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A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom,9780766830158
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A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780766830158

ISBN10:
0766830152
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/9/2002
Publisher(s):
CENGAGE Delmar Learning
List Price: $80.33
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Summary

A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom, 3E is an experienced based text which focuses on children ages three to eight years. Topics discussed are currently based on "self concept" psychology from such sources as Maslow, Rogers, Erikson and Ginott. The text is based on developmental psychology from such sources as Piaget and the DAP work of NAEYC. While these foundations are essential, the late twentieth century work on multiple intellegences and emotional intelligence blends well with the guidance approach. Concepts, principles and methods necessary to assist practicing and prospective teachers in building and maintaining an encouraging classroom are present in this text. Each chapter includes a section on building and maintaining parent-teacher relationships from a guidance perspective, and numerous antidotes allow students to observe the balance between research and application in validating the guidance approach. The text also examines the relationship between societal violence and mistaken behavior in the classroom, and provides new information on bullying. Developing the concept of "liberation teaching" as the guidance response to societal violence, it shows how "liberation teaching" can be used to prevent stigmas and build resiliency in vulnerable children.

Table of Contents

Preface xii
Acknowledgments xviii
PART ONE: FOUNDATIONS OF A GUIDANCE APPROACH 1(148)
The Guidance Tradition
3(32)
Pioneers of the Guidance Tradition
5(3)
Mid-20th-Century Influences: The Developmental and Self Psychologists
8(7)
The 1980s: Guidance or Obedience-Based Discipline
15(3)
The Transition from Discipline to Guidance
18(6)
Parents and the Guidance Tradition
24(4)
Summary
28(1)
Key Concepts
29(1)
Follow-Up Activities
29(2)
Recommended Readings
31(1)
References
32(3)
Child Development and Guidance
35(49)
Piaget: A Foundation for the Study of Child Development
37(6)
Vygotsky: The Role of the Adult in Personal Development
43(7)
Erikson: Personal Development and the Classroom
50(9)
Gardner and Goleman: New Views about Mental Abilities
59(7)
The Contributions of Brain Research
66(6)
A Climate for Partnerships with Parents
72(4)
Summary
76(2)
Key Concepts
78(1)
Follow-Up Activities
78(3)
Recommended REadings
81(1)
References
82(2)
Mistaken Behavior
84(34)
Beyond Misbehavior
85(1)
The Concept of Mistaken Behavior
86(2)
Relational Patterns: A Model for Social Development in the Classroom
88(4)
Three Levels of Mistaken Behavior
92(13)
Mistaken Behavior and Intentionality
105(3)
Communicating with Parents about Mistaken Behavior
108(3)
Guidance Tip for Talking with Parents About Their Children
111(1)
Summary
111(2)
Key Concepts
113(1)
Follow-Up Activities
113(3)
Recommended Readings
116(1)
References
116(2)
Guidance: The Bottom Line
118(31)
Guidance Means the Teacher is a Professional, not a Technician
120(1)
Guidance Depends on Positive Teacher-Child Relations
120(6)
Guidance Reduces Mistaken Behavior
126(5)
Guidance Takes a Solution-Orientation
131(6)
Guidance Included Liberation Teaching
137(2)
Guidance Requires Partnerships with Parents
139(2)
Summary
141(1)
Key Concepts
142(1)
Follow-Up Activities
142(3)
Recommended Readings
145(1)
References
145(4)
PART TWO: BUILDING THE ENCOURAGING CLASSROOM 149(162)
Organizing the Encouraging Classroom
150(39)
The Encouraging Classroom
151(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice and the Encouraging Classroom
