9780226271101

Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780226271101

  • ISBN10:

    0226271102

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1961-12-15
  • Publisher: Univ of Chicago Pr

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Summary

This work was created by Friedrich Blass, professor of classical philology at the University of Halle-Wittenberg, and was continued after his death by Albert Debrunner, professor of Indo-European and classical philology at the University of Bern until his retirement in 1954. The grammar has passed through ten editions from 1896 to 1960. Robert W. Funk, in translating this long-established classic, has also revised it and, in doing so, has incorporated the notes which Professor Debrunner had prepared for a new German edition on which he was working at the time of his death in 1958. Dr. Funk has also had the co-operation of leading British, Continental, and American scholars. The translation places in the hands of English-speaking students a book that belongs in their libraries and in the libraries of every theologian, philologist and pastor alongside the Gingrich-Danker Greek-English Lexicon. This grammar sets the Greek of the New Testament in the context of Hellenistic Greek and compares and contrasts it with the classical norms. It relates to the New Testament language to its Semitic background, to Greek dialects, and to Latin and has been kept fully abreast of latest developments and manuscript discoveries. It is at no point exclusively dependent on modern editions of the Greek New Testament text but considers variant readings wherever they are significant. It is designed to compress the greatest amount of information into the smallest amount of space consistent with clarity. There are subsections discussing difficult or disputed points and copious citations of primary texts in addition to generous bibliographies for those who wish to pursue specific items further.

Author Biography

Elizabeth A. Kaye specializes in communications as part of her coaching and consulting practice. She has edited Requirements for Certification since the 2000-01 edition.


Table of Contents

From the Preface to the Fourth Edition ix
Preface to the English Edition xi
Tables of Abbreviations
Primary Texts
The New Testament, the Apostolic Fathers, and the Other Early Christian Literature xvii
The Septuagint xviii
Greek and Latin Texts and Authors xix
Papyri and Inscriptions xxiii
Literature
Modern Literature xxv
Periodicals xxxiii
General and Special Abbreviations
General Abbreviations xxxvi
Special Abbreviations xxxvii
Introduction
`New Testament Greek'
1(1)
The Koine
1(1)
The Place of the NT within Hellenistic Greek
2(5)
Part I. PHONOLOGY
On Orthography
7(4)
Phonetics in Composition
11(2)
Major Vowel Changes
13(2)
Other Sound Changes
15(5)
On the Transliteration of Foreign Words
20(5)
Part II. ACCIDENCE AND WORD-FORMATION
Declension
25(11)
First Declension
25(1)
Second Declension
25(1)
Contracted Forms of the First and Second Declensions
25(1)
Third Declension
26(2)
Metaplasm (Fluctuation of Declension)
28(1)
Declension of Foreign Words
29(3)
Adjectives: New Feminines and Comparison
32(2)
Numerals
34(1)
Pronouns
35(1)
Conjugation
36(19)
Introduction
36(1)
Augment and Reduplication
36(2)
-ω Verbs
38(8)
-MI Verbs
46(4)
Supplement: Catalogue of Verbs
50(5)
Adverbs
55(2)
Particles
57(1)
Word-Formation
58(10)
Word-Formation by Suffixes
58(4)
Word-Formation by Composition
62(5)
The Formation of Personal Names
67(1)
Vocabulary
68(2)
Part III. SYNTAX
Subject and Predicate
70(2)
Omission of the Verb &epsis;ιναι
70(2)
Omission of the Subject
72(1)
Agreement
72(4)
Agreement in Gender
72(1)
Agreement in Number
73(1)
Constructio and Sensum
74(1)
Agreement with Two or More Co-ordinate Words
74(1)
More Serious Incongruencies (Solecisms)
75(1)
Use of Gender and Number
76(3)
Gender
76(1)
Number
77(2)
Syntax of the Cases
79(31)
Nominative
79(2)
Vocative
81(1)
Accusative
82(7)
Genitive
89(11)
Dative
100(10)
Syntax of Prepositions
110(15)
Introduction
110(1)
Prepositions with One Case
110(9)
Prepositions with Two Cases
119(3)
Prepositions with Three Cases
122(3)
Syntax of Adjectives
125(4)
Attributive
125(1)
Predicate Adjective Corresponding to an Adverb (or Prepositional Phrase)
126(1)
Comparison
126(3)
Syntax of Numerals
129(2)
The Article
131(14)
`O η τo as a Pronoun
131(1)
The Article with a Substantive
131(7)
The Article with Adjectives Used as Substantives
138(1)
The Substantivizing Article with Numerals, Adverbs, etc
139(1)
The Article with Appositives
140(1)
The Article with Two or More Attributives
140(1)
The Article and the Position of the Attributive
141(2)
The Article with Predicate Nouns
143(1)
The Article with Pronouns and Pronominal Adjectives
143(1)
The Article with Two or More Substantives Connected by και
144(1)
Syntax of Pronouns
145(16)
Personal Pronouns
145(2)
Reflexive Pronouns
147(1)
Possessive Pronouns
148(2)
Reciprocal Pronouns
150(1)
Aυτoς as Intensive and Identical
150(1)
Demonstrative Pronouns
150(2)
Relative Pronouns
152(3)
Interrogative Pronouns
155(3)
Indefinite Pronouns
158(1)
Derivative Correlatives
159(1)
Pronominal Adjectives
160(1)
Syntax of the Verb
161(59)
Voice
161(5)
Active
161(3)
Passive
164(1)
Middle
165(1)
Tense
166(15)
The Present Indicative
167(2)
The Imperfect and Aorist Indicatives
169(3)
The Present and Aorist Imperatives and the Prohibitive and Adhortative Subjunctives
172(2)
The Present and Aorist Infinitives
174(1)
The Present and Aorist Participles
174(1)
The Perfect
175(2)
The Pluperfect
177(1)
The Future
178(1)
Periphrastic Conjugations
179(2)
The Moods
181(39)
The Indicative of Secondary Tenses in Main Clauses
181(2)
The Future Indicative for Volitive Expressions in Main Clauses (instead of the Imperative and Subjunctive)
183(1)
The Subjunctive in Main Clauses
183(2)
Indicative and Subjunctive in Subordinate Clauses
185(9)
The Optative
194(1)
The Imperative
195(1)
The Infinitive
196(16)
The Participle
212(8)
Adverbs and Particles
220(19)
Negatives
220(4)
Adverbs
224(1)
Particles and Conjunctions
225(14)
Modal Particles
226(1)
Co-ordinating (Paratactic) Conjunctions
227(9)
Subordinating (Hypotactic) Conjunctions
236(3)
Sentence Structure
239(9)
Asyndeton
240(2)
The Period
242(1)
The Parenthesis
242(1)
Anacoluthon
243(4)
The Use of Parataxis in the Vernacular
247(1)
Word and Clause Order
248(5)
Word Order
248(5)
Clause Order
253(1)
Ellipsis, Brachylogy, Pleonasm
253(3)
Ellipsis and Brachylogy
253(3)
Pleonasm
256(1)
The Arrangement of Words: Figures of Speech
256(1)
Figures of Expression
257(5)
Figures of Thought
262(3)
Indices
Index of Subjects
265(9)
Index of Greek Words and Forms
274(16)
Index of References
302

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