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Groups Process and Practice: Process and Practice,9780534347895
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Groups Process and Practice: Process and Practice

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780534347895

ISBN10:
0534347894
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/21/2001
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole
List Price: $80.33
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Summary

Drawing on their extensive clinical experience in working with groups, Marianne and Gerald Corey have updated their best-seller with new examples, guidelines, insights, and ideas that demonstrate how group leaders can apply the basic issues and key concepts of the group process to a variety of groups. Offering up-to-date coverage of both the "what is" and the 'how to' of group counseling, the Sixth Edition features a greater focus on cultural competence, more technological integration, and more case examples and sample dialogues in every chapter.

Author Biography

Marianne Schneider Corey is a licensed marriage and family therapist in California and is a National Certified Counselor.

Table of Contents

PART 1 Introduction: Basic Issues in Group Work 2(94)
Introduction to Group Work
4(20)
Focus Questions
6(1)
Introduction
6(1)
The Theory Behind the Practice
7(5)
Group Process and Techniques
7(1)
Our Theoretical Orientation
8(3)
Developing Your Own Theory of Group Practice
11(1)
An Overview of Various Types of Groups
12(4)
Task Facilitation Group
12(1)
Psychoeducational Group
12(2)
Counseling Group
14(1)
Psychotherapy Group
15(1)
A Multicultural Perspective on Group Work
16(2)
Points to Remember
18(1)
Introduction to Group Work
18(1)
A Challenge to Become an Active Learner
19(1)
Exercises
19(4)
The Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge, and Skills Survey (MAKSS)
20(3)
InfoTrac College Edition
23(1)
The Group Counselor: Person and Professional
24(42)
Focus Questions
26(1)
Introduction
26(1)
The Group Counselor as a Person
27(6)
Problems and Issues Facing Beginning Group Leaders
27(1)
Personal Characteristics of the Effective Group Leader
28(5)
The Group Counselor as a Professional
33(7)
Overview of Group Leadership Skills
33(6)
An Integrated View of Leadership Skills
39(1)
Becoming a Diversity-Competent Group Counselor
40(4)
Ethics and Standards of Preparation and Practice
41(1)
A Framework for Developing Diversity Competence
42(2)
The Coleadership Model
44(4)
The Basis of Coleadership
44(2)
Advantages of the Coleadership Model
46(1)
Disadvantages of the Coleadership Model
47(1)
Professional Development and Training
48(6)
The Issue of Leader Competence
48(2)
Professional Training Standards for Group Counselors
50(1)
Training and Personal Experience
51(1)
Ethical Issues in Training Group Counselors
52(2)
Developing a Research Orientation to Practice
54(3)
The Current Status of Group Work Research
54(1)
Obstacles to the Advancement of Research on Group Work
55(1)
The Challenge of Combining Research and Practice
56(1)
Points to Remember
57(2)
Concepts and Guidelines for Group Practitioners
57(2)
Exercises
59(6)
Attitude Questionnaire on Group Leadership
59(2)
Self-Assessment of Group Leadership Skills
61(4)
InfoTrac College Edition
65(1)
Ethical and Legal Issues in Group Counseling
66(28)
Focus Questions
68(1)
Introduction
68(2)
Ethical Issues in Group Membership
70(5)
Informed Consent
70(1)
Involuntary Membership
71(1)
Freedom to Withdraw From a Group
71(1)
Psychological Risks for Members