152(9)
Learning Centers Organize the Encouraging Classroom
161(8)
Centers at the Primary Level
169(4)
Theme-Based Instruction in a Second Grade: A Case Study
173(4)
Encouraging Parents to be Classroom Volunteers
177(4)
Summary
181(1)
Key Concepts
182(1)
Follow-Up Activities
183(2)
Recommended Readings
185(1)
References
186(3)
Managing the Encouraging Classroom
189(46)
The Daily Program
190(9)
The Limits of Large Groups
199(11)
Managing Transitions
210(6)
Routines in the Encouraging Classroom: A Teacher's Perspective
216(2)
Guidance Means Teamwork with Other Adults
218(5)
Parents and Other Classroom Volunteers
223(4)
Summary
227(2)
Key Concepts
229(1)
Follow-Up Activities
230(2)
Recommended Readings
232(1)
References
233(2)
Leadership Communication with the Group
235(46)
Establishing Leadership
236(3)
Guidelines, not Rules
239(6)
Encouragement
245(6)
Discussing Inclusively
251(2)
Class Meetings: How They Build the Encouraging Classroom
253(9)
Encouraging Friendliness
262(3)
Leadership Communication with Parents
265(8)
Summary
273(2)
Key Concepts
275(1)
Follow-Up Activities
275(3)
Recommended Readings
278(1)
References
279(2)
Leadership Communication with the Individual
281(30)
Listening to Life Experiences
282(4)
Contact Talk
286(5)
The Compliment Sandwich
291(2)
Friendly Humor
293(3)
Friendly Touch
296(2)
Be There for the Children, Be There for Yourself
298(1)
Leadership Communication in the Parent-Teacher Conference
299(4)
Summary
303(2)
Key Concepts
305(1)
Follow-Up Activities
305(3)
Recommended Readings
308(1)
References
308(3)
PART THREE: SOLVING PROBLEMS IN THE ENCOURAGING CLASSROOM 311(188)
Using Conflict Management to Solve Social Problems
313(30)
Conflict Management: The Basics
315(4)
Developmental Considerations in Using Conflict Management
319(4)
The Five-Finger Formula for Conflict Management
323(3)
Teaching Conflict Management Skills
326(7)
Parent Involvement at St. Philip's: Building a Peaceable School Community
333(3)
Summary
336(2)
Key Concepts
338(1)
Follow-Up Activities
338(3)
Recommended Readings
341(1)
References
341(2)
Problem-Solving Mistaken Behavior
343(43)
The Decision to Intervene
344(8)
Quick Intervention Strategies
352(8)
Behaviors Reported by Other Children
360(1)
Intervention When Follow-up Is Needed
361(9)
Why Take the Time?
370(4)
Building Cooperation with Parents
374(5)
Summary
379(1)
Key Concepts
380(1)
Follow-Up Activities
381(2)
Recommended Readings
383(1)
References
384(2)
Guidance Through Intervention
386(42)
Conditions that Make Intervention Necessary
388(2)
Crisis Management Techniques
390(10)
Strategies for Working with Strong Needs Mistaken Behavior
400(11)
When Teachers Feel Anger
411(5)
When Teachers and Parents Disagree
416(5)
Summary
421(2)
Key Concepts
423(1)
Follow-Up Activities
423(2)
Recommended Readings
425(1)
References
426(2)
Liberation Teaching: A Guidance Response to Violence in Society
428(71)
The Violence Pyramid
429(5)
Liberation Teaching: The Guidance Response
434(7)
The Guidance Response to Bullying
441(6)
Liberation Teaching and Related Educational Practices
447(5)
Liberation Teaching and Parent Involvement
452(5)
Summary
457(1)
Key Concepts
458(1)
Follow-Up Activities
459(2)
Recommended Readings
461(1)
References
462(2)
APPENDICES
A. The National Association for the Education of Young Children Code of Ethical Conduct
464(9)
B. Sample Greeting Letters and Surveys to Children and their Families
473(7)
C. Sample Brochure: The Education Program in Our Class
480(7)
D. Developmentally Appropriate Guidance of Young Children (Position Statement of the Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children, 3rd edition)
487(10)
E. Individual Guidance Plan Worksheet
497(2)
Glossary 499(14)
Index 513


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