9780195154887

Good Americans Italian and Jewish Immigrants During the First World War

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780195154887

  • ISBN10:

    0195154886

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-03-27
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

Among the Americans who joined the ranks of the Doughboys fighting World War I were thousands of America's newest residents. Good Americans examines the contributions of Italian and Jewish immigrants, both on the homefront and overseas, in the Great War. While residing in strong, insular communities, both groups faced a barrage of demands to participate in a conflict that had been raging in their home countries for nearly three years. Italians and Jews "did their bit" in relief, recruitment, conservation, and war bond campaigns, while immigrants and second-generation ethnic soldiers fought on the Western front. Within a year of the Armistice, they found themselves redefined as foreigners and perceived as a major threat to American life, rather than remembered as participants in its defense. Wartime experiences, Christopher Sterba argues, served to deeply politicize first and second generation immigrants, greatly accelerating their transformation from relatively powerless newcomers to a major political force in the United States during the New Deal and beyond.

Author Biography


Christopher M. Sterba received his Ph.D. in American history from Brandeis University and lives in the San Francisco Bay area.

Table of Contents

Introduction The Melting Pot Goes to War 3(6)
The Heyday of the New Immigrant Enclave
9(22)
I Your Country Needs You
31(52)
``Get in Out of the Draft'' Raising Volunteers and the Italian Response in New Haven
34(19)
``Not as a Jew but as a Citizen'' The Draft and New York Jewry
53(30)
II Training the New Immigrant Soldier
83(48)
Being Italian in the Yankee Division
86(19)
Being Jewish in the National Army
105(26)
III The Home Front
131(71)
``More Than Ever, We Feel Proud to Be Italians''
133(20)
``New York Jewry Must Do Its Duty''
153(22)
``They Were Good Americans'' Survival and Victory on the Western Front
175(27)
Epilogue A New Voice in Politics 202(11)
Notes 213(38)
Selected Bibliography 251(14)
Index 265

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