72(3)
Confidentiality
75(2)
Uses and Abuses of Group Techniques
77(2)
The Role of the Leader's Values in the Group
79(1)
Guidelines for Ethical and Legal Practice
80(3)
Legal Liability and Malpractice
81(1)
Legal Safeguards for Group Practitioners
81(2)
Joining Professional Organizations
83(1)
Points to Remember
84(2)
Ethical and Legal Issues in Group Counseling
84(2)
Exercises
86(3)
In-Class Activities
86(1)
Questions to Consider in Examining the ``Best Practice Guidelines''
87(2)
InfoTrac College Edition
89(1)
ASGW ``Best Practice Guidelines''
90(4)
PART 2 Group Process: Stages of Development 94(184)
Forming a Group
96(28)
Focus Questions
98(1)
Introduction
98(3)
Developing a Proposal for a Group
99(1)
Working Within the System
100(1)
Attracting and Screening Members
101(6)
Guidelines for Announcing a Group and Recruiting Group Members
101(1)
Practical Procedures for Announcements and Recruitment
102(1)
Screening and Selection Procedures
103(4)
Practical Considerations in Forming a Group
107(3)
Group Composition
107(1)
Group Size
107(1)
Frequency and Duration of Meetings
107(1)
Length of a Group
108(1)
Place for Group Meetings
108(1)
Open Versus Closed Groups
109(1)
The Uses of a Pregroup Meeting
110(5)
Clarifying Leader and Member Expectations
111(1)
Setting Up Basic Ground Rules
111(2)
Exploring the Advantages of and Misconceptions About Groups
113(2)
An Integrated Approach to Pregroup Preparation: Research Findings
115(3)
Building Evaluation Into Group Work
117(1)
Coleader Issues on Forming a Group
118(1)
Points to Remember
119(1)
Member Functions
119(1)
Leader Functions
119(1)
Exercises
120(3)
Group Planning
120(1)
Interviewing
120(1)
Group Class
121(1)
Guide to Evolution of a Group Video
121(2)
InfoTrac College Edition
123(1)
Initial Stage of a Group
124(46)
Focus Questions
126(1)
Introduction
126(1)
Group Characteristics at the Initial Stage
126(6)
Some Early Concerns
127(1)
Initial Resistance
127(2)
Hidden Agendas
129(1)
Address Conflict Early
130(1)
Self-Focus Versus Focus on Others
131(1)
Here-and-Now Focus Versus There-and-Then Focus
131(1)
Trust Versus Mistrust
132(1)
Creating Trust: Leader and Member Roles
132(6)
The Importance of Modeling
132(2)
Attitudes and Actions Leading to Trust
134(4)
Identifying and Clarifying Goals
138(2)
General Goals for Group Members
138(1)
Helping Members Define Personal Goals
139(1)
Group Process Concepts at the Initial Stage
140(5)
Group Norms
141(3)
Group Cohesion
144(1)
Helping Members Get the Most From a Group Experience
145(10)
Leader Guidelines for Members
146(6)
Avoid Too Much Teaching
152(1)
Journal Writing as an Adjunct to Group Sessions
152(2)
Homework During the Initial Stage
154(1)
Leader Issues at the Initial Stage
155(9)
Division of Responsibility
156(1)
Degree of Structuring
157(3)
Opening and Closing Group Sessions
160(4)
Points to Remember
164(2)
Initial Stage Characteristics
164(1)
Member Functions
164(1)
Leader Functions
165(1)
Exercises
166(3)
Facilitation of Initial Stage of a Group
166(1)
Guide to Evolution of a Group Video
167(2)
InfoTrac College Edition
169(1)
Transition Stage of a Group
170(46)
Focus Questions
172(1)
Introduction
172(1)
Characteristics of the Transition Stage
173(11)
Anxiety
173(1)
The Testing Process and Building Trust
173(1)
Defensiveness and Resistance
174(4)
The Struggle for Control
178(1)
Conflict
179(1)
Confrontation
180(2)
Challenges to the Group Leader
182(1)
The Leader's Reactions to Resistance
183(1)
Problem Behaviors and Difficult Group Members
184(12)
Silence and Lack of Participation
185(1)
