9781559637428

Growing Greener : Putting Conservation into Local Plans and Ordinances

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781559637428

  • ISBN10:

    1559637420

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1999-11-01
  • Publisher: Island Pr
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Supplemental Materials

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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Growing Greeneris an illustrated workbook that presents a new look at designing subdivisions while preserving green space and creating open space networks. Randall Arendt explains how to design residential developments that maximize land conservation without reducing overall building density, thus avoiding the political and legal problems often associated with "down-zoning."The author offers a three-pronged strategy for shaping growth around a community's special natural and cultural features, demonstrating ways of establishing or modifying the municipal comprehensive plan, zoning ordinance, and subdivision ordinance to include a strong conservation focus. Open space protection becomes the central organizing principle for new residential development, and the open space that is protected is laid out to form an interconnected system of protected lands running across a community.The book offers: detailed information on how to conduct a community resource inventory a four-step approach to designing conservation subdivisions extensive model language for comprehensive plans, subdivision ordinances, and zoning ordinances illustrated design principles for hamlets, villages, and traditional small town neighborhoodsIn addition, Growing Greenerincludes eleven case studies of actual conservation developments in nine states, and two exercises suitable for group participation. Case studies include: Ringfield, Chadds Ford Township, Pennsylvania; The Fields of St. Croix, City of Lake Elmo, Minnesota; Prairie Crossing, Grayslake, Illinois; The Meadows at Dolly Gordon Brook, York, Maine; Farmcolony, Standsville, Virginia; The Ranch at Roaring Fork, Carbondale, Colorado; and others.Growing Greenerbuilds upon and expands the basic ideas presented in Arendt's earlier work Conservation Design for Subdivisions, broadening the scope to include more detailed sections on the comprehensive planning process and information on how zoning ordinances can be updated to incorporate the concept of conservation design. It is the first practical publication to explain in detail how resource-conserving development techniques can be put into practice by municipal officials, residential developers, and site designers, and it offers a simple and straightforward approach to balancing opportunities for developers and conservationists.

Author Biography

Randall Arendt is vice president for conservation planning for the Natural Lands Trust in Media, Pennsylvania.

