CART

(0) items

Growing up Gifted : Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School,9780130944375
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Growing up Gifted : Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780130944375

ISBN10:
0130944378
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $124.66
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $1.89

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Growing up Gifted : Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School
    Growing up Gifted : Developing the Potential of Children at Home and at School
  • Growing up Gifted : Developing the Potential of Children at School and at Home
    Growing up Gifted : Developing the Potential of Children at School and at Home




Summary

This leading introduction to gifted and talented children retains proven parts of its original structure and combines it with the knowledge and best practices from a variety of sources. It incorporates knowledge from many disciplines and integrates best practices from classrooms to inform readers of how to work with children who grow up gifted and bring their gifts to the world. The author encourages readers to understand intelligence in order to help more children realize their unique potential of gifts and talents. New chapters contain the latest information on "hot" areas of interest: Outreach of Programs and Program Evaluation, and Planning for Integrative Education: Using Brain Research in the Classroom. A unique chapter on diversity considers the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, and poverty on the development and expression of giftedness--and offers interventions to overcome the barriers these cultural groups might present. Other content includes identification of special students and explores the issues and controversies surrounding the education of these children. For teachers of gifted and talented students.

Table of Contents

PART I UNDERSTANDING THE GIFTED INDIVIDUAL
Discussing Issues of Excellence and Equity: Gifted Education and Talent Development
3(21)
The Dual Mission of Gifted Education
4(1)
Balancing Excellence and Equity
4(1)
A Rationale for Gifted Education and Talen Development
5(2)
Excellence, Equity, and the Gifted Student
7(3)
The Javits Act Program
8(1)
National Excellence: A Case for Developing America's Talent
9(1)
Interest in Educating Gifted Learners
10(2)
Barriers to Appropriate Education for Gifted Students and the Development of Talent
12(7)
Elitism: A Problem or a Blessing?
12(2)
Age-Grouped Classes
14(1)
Uninformed Attitudes and Beliefs of Educators and Decision Makers
15(2)
Unbalanced Educational Reform
17(2)
Other Current Issues
19(1)
A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child
19(1)
Questions Often Asked
20(2)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
22(1)
Summary
22(2)
Discovering Who the Gifted Individuals Are
24(49)
Intelligence, Giftedness, and Talent Development
25(9)
Definitions
26(1)
Intelligence, Giftedness, and Talent As Performance
26(2)
Intelligence, Giftedness, and Talent As an Integration of Brain Funcations
28(5)
Talent Development
33(1)
The Concept of Intelligence
34(22)
A Historical Overview of Intelligence
34(1)
The Development of Intelligence
34(16)
The Gifted Brain: Implications of Brain Research for Educators
50(6)
Characteristics of Gifted Learners
56(1)
Highly and Exceptionally Gifted Individuals
57(12)
Questions Often Asked
69(2)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
71(1)
Summary
71(2)
Being Creative: Going Beyond Giftedness
73(35)
Creativity: Views of the Concept
74(8)
A Holistic View
75(2)
Creativity and Its Relationship to Giftedness
77(1)
The Cognitive or Rational View of Creativity
77(2)
The Affective/Emotional-Social View of Creativity
79(1)
The Physical/Sensing View of Creativity
80(1)
The Intuitive View of Creativity
80(1)
Integrating the Views of Creativity
80(2)
Characteristics Commonly Found in Creative Individuals
82(4)
Conditions That Enhance or Inhibit the Development of Creativity
86(7)
Nurturing Creativity at Home
87(1)
Nurturing Creativity at School
87(6)
Conditions That Inhibit Creativity
93(1)
Measuring Creativity
93(5)
Creativity Tests and Measures
95(2)
Problems Measuring Creativity
97(1)
Being Creative
98(3)
Developing Creative Behavior
101(1)
Questions Often Asked
101(4)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
105(1)
Summary
105(3)
Becoming Gifted
108(59)
Early Learning: The Importance of Developing Potential
111(5)
Clues From Animal Studies
112(2)
Prenatal and Perinatal Interaction
114(2)
