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A Guide to Programming Logic and Design: Comprehensive,9780760011775

A Guide to Programming Logic and Design: Comprehensive

by
ISBN13:

9780760011775

ISBN10:
076001177X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Course Technology Ptr
List Price: $56.95

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This is the edition with a publication date of 8/1/1999.
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Table of Contents

Preface iii
An Overview of Computers and Logic
1(30)
Understanding Computer Programming
2(13)
Understanding Computer Components and Operations
2(3)
The Programming Process
5(1)
Understand the Problem
5(1)
Plan the Logic
6(1)
Code the Program
7(1)
Translate the Program into Machine Language
7(1)
Test the Program
8(1)
Put the Program into Production
9(1)
Understanding the Data Hierarchy
9(2)
Terms and Concepts
11(1)
Summary
12(1)
Exercises
13(2)
Introduction to Flowcharting and Pseudocode
15(16)
Using Flowchart Symbols and Pseudocode Statements
15(4)
Using Variables
19(2)
Ending a Program by Using Sentinel Values
21(2)
Using the Connector
23(1)
Format of Mathematical Statements
24(2)
Types of Data and Variables
26(1)
Terms and Concepts
27(1)
Summary
28(1)
Exercises
29(2)
Structure
31(30)
Understanding Structure
32(16)
Unstructured Spaghetti Code
32(1)
The Structures
33(7)
The Priming Read
40(4)
Reasons for Structure
44(1)
Terms and Concepts
45(1)
Summary
45(1)
Exercises
46(2)
Recognizing Structure and Using Special Structures
48(13)
Recognizing Structure
48(5)
Two Special Structures
53(1)
The Case Structure
54(1)
The Do Until Loop
55(2)
Terms and Concepts
57(1)
Summary
57(1)
Exercises
58(3)
Modules Hierarchy Charts, and Documentation
61(30)
Using Modules
62(15)
Modules, Subroutines, Procedures, Functions, or Methods
62(1)
Modularization provides abstraction
62(1)
Modularization allows multiple programmers to work on a problem
63(1)
Modularization allows you to reuse your work
64(1)
Modularization allows you to identify structures more easily
64(2)
Modularizing a program
66(3)
Modules Calling Other Modules
69(2)
Declaring Variables
71(1)
Creating Hierarchy Charts
72(2)
Terms and Concepts
74(1)
Summary
74(1)
Exercises
75(2)
Documentation
77(14)
Understanding Documentation
77(1)
Output Documentation
78(5)
Input Documentation
83(4)
Completing the Documentation
87(1)
Terms and Concepts
88(1)
Summary
88(1)
Exercises
89(2)
Writing a Complete Program
91(22)
The Structure of Procedural Programs and Initialization Tasks
92(10)
The Logical Flow Through a Program
92(3)
Housekeeping Tasks
95(1)
Declaring Variables
95(5)
Terms and Concepts
100(1)
Summary
100(1)
Exercises
101(1)
Finishing Housekeeping and Writing the Main-Loop and Finish Routines
102(11)
Other Housekeeping Tasks
102(1)
Opening Files
102(1)
Printing Headings
103(1)
Reading the First Input Record
103(3)
Writing the Main Loop
106(3)
Performing End-Of-Job Tasks
109(1)
Terms and Concepts
110(1)
Summary
110(1)
Exercises
111(2)
Making Decisions
113(36)
Beginning Decisions: Boolean and And Logic
114(18)
Evaluating Boolean Expressions to Make Comparisons
114(2)
Using the Logical Comparison Operators
116(4)
Understanding And Logic
120(5)
Writing And Decisions for Efficiency
125(2)
Combining Decisions in an And Situation
127(1)
Avoiding Common Errors in an And Situation
128(1)
Terms and Concepts
129(1)
Summary
130(1)
Exercises
130(2)
Advanced Selections: Or Logic and Decision Tables
132(17)
Understanding Or Logic
132(1)
Avoiding Common Errors in an Or Situation
