CART

(0) items

Good Reasons,9780205285860

Good Reasons

by ;
ISBN13:

9780205285860

ISBN10:
0205285864
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $34.00
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.99

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Good Reasons : Designing and Writing Effective Arguments
    Good Reasons : Designing and Writing Effective Arguments
  • Good Reasons : Designing and Writing Effective Arguments
    Good Reasons : Designing and Writing Effective Arguments
  • Good Reasons : Researching and Writing Effective Arguments
    Good Reasons : Researching and Writing Effective Arguments
  • Good Reasons : Researching and Writing Effective Arguments
    Good Reasons : Researching and Writing Effective Arguments
  • Good Reasons Researching and Writing Effective Arguments
    Good Reasons Researching and Writing Effective Arguments
  • Good Reasons Researching and Writing Effective Arguments Plus NEW MyCompLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
    Good Reasons Researching and Writing Effective Arguments Plus NEW MyCompLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
  • Good Reasons With Contemporary Arguments
    Good Reasons With Contemporary Arguments
  • Good Reasons: Researching and Writing Effective Arguments, MLA Update
    Good Reasons: Researching and Writing Effective Arguments, MLA Update




Summary

Engaging and accessible to all students, Good Reasons is a brief, very readable introduction to argument by two of the country's foremost rhetoricians. By stressing the rhetorical situation and the audience, this rhetoric avoids complicated schemes and terminology in favor of providing students with the practical means to find good reasons for the positions they want to advocate to their audiences. Supporting the authors' instruction are numerous readings by professional and student writers, including a pivotal selection from Rachel Carson's extraordinarily influential argument, Silent Spring. Good Reasons is distinctive in its emphasis on visual persuasion and the presentation of arguments in various media, including electronic media. It includes a thorough discussion of visual design and how good document design can support good reasons, as well as a unique introduction to arguments on the World Wide Web. Good Reasons is also distinctive in considering narratives as an important aspect of argument.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Part I Persuading with Good Reasons: What Do We Mean by Argument? 1(106)
What to Argue About
5(26)
A Book That Changed the World
5(2)
Why Silent Spring Became a Classic
7(6)
Tactics of Silent Spring
9(3)
Analyzing Arguments: Pathos, Ethos, and Logos
12(1)
Reading Arguments
13(3)
TIPS Reading with a Pencil in Your Hand
14(2)
Finding Arguments
16(2)
Position and Proposal Arguments
16(2)
Rachel Carson, ``The Obligation to Endure''
18(4)
Theo Colborn, Dianne Dumanoski, and John Peterson Myers, ``Hand-Me-Down Poisons''
22(9)
Getting Started: Listing and Analyzing Issues
26(2)
Getting Started: Making an Idea Map
28(3)
Persuading with Good Reasons
31(22)
The Basics of Arguments
31(4)
TIPS What Is Not Arguable
34(1)
The Basics of Reasoning
35(2)
Finding Good Reasons
37(7)
Can You Argue by Definition---from ``the Nature of the Thing''?
38(1)
Can You Argue from Value?
39(1)
Can You Compare or Contrast?
39(1)
Can You Argue from Consequence?
40(2)
Can You Counter Objections to Your Position?
42(1)
Questions for Finding Good Reasons
43(1)
Supporting Good Reasons
44(2)
Deciding Which Good Reasons to Use
46(1)
James Q. Wilson, ``Just Take Away Their Guns''
47(6)
Getting Started on Your Draft
51(2)
Thinking More about Your Audience
53(20)
What Exactly Is an Auidence?
53(1)
Readers Do More than Absorb Information
54(3)
Readers Begin with Purposes
55(1)
Readers Begin with Expectations
56(1)
Readers Compose as They Read
56(1)
Readers React to What They Read
56(1)
Constructing Your Readers
57(1)
Who Will Read Your Argument?
57(2)
What Does Your Audience Already Know---and Not Know?
58(1)
What Are Your Audience's Attitudes toward You?
58(1)
What Are Your Audience's Attitudes toward Your Subject and toward What You Want to Say?
58(1)
Why People Reach Different Conclusions from the Same Evidence
59(7)
Creating Your Readers