Optimizing Learning: Developing Giftedness (Birth Through 2 Years)
116(18)
Creating a Responsive Learning Environment for Early Learning
117(11)
Sensitive and Critical Periods for Learning
128(5)
Discipline
133(1)
Nurturing Giftedness During Early Childhood (2 Through 5 Years)
134(16)
Development of the Rational Mind
135(3)
Development of the Metaphoric Mind
138(1)
Young Gifted Children
139(1)
The Preschool Experience
140(10)
Parenting Gifted Children: Teachers of the Gifted at Home
150(13)
Development of Giftedness and Talents
155(2)
Siblings of Gifted Children
157(1)
Organizing for Cooperation
158(2)
Parent In-Service
160(1)
Parents As Resources
161(2)
Questions Often Asked
163(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
164(1)
Summary
165(2)
Growing Up Gifted
167(46)
Social-Emotional Development and Giftedness
168(9)
Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Learners
169(6)
Social-Emotional Adjustment of Gifted Learners
175(2)
The Self-Concept of the Gifted Individual
177(12)
Development of Self-Esteem
183(6)
Moral Development
189(3)
The Developing Personality
192(4)
Attitudes of Society
193(1)
Attitudes of Teachers and Other School Personnel
194(2)
Adolescence: A Particularly Challenging Period of Growth
196(10)
The Physical Transition
199(1)
The Intellectual Transition
200(2)
The Social-Emotional Transition
202(3)
The Intuitive Transition
205(1)
Questions Often Asked
206(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
207(1)
Summary
208(5)
PART II THE SCHOOL AND THE GIFTED INDIVIDUAL
Developing Support Systems for Programs for Gifted Learners
213(39)
Programs for Gifted Learners Yesterday and Today
215(2)
Education of the Gifted Learner
215(2)
Mandating Service to Gifted Students
217(1)
Teachers of the Gifted: At School
217(17)
Abilities, Values, and Characteristics
220(4)
Teacher Education and Certification
224(10)
The Importance of Support for Effective Programs
234(7)
Gaining the Support of Teachers
234(2)
Gaining the Support of Parents
236(3)
Gaining the Support of the Administration
239(2)
Counselors and Psychologists As Support Personnel
241(5)
Interactions Among Counselors and Other Educational Team Members
245(1)
Gaining the Support of the Community
246(3)
Questions Often Asked
249(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
250(1)
Summary
250(2)
Providing a Continuum of Services for Gifted Learners
252(48)
Developing Programs for Gifted Learners
253(19)
Programming by Level of Involvement
255(1)
Programming in a Full-Inclusion Classroom
255(2)
Planning a Program for Gifted Learners
257(6)
Administrative Provisions
263(9)
Program Organizations and Structures for Gifted Learners in the Elementary Schools
272(10)
Organizational Modifications for Gifted Learners in the Elementary Schools
273(3)
Program Structures for Educating Elementary-Age Gifted Learners
276(5)
Program Limitations
281(1)
Program Organizations and Structures for Gifted Learners in the Middle School and High School
282(14)
Middle School Reform and Gifted Learners
284(1)
Other Limitations in Secondary Educational Structures
285(2)
Organizational Modifications for Gifted Learners in the Middle and High School
287(2)
Program Structures for Gifted Learners in Middle and High School Grades
289(4)
Student Views of Programs in the Middle and High Schools
293(3)
Questions Often Asked
296(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
297(1)
Summary
298(2)
Outreach of Programs and Program Evaluation
300(19)
Career Education for the Gifted Learner
301(5)
Suggested Programs
303(2)
Activities to Develop Awareness of Career Possibilities
305(1)
Rural Programs
306(1)
Using the Community
307(1)
Homeschooling: An Alternative Approach
308(3)
Global Education
311(2)
Evaluating Programs for Gifted Learners
313(3)
Questions Often Asked
316(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
317(1)
Summary
317(2)
Finding Gifted Learners in the Schools
319(42)
Different Approaches to Discovering Giftedness
321(2)
Search, Screening, and the Identification Procedures
323(18)
Measuring Intelligence
326(5)
Search
331(1)
Screening
331(4)
Identification
335(1)
Tools for Screening and Identification of Gifted and Talented Learners
336(5)
Identifying Culturally Diverse, Disabled, and Educationally Atypical Gifted Learners
341(9)
Screening for Gifted Potential Among Diverse Populations
341(1)
The Problems of Traditional Identification Processes for Culturally Diverse Learners
342(2)
Identification Tools and Procedures Designed and/or Suggested for Diverse Populations
344(2)
The Gifted Among Diverse Populations
346(2)
Identifying Students With Disabilities
348(2)
The Case Study