Table of Contents

Foreword: The Growing Greener Program xiii
Preface: Designing Land Development from a Bird's Perspective (Among Others) xix
Introduction: How This Book Can Help You xxiii
Context
1(6)
Growth and Development Trends
1(2)
Our Natural and Cultural Heritage
3(1)
Growing Greener Applicability in a Wide Variety of Density Situations
4(1)
Reasons for Updating Plans and Codes to Include a Conservation Focus
4(1)
Frequently Asked Questions About Conservation Subdivision Design
5(2)
How Your Community Can Choose Its Own Future
7(12)
The Community Audit Process
8(11)
Numerical Analysis
9(1)
Written Review of Ordinances and Private Conservation Efforts
9(5)
Build-Out Maps
14(1)
Eight Self-Diagnostic Questions for Community Leaders
15(4)
Comprehensive Plan Update
19(10)
Understanding the Importance of Comprehensive Plans
19(1)
Five Parts of the Plan on Which to Focus
20(1)
The Community Resource Inventory: Varying Degrees of Completeness
21(1)
The Community Resource Inventory: Nine Elements to Be Included
22(2)
Official Maps of Conservation Lands, Parklands, and Trails
24(1)
Community-Wide Map of Potential Conservation Lands
24(2)
Plan Language Regarding Implementation Through Ordinances
26(3)
Conservation Zoning Techniques
29(24)
A Choice of Options for Conservation and Development
30(4)
About the District Types
31(3)
Illustrative Examples of the Various Options in a Rural Zoning District
34(6)
Preexisting Zoning Requirements: Baseline Example
35(1)
Notes About Lot Sizes in Options 1 Through 5
35(1)
Neutral Density and Basic Conservation
36(1)
Enhanced Conservation and Density
36(1)
Estate Lots
37(1)
Country Properties
37(2)
Village Design with Greenbelt
39(1)
Combining the Options on a Single Property
40(1)
How Densities are Determined
40(3)
First Method: Applying Density Factors
41(2)
Second Method: The Yield Plan
43(1)
Dimensional Standards for House Lots in Conservation Subdivisions
43(5)
Lot Size and Value
44(1)
Appearance and Community Character
45(1)
Accommodating Wells and Septic Disposal Systems
46(2)
Density Bonuses to Further Certain Public Objectives
48(2)
Encouraging Public Usage
49(1)
Endowing Management Costs
49(1)
Encouraging Housing Affordability
49(1)
Standards for Ownership, Protection, and Management of Conservation Lands
50(3)
Ownership of Conservation Lands
50(1)
Ensuring Permanent Protection of Conservation Lands
51(1)
Management of Conservation Lands
52(1)
Conservation Subdivisions: Application Documents, Design Process, and Conservation Land Design Standards
53(26)
Basic Required Application Documents
54(1)
Site Context Map
54(1)
Existing Resources/Site Analysis Map
54(1)
Elements of Existing Resources/Site Analysis Maps: Significance and Sources
55(7)
Wetlands
55(1)
Floodplains
56(1)
Slopes
56(1)
Soils
56(1)
Significant Wildlife Habitats
57(1)
Woodlands and Vegetation Patterns
58(1)
Farmland
59(1)
Historic, Archaeological, and Cultural Features
60(1)
Views Into and Out from the Site
61(1)
Groundwater Resources and Their Recharge Areas
62(1)
Integrating the Information Layers and Ranking Site Features for Conservation Priority
62(2)
Ranking Site Features for Conservation Priority
63(1)
Special Procedural Steps Recommended for Conservation Subdivisions
64(1)
The Four-Step Approach to Designing Conservation Subdivisions
65(9)
``Yield Plan'' to Determine Density
66(1)
Identifying Conservation Areas
67(1)
Locating the House Sites
68(2)
Aligning Streets and Trails
70(1)
Drawing in the Lot Lines
71(1)
Note on Design Sequence for Village Layouts
72(1)
Technical Notes on Street Design
72(2)
Preserving Rural Character Through ``Foreground Meadows''
74(1)
Design of Conservation Lands
74(5)
Location of Conservation Lands
75(1)
Layout of Conservation Lands
75(2)
Prioritizing Site Resource Areas for Conservation
77(2)
Benefits of Conservation Planning and Design
79(12)
Environmental and Ecological Benefits
79(5)
Wildlife Management
80(1)
Greater Water Quality Protection Through Improved Buffers
80(1)
Greater Aquifer Recharge Through Improved Stormwater Management
81(1)
Environmentally Sensitive Sewage Treatment and Disposal
81(3)
Social and Recreational Benefits
84(4)
Pedestrian-Friendly Neighborhoods
84(1)
Community Activities
85(1)
Community-Wide Greenways and Trails
85(1)
Communities with Multiple Conservation Subdivisions
85(2)
Model for the Midwest
87(1)
Economic Benefits
88(3)
Lower Costs
88(1)
Marketing and Sales Advantages
88(1)
Value Appreciation
89(1)
Reduced Demand for New Public Parkland
90(1)
Smoother Review
90(1)
Examples of Subdivisions with Substantial Conservation Areas
91(24)
Ringfield, Chadds Ford Township, Pennsylvania
92(1)
The Ponds at Woodward, Kennett Township, Pennsylvania
93(2)
The Fields of St. Croix, City of Lake Elmo, Minnesota
95(2)
Prairie Crossing, Grayslake, Illinois
97(2)
The Preserve at Hunter's Lake, Ottawa Township, Wisconsin
99(2)
The Meadows at Dolly Gordon Brook, York, Maine
101(3)
Farmcolony, Stanardsville, Virginia
104(2)
Westwood Common, Beverly Hills, Michigan
106(2)
Hunter's Pointe and Solitude Pointe, Hamburg Township, Michigan
108(1)
The Ranch at Roaring Fork, Carbondale, Colorado
109(3)
Village Homes, Davis, California
112(3)
Design Exercise 1: Community-Wide Map of Potential Conservation Lands 115(10)
Resource Data Layers
116(7)
The Exercise: Combining Data Layers to Create an Integrated Map
123(2)
Design Exercise 2: Laying Out a Conservation Subdivision 125(10)
The Site: Riparian Woodlands and Meadows
125(2)
Site Analysis Phase
127(1)
Design Phase
128(4)
One Solution to Design Exercise 2
132(1)
Note on Scale and Density: Applying This Example in Townships with One-Acre Zoning
133(2)
Appendix 1: Frequently Asked Questions About Conservation Subdivision Design 135(8)
Appendix 2: Model Comprehensive Plan Language 143(8)
Zoning Ordinance Refinements
144(3)
Subdivision Ordinance Refinements
147(4)
Appendix 3: Model Ordinance Language for Conservation Subdivisions 151(72)
Zoning Ordinance Language
151(16)
Article 1: Conservation Design Overlay District
151(16)
Subdivision Ordinance Language
167(56)
Article 4: Plan Content Requirements
167(7)
Article 5: Plan Processing Procedures
174(8)
Article 6: Resource Conservation and Greenway Delineation Standards
182(7)
Article 7: Supplemental Design Standards for Option 5 Hamlets and Villages
189(34)
Suggested Further Reading 223(4)
About the Author 227(2)
Index 229

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