning of Personal Relationships
194(4)
Defining Personal Relationships
194(1)
Gender and Closeness
195(1)
Male deficit model
195(1)
Alternate paths model
196(2)
Gendered Friendships
198(7)
Commonalities in Women's and Men's Friendships
198(1)
Differences Between Women's and Men's Friendships
198(1)
Women's Friendships: Closeness in Dialogue
199(2)
Men's Friendships: Closeness in the Doing
201(2)
Friendships Between Women and Men
203(2)
Gendered Romantic Relationships
205(13)
Developing Romantic Intimacy
206(2)
Engaging in Committed Relationships
208(1)
Gendered modes of expressing care
208(2)
Gendered preferences for autonomy and connection
210(2)
Gendered responsibility for relational health
212(1)
Gendered power dynamics
212(6)
Summary
218(1)
Discussion Questions
219(2)
Gendered Education: Communication in School Settings
221(22)
The Organization of Schools
223(3)
Schools Perpetuate Gender Inequities
223(1)
Schools Limit Career Aspirations
224(1)
Schools Have Few Female and Minority Role Models
224(2)
Curricular Content
226(4)
Misrepresentation of White Men as Standard
226(1)
The Invisibility of Women
227(2)
Misrepresentation of Human Experiences
229(1)
Educational Processes
230(10)
Unequal Attention to Male and Female Students
230(1)
Not Taking Women Students Seriously
231(1)
Classroom Communication
232(1)
Gender biases in teachers' communication
232(4)
Communication among peers
236(1)
Instructional style
237(3)
Summary
240(1)
Discussion Questions
241(2)
Gendered Organizational Communication
243(36)
Institutional Stereotypes of Women and Men
244(8)
Stereotypes of Women
244(1)
Sex object
244(1)
Mother
245(1)
Child
246(2)
Iron maiden
248(1)
Stereotypes of Men
249(1)
Sturdy oak
249(1)
Fighter
249(1)
Breadwinner
250(2)
Evaluation of Stereotypes
252(1)
Misunderstandings of Professional Communication
252(7)
Male Standards in Institutions
252(2)
Masculine Definitions of Professional Communication
254(2)
Static (or Unchanging) Views of Communication
256(2)
Misperceptions of Men's and Women's Ability to Work Together
258(1)
Gendered Communication Systems in Organizations
259(8)
Leave Policies and Work Schedules
259(1)
Leave policies
259(2)
Work schedules
261(2)
Communication Climates in Organizations
263(1)
Hostile environments for women
263(1)
The informal network
264(1)
Mentor relationships
265(1)
Glass Ceilings--and Walls?
266(1)
Efforts to Redress Gendered Inequity in Institutions
267(8)
Equal Opportunity Laws
268(1)
Affirmative Action Policies
269(2)
Quotas and Goals
271(1)
Quotas
271(1)
Goals
272(2)
Increasing Sensitivity to Gender Issues
274(1)
Summary
275(1)
Discussion Questions
276(3)
Gendered Media: Media's Influence on Gender
279(29)
The Prevalence of Media in Cultural Life
280(1)
Themes in Media
281(13)
Underrepresentation of Women and Minorities
281(2)
Stereotypical Portrayals of Men and Women
283(1)
Stereotypical portrayals of men
283(2)
Stereotypical portrayals of women
285(2)
Stereotypical Images of Relationships Between Men and Women
287(1)
Women's dependence/men's independence
287(2)
Women's incompetence/men's authority
289(1)
Women as primary caregivers/men as breadwinners
290(2)
Women as victims and sex objects/men as aggressors
292(2)
Bias in News Coverage
294(4)
Implications of Media Representations of Gender
298(7)
Fostering Unrealistic and Limited Gender Ideals
298(2)
Pathologizing the Human Body
300(4)
Normalizing Violence Against Women
304(1)
Summary
305(1)
Discussion Questions
306(2)
Gendered Power and Violence
308(31)
The Social Construction of Gendered Violence
309(1)
The Many Faces of Gendered Violence
310(17)
Gender Intimidation
310(1)
Sexual Assault
311(3)
Abuse Between Intimates
314(5)
Sexual Harassment
319(1)
Quid pro quo
320(1)
Hostile environment
320(1)
Whose perspective counts?
321(1)
Genital Mutilation
322(1)
Male circumcision
322(1)
Sunna
322(1)
Excision or clitoridectomy
323(1)
Infibulation
323(3)
Gender-Based Murder
326(1)
Social Foundations of Gendered Violence
327(6)
Normalization of Violence in Media
328(1)
Normalization of Violence by Institutions
329(1)
Family
329(1)
Law enforcement
330(1)
Counseling
331(1)
Language
332(1)
Resisting Gendered Violence: Where Do We Go from Here?
333(3)
Personal Efforts to Reduce Gendered Violence
333(1)
Social Efforts to Reduce Gendered Violence
334(2)
Summary
336(1)
Discussion Questions
337(2)
EPILOGUE Looking Backward, Looking Forward 339(20)
The Cultural Construction and Reconstruction of Gender
340(1)
Looking Backward, Looking Forward
341(11)
Communication
341(1)
Women's communication
341(1)
Men's communication
342(1)
Gender and communication in the future
342(1)
Women's and Men's Movements
342(1)
Liberal feminism
342(1)
The future of feminism
343(1)
Men's movements
343(1)
Gender in Education
344(1)
Reducing gender discrimination
344(1)
Future gender issues in education
344(1)
Gender in Media
345(1)
Changes in women in media
345(1)
Mediated gender in the future
346(1)
Liberal and structural feminist views of women
346(2)
Gender in Personal Relationships
348(1)
Changes in gender relations
348(1)
Addressing gender divisions
348(2)
Gender and Violence
350(1)
Gender in Institutional Settings
351(1)
Women's positions in institutions
351(1)
Valuing diversity in institutional life
352(1)
Social support for families
352(1)
Creating the Future
352(5)
Defining Masculinity and Femininity
353(1)
Responding to Differences
354(1)
Redefining Culture
355(1)
Taking a Voice
356(1)
Discussion Questions
357(2)
Glossary 359(6)
References 365(46)
Index 411


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