350(1)
Labeling Gifted Learners
351(1)
Questions Often Asked
352(2)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
354(2)
Summary
356(5)
PART III TEACHING GIFTED LEARNERS
Establishing the Foundation for Educating Gifted Learners
361(38)
Curriculum Models Often Used to Educate Gifted Learners
363(15)
The Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain and Affective Domain
363(3)
The Structure of Intellect Model
366(2)
The Enrichment Triad/Revolving Door Model
368(2)
The Grid
370(3)
The Integrative Education Model
373(1)
The Autonomous Learner Model
374(2)
The Multiple Intelligence (MI) Model
376(1)
The Triarchic Componential Model
376(1)
Other Theories and Models
377(1)
Seven Steps to Optimizing Learning
378(1)
Creating the Responsive Learning Environment
379(9)
The Physical Learning Environment
381(3)
The Social-Emotional Learning Environment
384(2)
Extending Learning Beyond the Classroom
386(1)
The Critical Role of the Teacher
387(1)
The Student's Role
388(1)
Assessment of the Needs and Abilities of Gifted Learners
388(8)
Assessing Knowledge, Understanding, and Interest
389(2)
Alternative, Performance-Based, and Authentic Assessment
391(1)
Standards and Rubrics
392(1)
Creating Student Portfolios
393(3)
Questions Often Asked
396(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
397(1)
Summary
397(2)
Planning for Integrative Education: Using Brain Research in the Classroom
399(47)
Integrating Intellectual Processes: The Integrative Education Model
400(1)
Integrating Cognitive Processes: Combining Rational-Linear and Spatial-Gestalt Functions of the Brain Hemispheres
401(8)
Strategies Integrating Rational-Linear and Spatial-Gestalt Cognitive Functions
405(2)
Strategies Integrating Cognition With Other Brain Funcations
407(2)
Integrating Affective Processes
409(8)
Empowering Language and Behavior
410(3)
Choice and Perceived Control
413(2)
Other Possibilities
415(2)
Integrating Physical Processes
417(6)
Relaxation and Tension Reduction
417(4)
Movement and Physical Encoding
421(2)
Integrating Intuitive Processes
423(11)
Defining Intuition
426(2)
Using Intuition
428(1)
Fostering Intuition
429(3)
Alternative Ways of Knowing and Futuristics
432(2)
Sample Lessons for Integrating Intellectual Processes
434(9)
Questions Often Asked
443(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
444(1)
Summary
444(2)
Differentiating and Individualizing the Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners
446(50)
Differentiating the Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners
448(28)
Providing Differentiation to Meet the Educational Needs of Gifted Learners
453(12)
Differentiating Curriculum Content
465(11)
Individualizing Instruction
476(10)
The Power of Choice
478(2)
Developing the Individual Educational Plan for Gifted Students
480(2)
A Format for Differentiated, Integrative, and Individualized Content
482(4)
Evaluating Learning and Teaching
486(5)
Grading Gifted Learners
486(5)
Reflect and Re-form
491(1)
Questions Often Asked
492(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
493(1)
Summary
494(2)
Understanding the Diversity of Cultures and Giftedness
496(43)
Cultural Diversity and Giftedness
497(3)
Multicultural Education and Gifted Learners
500(1)
Gifted Females
501(19)
Barriers to Equity
504(13)
What Can Be Done?
517(3)
Racially and Ethnically Diverse Gifted Populations
520(9)
Differences in Attitudes and Skills Among and Between Racial and Ethnic Cultures
521(6)
Choosing Teachers for Racially and Ethnically Diverse Gifted Learners
527(1)
Optimizing Learning for Racially and Ethnically Diverse Gifted Learners
528(1)
Economically Disadvantaged or Low-Socioeconomic-Status (SES) Gifted Students: The Culture of Poverty
529(6)
Characteristics of Low-SES Gifted Learners
530(2)
Intervention
532(3)
Questions Often Asked
535(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
536(1)
Summary
536(3)
Supporting Gifted Learners With Special Needs
539(26)
Underachieving Gifted Students
541(11)
Characteristics of Underachievers
542(1)
Causes for Underachievement
542(5)
Prevention and Remediation of Underachievement
547(5)
Gifted Learners With Disabilities
552(8)
Overcoming Teacher Attitudes
553(1)
Characteristics of Gifted Children With Disabilities
554(2)
Identification of Gifted Children With Disabilities
556(1)
Programming for Gifted Children With Disabilities
557(3)
Questions Often Asked
560(1)
Checking for Understanding: Follow-Up Activity
561(1)
Summary
561(4)
Epilogue Education of Gifted Learners: A Predictor of Future Possibilities of Society 565(2)
References 567(30)
Name Index 597(8)
Subject Index 605

