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A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom,9781418020101

A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9781418020101

ISBN10:
1418020109
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/7/2006
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $102.66

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This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 4/7/2006.
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Summary

A Guidance Approach for the Encouraging Classroom, now out in its 4th edition, can function easily as a primary reference for professionals or in classes that address group management, the learning environment, child guidance, child behavior, challenging behavior, conflict management, and peace education topics. New enhancements to this edition include the concept of challenging behavior, active classrooms, practical discussions of conflict management, and many new anecdotes and case studies. The age range addressed in the text is 3-8 years (pre-school to primary grade) and the book is divided into three parts. Part one looks at explores the foundation of guidance in early childhood education and covers such key concepts as conventional discipline versus guidance, mistaken behavior, the guidance tradition, and innovative theories about child development with guidance. Part two focuses on building an encouraging classroom. The reader starts off learning about the organization of the encouraging classroom, as well as key elements of an encouraging classroom including daily schedule, routines, use of thematic instruction, and working with parents. Leadership communication is also addressed in this section, and focuses on the importance of communication with staff, children, and parents. Tips and techniques are shared. Part three addresses problem solving and challenging behavior in the encouraging classroom. It includes practical illustration for how to use and teach conflict management and covers the five-finger-formula. Non-traditional families are covered and the effect of societal violence in the classroom is looked at, including bullying. This experience-based book that includes lots of real life anecdotes lends itself to learning and will allow the professional to make the shift from conventional classroom to developmentally appropriate guidance.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Acknowledgments xv
PART ONE: Foundations of a Guidance Approach
1(154)
Preview
1(2)
The Guidance Tradition
3(34)
Pioneers of the Guidance Tradition
4(6)
Mid-20th-Century Influences: The Developmental and Self Psychologists
10(8)
The 1980s: Guidance or Obedience-Based Discipline?
18(3)
Beyond Discipline to Guidance
21(5)
Parent-Teacher Relations in the Guidance Tradition
26(4)
Summary
30(2)
Key Concepts
32(1)
Follow-up Activities
32(2)
Recommended Readings
34(1)
References
34(3)
Child Development and Guidance
37(50)
Piaget: A Foundation for the Study of Child Development
38(7)
Vygotsky: The Role of the Adult in the Personal Development of the Child
45(8)
Erikson: Personal Development and the Classroom
53(8)
Gardner's Multiple Intelligences Contribute to the Guidance Tradition
61(6)
Emotional Intelligence: Defining the Central Guidance Issue
67(3)
The Contributions of Brain Research
70(5)
A Climate for Partnerships with Family Members
75(3)
Summary
78(2)
Key Concepts
80(1)
Follow-up Activities
81(3)
Recommended Readings
84(1)
References
85(2)
Mistaken Behavior/Challenging Behavior
87(38)
Beyond Misbehavior
87(2)
The Concept of Mistaken Behavior
89(2)
Relational Patterns: A Model for Social Development in the Classroom
91(4)
Three Levels of Mistaken Behavior
95(14)
Understanding Mistaken Behavior
109(6)
Communicating with Parents about Mistaken Behavior
115(3)
Summary
118(2)
Key Concepts
120(1)
Follow-up Activities
120(3)
Recommended Readings
123(1)
References
124(1)
Guidance: The Bottom Line
125(30)
Guidance Means the Teacher Is a Professional, Not a Technician
126(1)
Guidance Depends on Positive Teacher-Child Relations
127(5)
