9781853831515

Greening International Law

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781853831515

  • ISBN10:

    1853831514

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1996-09-01
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $58.50 Save up to $28.28
  • Rent Book $52.65
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental and eBook copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Environmental problems do not respect international boundaries; they affect the entire globe, and dealing with them is a matter for international political negotiation, law and institutions.Greening International Law assesses the extent to which the international community has so far adapted to address environmental problems, and examines the fundamental changes needed to the structure and organisation of the legal system and its institutions. The contributors to this volume have all played a central role in the development of international environmental law over the past decade, and their essays will be of interest to all those professionally, academically or individually concerned with the resolution of environmental problems.

Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Acknowledgements xi
List of Contributors
xiii
Introduction xv
International Environmental Law from Stockholm to Rio: Back to the Future?
1(19)
Marc Pallemaerts
UNCED and the progressive development of law
1(1)
The never-ending quest for general principles
2(3)
Sovereignty versus responsibility
5(3)
Environmental law and human rights law
8(5)
From `sustainable development' to `sustainable growth'
13(3)
Absorbing environmental law into economic law
16(2)
Where is the future for environmental law?
18(2)
The Rio Declaration: A New Basis for International Cooperation
20(15)
Ileana Porras
Using the `environment' to achieve a new globalism
20(2)
Negotiation of the Rio Declaration
22(2)
Integrating environment and development
24(3)
Common but differentiated responsibilities
27(3)
In defence of sovereignty
30(2)
Conclusion
32(3)
Defending the Global Commons
35(15)
Christopher Stone
Introduction
35(4)
A voice for the environment: global commons guardians
39(4)
Financing the repair: the global commons trust fund
43(6)
Conclusion
49(1)
Enforcing Environmental Security
50(15)
Philippe Sands
Introduction
50(2)
Resolving environmental conflicts
52(7)
Challenges to environmental security
59(4)
UNCED and beyond
63(1)
Conclusion
64(1)
Greening Bretton Woods
65(20)
Jacob D Werksman
Introduction
65(2)
Historical overview: incompatible structures and conflicting interests
67(2)
The World Bank and the environment
69(5)
UNCED: principles for development lending
74(5)
UNCED and Agenda 21: Institutional Reform
79(5)
A restructured bank
84(1)
Greening the EEC Treaty
85(15)
Marina Wheeler
Introduction
85(1)
The constitutional position: building environment into the Treaty
85(4)
The practice: reconciling trade and environment concerns
89(7)
The GATT experience and restrictions on external Community trade
96(3)
Conclusion
99(1)
The GATT and the Environment
100(22)
James Cameron
Introduction
100(6)
A selection of environmental challenges to free trade: in a legal context
106(10)
The elements of sustainable development and the failure of the GATT/MTO to accommodate them
116(3)
Conclusion
119(3)
Environmental Law and Policy in Antarctica
122(18)
Lee Kimball
Introduction
122(2)
The quiet pursuit of science
124(1)
The resource issues heat up again
125(3)
Enter the environmentalist
128(2)
The 1980s: the decade of the environment
130(5)
Accountability
135(3)
Conclusion
138(2)
Radioactive Waste Dumping at Sea
140(19)
Remi Parmentier
Introduction
140(1)
Current sea dumping regime: a historical overview
140(2)
The radioactive waste dumping controversy
142(4)
Future options
146(4)
The 1992 Paris convention compromise formula
150(5)
Amendment confernce: toward the `greening' of the London Convention
155(1)
Conclusion
156(3)
The Evolution of International Whaling
159(23)
Greg Rose
Saundra Crane
Introduction
159(7)
Environmental pressure on the IWC
166(3)
Maintaining the moratorium
169(1)
Revised management procedures
170(5)
Small cetaceans
175(3)
Threats to the IWC
178(1)
Conclusion
179(3)
Technology-based Approaches Versus Market-based Approaches
182(28)
Dan Dudek
Richard Stewart
Jonathan Wiener
Introduction
182(1)
Approaches to environmental policy
183(7)
The need for comprehensive policy
190(2)
Market-based approaches in action
192(14)
Recommendations for environmental policy
206(3)
Conclusion
209(1)
Notes and references 210(35)
Glossary 245(3)
List of Treaties and Other International Acts 248(4)
List of Cases 252(2)
Index 254

Rewards Program

Write a Review