66(2)
``Marlboro College'' from the Fiske Guide to Colleges 1993
68(5)
Getting Started: Writing for Particular Audiences
72(1)
The Style of Arguments
73(34)
Facts Alone Do Not Persuade
73(5)
Ethos: Creating an Effective Perrsona
78(4)
Advice on Argument from Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography
82(1)
Choosing an Appropriate Voice
82(7)
TIPS Strong Beginnings
87(2)
Pathos: Appealing to Your Readers' Values
89(2)
TIPS Strong Endings
90(1)
The Language of Arguments
91(4)
Christopher Hitchens, ``Scenes from an Execution''
95(12)
Steps in Writing a Rhetorical Analysis
104(3)
Part II Some Types of Arguments: Options for Arguments 107(100)
Definition Arguments
111(20)
Scott McCloud, ``Setting the Record Straight''
118(8)
Meghann O'Connor (student), ``Cheerleading Is a Competitive Sport''
126(5)
Steps in Writing a Definition Argument
129(2)
Causal Arguments
131(22)
Douglas Rushkoff, ``Channel Surfing''
141(12)
Steps in Writing a Causal Argument
151(2)
Evaluation Arguments
153(16)
Eric Gable and Richard Handler, ``In Colonial Williamsburg, the New History Meets the Old''
160(4)
Natascha Pocek (student), ``The Diet Zone: A Dangerous Place''
164(5)
Steps in Writing an Evaluation Argument
167(2)
Narrative Arguments
169(12)
Leslie Marmon Silko, ``The Border Patrol State''
173(8)
Steps in Writing a Narrative Argument
179(2)
Rebuttal Arguments
181(14)
The Faculty of the University of Washington, ``Open Letter to Governnor Gary Locke and the 2020 Commission on the Future of Higher Education''
188(7)
Steps in Writing a Rebuttal Argument
192(3)
Proposal Arguments
195(12)
Donna Lopiano, ``Title IX: It's Time to Live Up to the Letter of the Law''
200(7)
Steps in Writing a Proposal Argument
204(3)
Part III Effective Arguments: Designing, Documenting, and Revising Arguments 207(108)
Effective Visual Design
209(28)
Understanding Visual Arguments
209(3)
Text
210(1)
Images
211(1)
Graphic Design
211(1)
Print Is a Visual Medium
212(6)
Design Basics
218(8)
Arrangement
220(2)
Consistency
222(2)
Contrast
224(2)
The Rhetoric of Type
226(3)
Graphic Presentation of Information
229(8)
Tables and Charts
229(5)
Misleading Charts
234(1)
Other Graphics
234(3)
Effective Web Design
237(26)
The Basics of the Web
237(3)
A Very Brief History of the Internet and the World Wide Web
239(1)
Arguments on the Web
240(4)
Intranets
244(1)
Putting Text on Your Web Site
244(8)
Web Authoring Software
245(1)
The First Screen Is the Most Important
245(2)
Divide Your Text into Chunks
247(2)
Format So That the Text Is Readable
249(1)
Anticipate Readers' Questions and Objections
250(2)
TIPS Stay Organized
252(1)
Principles of Web Design
252(6)
Determine the Visual Theme of Your Site
253(2)
Know the Messages Your Images Convey
255(1)
Direct the Viewer's Eyes
255(3)
Keep the Visuals Simple
258(1)
Navigational Design
258(2)
Audience Considerations on the Web
260(3)
Online Guides for Publishing on the Web
261(2)
Effective Research
263(22)
Research: Knowing What Information You Need
263(3)
What Makes a Good Subject for Research
266(1)
Planning Your Research
266(3)
Interviews, Observations, and Surveys
267(2)
Finding What You Are Looking for in Print Sources
269(3)
Scholarly, Trade, and Popular Journals
271(1)
Finding What You Are Looking for in Electronic Sources
272(7)
Using Search Engines
272(1)
TIPS Using Search Engines
273(1)
Searching by Key Word
274(2)
Searching by Subject
276(2)
Doing the Research for an Argument about Cloning
278(1)
Evaluating Sources
279(3)
Traditional Criteria for Evaluating Print Sources
280(1)
Additional Criteria for Evaluating Web Sources
281(1)
Taking Notes
282(3)
Effective Documentation
285(24)
Intellectual Property and Scholastic Honesty
285(6)
What Plagiarism Is
286(3)
Using Sources Effectively
289(2)
MLA Documentation
291(5)
Books
292(1)
Periodicals
293(1)
Online Sources
294(2)
Other Sources
296(1)
Sample Argument Paper Using Sources
296(1)
Chris Thomas (student), ``Should Race Be a Qualification to Attend College?''
297(12)
Effective Revision
309(6)
Switch from Writer to Reader
309(1)
Focus on Your Argument
310(2)
Focus on Your Style and Proofread Carefully
312(3)
Appendix A: Working Effectively in Groups 315(4)
Appendix B: APA Documentation 319(6)
Index 325


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...