Guidance Reduces Mistaken Behavior
132(6)
Guidance Takes a Solution-Orientation
138(5)
Guidance Means Liberation Teaching
143(5)
Summary
148(1)
Key Concepts
149(1)
Follow-up Activities
150(3)
Recommended Readings
153(1)
References
153(2)
PART TWO: Building the Encouraging Classroom
155(168)
Preview
155(2)
Organizing the Encouraging Classroom
157(42)
The Encouraging Classroom
157(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice and the Encouraging Classroom
158(9)
Learning Centers in the Encouraging Classroom
167(8)
Centers at the Primary Level
175(3)
Case Study: A Second-Grade Theme (in These Academic Times)
178(10)
Encouraging Parents to Be Classroom Volunteers
188(4)
Summary
192(1)
Key Concepts
193(1)
Follow-up Activities
193(3)
Recommended Readings
196(1)
References
197(2)
Managing the Encouraging Classroom
199(46)
The Daily Program
199(9)
The Limits of Large Groups
208(12)
Managing Transitions
220(5)
Routines in the Encouraging Classroom: A Teacher's Perspective
225(2)
Guidance Means Teamwork with Other Adults
227(4)
Family Members and other Classroom Volunteers
231(5)
Summary
236(3)
Key Concepts
239(1)
Follow-up Activities
239(3)
Recommended Readings
242(1)
References
243(2)
Leadership Communication with the Group
245(46)
Establishing Leadership
246(2)
Guidelines, Not Rules
248(5)
Encouragement
253(6)
Discussing Inclusively
259(2)
Class Meetings: How They Build the Encouraging Classroom
261(11)
Encouraging Friendliness
272(4)
Leadership Communication with Parents
276(8)
Summary
284(1)
Key Concepts
285(1)
Follow-up Activities
286(3)
Recommended Readings
289(1)
References
289(2)
Leadership Communication with the Individual
291(32)
Listening to Life Experiences
293(7)
Contact Talk
300(5)
The Compliment Sandwich
305(1)
Friendly Humor
306(3)
Friendly Touch
309(3)
Be There for the Children, Be There for Yourself
312(1)
Leadership Communication in the Parent-Teacher Conference
313(3)
Summary
316(2)
Key Concepts
318(1)
Follow-up Activities
318(3)
Recommended Readings
321(1)
References
321(2)
PART THREE: Solving Problems in the Encouraging Classroom
323(152)
Preview
323(2)
Using Conflict Management
325(34)
The Essentials of Conflict Management
326(5)
Developmental Considerations in Using Conflict Management
331(4)
The Five-Finger Formula for Conflict Management
335(6)
Teaching Conflict Management Skills
341(7)
Family Diversity
348(4)
Summary
352(1)
Key Concepts
353(1)
Follow-up Activities
354(3)
Recommended Readings
357(1)
References
357(2)
Problem-Solving Mistaken Behavior
359(38)
The Decision to Intervene
360(7)
Four Quick Intervention Strategies
367(6)
Behaviors Reported by Other Children
373(1)
Intervention When Follow-up Is Needed
374(7)
Why Take the Time?
381(4)
Building Cooperation with Parents
385(5)
Summary
390(2)
Key Concepts
392(1)
Follow-up Activities
392(3)
Recommended Readings
395(1)
References
395(2)
Guidance Through Intervention
397(42)
Conditions that Make Intervention Necessary
398(2)
Four Crisis Management Techniques
400(13)
Comprehensive Guidance
413(10)
When Teachers Feel Anger
423(5)
When Teachers and Parents Disagree
428(4)
Summary
432(2)
Key Concepts
434(1)
Follow-up Activities
434(3)
Recommended Readings
437(1)
References
437(2)
Liberation Teaching: A Guidance Response to Violence in Society
439(36)
The Violence Pyramid
440(5)
Liberation Teaching: The Guidance Response
445(7)
The Guidance Response to Bullying
452(5)
Liberation Teaching and Related Education Practices
457(6)
Liberation Teaching and Parent Involvement
463(5)
Summary
468(1)
Key Concepts
469(1)
Follow-up Activities
469(3)
Recommended Readings
472(1)
References
472(3)
Appendices
475(42)
A. The National Association for the Education of Young Children Code of Ethical Conduct
475(10)
B. Sample Greeting Letters and Surveys to Children and Their Families
485(8)
C. Sample Guidebook: The Education Program in Our Class
493(8)
D. A Position Statement of the Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children
501(14)
E. Individual Guidance Plan Worksheet
515(2)
Glossary 517(10)
Index 527


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