Excerpts

This is the sixth edition ofGrowing Up Gifted.As I began the first edition more than 20 years ago, it was my intention to write a book for my students that would include the ideas I found important in supporting my work with gifted learners. I wanted the book to be helpful to the parents of gifted students as well because I believe that parents are their first and most important teachers. Brain researchers had just begun to talk about the implications of their work for human learning, and I wanted to make that information available to those with whom I worked. The importance of early learning in human mental development was just being noted and, in some scientific circles, enriching our heredity was first being discussed. I wanted to bring these ideas into the classrooms so that all children could come closer to reaching their full potential. As my students and I worked to bring research into practice for seven years in an experimental school setting we developed with gifted and highly gifted learners, we shared excitement and growth. Later editions of the book reflected that growth, explored new ideas, and began to be useful not only to my students but to students throughout the world. Over the years, the work of many other researchers enriched our efforts. At this writing, the book retains parts of its original structure and yet has included knowledge and practice froth so many others that it is only the vision that remains the same. Optimizing learning, synthesizing knowledge from many disciplines, and bringing together and integrating best practices from classrooms where children grow all added to the texture of the book. All of this is communicated to advocate for students whom the schools have designated as gifted learners. By sharing it, I hope that more children will grow up gifted and bring their gifts to the world. There are three parts to the book: Part I is intended to create an understanding of who gifted learners are, how they become gifted, and what giftedness and creativity are like as one grows cognitively, socially, emotionally, and intuitively. Part II builds on this understanding by describing school programs. How gifted learners can be supported at school and the services required to meet their needs and optimize their experiences are explored. A continuum of such services is discussed, and the options that schools can develop to serve gifted learners in the elementary, middle school, and high school programs are described. Homeschooling and global education are a part of this discussion. Evaluating programs to improve their quality, reach, and impact is explored. The methods and complexities of identifying giftedness are also found in this section. Part III is devoted to the theories and practices of teaching gifted learners. Numerous curriculum models used to provide education for gifted learners are described. The ideas for optimizing learning that have been evolving from the 1970s are organized and shared and the integrative Education Model, developed from translating brain research for use in the classroom, is briefly explained. Differentiating and individualizing the curriculum and the instruction, so necessary for gifted learners, are a part of the knowledge base shared in this section. Finally, the diversity of cultures and the effect they have on the development and the expression of giftedness is explored. The impact of gender, race, ethnicity, and poverty must be carefully considered and possible avenues of intervention understood if we are to overcome any barriers that students from these cultural groups might encounter. Gifted learners who are in need because of disabilities or underachievement and those learners who are limited by their experiences with cultural diversity must be helped to reverse the loss and realize the strength and richness that such diversity can bring. Only through extending our knowledge base and increasing the number of str


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...