Monopolistic Behavior
186(2)
Storytelling
188(1)
Questioning
189(1)
Giving Advice
190(1)
Band-Aiding
191(1)
Hostile Behavior
192(1)
Dependency
192(2)
Acting Superior
194(1)
Socializing
194(1)
Intellectualizing
195(1)
Emotionalizing
195(1)
Dealing with Resistance Therapeutically
196(2)
Dealing with Resistance by the Whole Group
198(4)
Dealing with Transference and Countertransference
202(3)
Effective Leadership: Research Findings
205(3)
Support Versus Confrontation
206(1)
Guidelines for Creating Therapeutic Relationships With Members
207(1)
Coleader Issues at the Transition Stage
208(1)
Points to Remember
209(2)
Transition Stage Characteristics
209(1)
Member Functions
209(1)
Leader Functions
210(1)
Exercises
211(4)
Self-Assessment Scale
211(1)
Questions for Exploration
212(1)
Guide to Evolution of a Group Video
213(2)
InfoTrac College Edition
215(1)
Working Stage of a Group
216(40)
Focus Questions
218(1)
Introduction
218(1)
Progressing From the Transition Stage to the Working Stage
219(2)
Leader Interventions in Working With a Member's Fear
221(3)
Interventions at the Initial Stage
222(1)
Interventions at the Transition Stage
222(1)
Interventions at the Working Stage
223(1)
Tasks of the Working Stage
224(8)
Group Norms and Behavior
224(1)
Contrasts Between a Working Group and a Nonworking Group
225(3)
Deepening Trust During the Working Stage
228(1)
Choices to Be Made During the Working Stage
229(2)
Homework During the Working Stage
231(1)
Therapeutic Factors That Operate in a Group
232(13)
Self-Disclosure and the Group Member
232(1)
Self-Disclosure and the Group Leader
233(2)
Confrontation
235(1)
Feedback
235(3)
Cohesion and Universality
238(1)
Hope
239(1)
Willingness to Risk and to Trust
239(1)
Caring and Acceptance
240(1)
Power
241(1)
Catharsis
241(2)
The Cognitive Component
243(1)
Commitment to Change
243(1)
Freedom to Experiment
244(1)
Humor
244(1)
Research Implications for the Working Stage
245(6)
Research Into Cohesion
246(1)
Research Into Self-Disclosure
247(2)
Research Into Feedback
249(2)
Coleader Issues During the Working Stage
251(1)
Topics for Coleader Meetings
251(1)
Points to Remember
252(2)
Working Stage Characteristics
252(1)
Member Functions
253(1)
Leader Functions
253(1)
Exercises
254(1)
Assessment of the Working Stage
254(1)
Guide to Evolution of a Group Video
254(1)
InfoTrac College Edition
255(1)
Ending a Group
256(22)
Focus Questions
258(1)
Introduction
258(1)
Tasks of the Final Stage of a Group: Consolidation of Learning
259(1)
Termination of the Group Experience
260(7)
Dealing With Feelings of Separation
260(1)
Dealing With Unfinished Business
261(1)
Reviewing the Group Experience
261(1)
Practice for Behavioral Change
262(1)
Giving and Receiving Feedback
263(1)
Carrying Learning Further
264(1)
The Use of a Contract and Homework
264(2)
Guidelines for Applying Group Learning to Life
266(1)
Some Final Considerations
267(1)
Evaluation of the Group Experience
267(2)
Coleader Issues as the Group Ends
269(1)
Follow-Up
270(2)
Postgroup Sessions
270(1)
Individual Follow-Up Interviews
271(1)
Points to Remember
272(2)
Ending Stage Characteristics
272(1)
Member Functions
272(1)
Leader Functions
273(1)
Exercises
274(3)
Final Stage of a Group
274(1)
Guide to Evolution of a Group Video
275(2)
InfoTrac College Edition
277(1)
PART 3 Application of Group Process to Specific Groups 278(134)
Groups for Children
280(24)
Focus Questions
282(1)
Introduction
282(1)
Guidelines for Group Work With Children and Adolescents
283(5)
Developing a Sound Proposal
283(1)
Legal Considerations
284(1)
Practical Considerations
284(1)
Strategies in the Group
285(2)
Personal and Professional Qualifications
287(1)
Be Aware of Your Own Limitations
287(1)
Group Proposal: A School Counseling Group for 6- to 11-Year-Olds
288(6)
Group Proposal: A Group for Children of Divorce and Changing Families
294(5)
The Challenge of Helping Children Deal With Anger and Conflict
299(1)
Group Proposal: Children's Anger Management and Conflict Resolution Group
299(3)
Points to Remember
302(1)
Groups for Children
302(1)
Exercises
302(1)
In-Class Activities
302(1)
InfoTrac College Edition
303(1)
Where to Go From Here
303(1)
Groups for Adolescents
304(40)
Focus Questions
306(1)
Introduction
306(3)
Organizing the Group Experience for Adolescents
309(1)
Issues and Challenges in Leading Adolescent Groups
310(8)
Establishing Trust
310(1)
Working With Involuntary and Reluctant Adolescent Group Members
311(3)
The Influence of the Leader's Personality
314(1)
Keeping the Sessions Moving
314(1)
Action-Oriented Techniques of Role Playing
315(2)
Getting Group Members to Participate and Initiate
317(1)
Involving Parents
318(1)
Group Proposal: Multiple Family Group Therapy
319(5)
Group Proposal: Teens Making a Change (T-MAC): A Group Addressing Teen Delinquency in an Apartment Complex
324(4)
Group Proposal: A High School Group for Children of Alcoholics
328(3)
Group Proposal: Aftercare: A Group for Students Seeking Recovery
331(2)
Group Proposal: A Group for Unwed Teenage Fathers
333(2)
Group Proposal: Sex Offender Treatment Group for Boys
335(6)
Points to Remember
341(1)
Groups for Adolescents
341(1)
Exercises
341(1)
In-Class Activities
341(1)
InfoTrac College Edition
342(1)
Where to Go From Here
343(1)
Groups for Adults
344(36)
Focus Questions
346(1)
Introduction
346(1)
Topic-Oriented Groups
347(1)
Groups for College Students
347(2)
Common Topics in College Groups
348(1)
A Cautionary Note
348(1)
Groups for Weight Control
349(2)
Group Proposal: A Group for Treating Compulsive Eating
351(3)
The AIDS Crisis as a Challenge for Group Workers
354(2)
How Groups Can Help
354(1)
An Educational Focus in AIDS Groups
355(1)
Group Proposal: An HIV/AIDS Support Group
356(5)
Group Work With Women
361(1)
Group Proposal: A Relational Women's Support Group: A Power Source for Women's Voices
361(5)
Group Proposal: A Women's Support Group for Survivors of Incest
366(4)
Group Proposal: A Men's Group in a Community Agency
370(3)
Group Proposal: A Domestic Violence Group
373(4)
Points to Remember
377(1)
Groups for Adults
377(1)
Exercises
378(1)
In-Class Activities
378(1)
InfoTrac College Edition
378(1)
Where to Go From Here
379(1)
Groups for the Elderly
380(32)
Focus Questions
382(1)
Introduction
382(2)
Unique Characteristics of the Elderly
384(1)
Practical and Professional Considerations for Group Work With the Elderly
385(4)
Guidelines for the Group Process
385(3)
Attitudes and Skills of Leaders
388(1)
Special Groups for the Elderly
389(3)
Group Proposal: A Program for Institutionalized Elderly People
392(5)
Guidelines for Working With Healthy Aging People in Groups
397(1)
Group Proposal: A Combined Group for the Elderly and Adolescents
398(3)
The Therapeutic Value of Grief Work
401(1)
Group Proposal: An Elderly Bereavement Group
402(6)
Points to Remember
408(1)
Groups for the Elderly
408(1)
Exercises
409(1)
In-Class Activities
409(1)
InfoTrac College Edition
410(1)
Where to Go From Here
410(2)
Appendix: Web Site Resources 412(3)
References and Suggested Readings 415(12)
Name Index 427(4)
Subject Index 431


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