133(1)
Writing Or Decisions for Efficiency
134(1)
Combining Decisions in an Or Situation
135(1)
Using Selections with Ranges
136(2)
Common Errors Using Range Checks
138(1)
Using Decision Tables
139(6)
Terms and Concepts
145(1)
Summary
145(1)
Exercises
145(4)
Looping
149(26)
Using Loops
150(11)
The Advantages of Looping
150(1)
Using a While Loop with a Loop Control Variable
150(2)
Using a Counter to Control Looping
152(5)
Looping with a Variable Sentinel Value
157(1)
Looping by Decrementing
158(1)
Terms and Concepts
159(1)
Summary
159(1)
Exercises
160(1)
More Loop Techniques
161(14)
Improving Loop Performance
161(1)
Using a For Loop
162(2)
Using the Do Until Loop
164(2)
Nesting Loops
166(2)
Using a Loop to Accumulate Totals
168(4)
Terms and Concepts
172(1)
Summary
172(1)
Exercises
173(2)
Control Breaks
175(28)
Single-Level Control Breaks
176(17)
Control Break Logic
176(1)
Single-Level Control Breaks
177(5)
Using Control Data Within the Control Break Module
182(5)
Control Breaks with Totals
187(4)
Terms and Concepts
191(1)
Summary
191(1)
Exercises
191(2)
Multiple-Level Control Breaks and Page Breaks
193(10)
Multiple-Level Control Breaks
193(5)
Page Breaks
198(3)
Terms and Concepts
201(1)
Summary
201(1)
Exercises
201(2)
Arrays
203(38)
Using Arrays
204(20)
Real-Life Arrays
204(1)
How Arrays Occupy Computer Memory
204(2)
Using an Array to Replace Nested Decisions
206(9)
Array Declaration and Initialization
215(2)
Run-Time and Compile-Time Arrays
217(2)
Loading an Array from a File
219(1)
Terms and Concepts
220(1)
Summary
221(1)
Exercises
221(3)
Using Parallel Arrays
224(17)
Searching for an Exact Match in an Array
224(2)
Using Parallel Arrays
226(7)
Searching an Array for a Range Match
233(3)
Terms and Concepts
236(1)
Summary
236(1)
Exercises
236(5)
Advanced Array Manipulation
241(32)
Sorts
242(18)
The Need for Sorting
242(1)
Using a Bubble Sort
243(9)
Refining the Bubble Sort by Using a Variable for the Array Size
252(3)
Refining the Bubble Sort by Reducing Unnecessary Comparisons
255(1)
Refining the Bubble Sort by Eliminating Unnecessary Passes through the List
256(2)
Terms and Concepts
258(1)
Summary
258(1)
Exercises
259(1)
Other Sorts
260(13)
Using an Insertion Sort
260(1)
Selection Sort
261(2)
Using Indexed Files
263(1)
Linked Lists
264(2)
Using Multidimensional Arrays
266(4)
Terms and Concepts
270(1)
Summary
271(1)
Exercises
272(1)
Using Menus and Validating Input
273(34)
Using Menus
274(21)
Using Interactive Programs
274(1)
Using a Single-Level Menu
275(5)
Coding Modules as Black Boxes
280(5)
Making Improvements to a Menu Program
285(2)
Using the CASE Structure to Manage a Menu
287(5)
Terms and Concepts
292(1)
Summary
292(1)
Exercises
293(2)
Multilevel Menus and Validating Input
295(12)
Using Multilevel Menus
295(5)
Validating Input
300(2)
Types of Data Validation
302(2)
Validating Presence of Data
304(1)
Terms and Concepts
304(1)
Summary
304(1)
Exercises
305(2)
Sequential File Merging, Matching, and Updating
307(32)
Sequential File Merging
308(13)
Examining Sequential Data Files to Use in a Merge Program
308(2)
Creating the Mainline and Housekeeping Logic for a Merge Program
310(3)
Creating the Main-Loop and Finish-Up for a Merge Program
313(4)
Modifying the Housekeeping Module to Check for EOF
317(2)
Terms and Concepts
319(1)
Summary
319(1)
Exercises
320(1)
File Matching and Updating
321(18)
Master and Transaction File Processing
321(1)
Matching Files to Update Fields in Master File Records
322(5)
Allowing Multiple Transactions for a Single Master File Record
327(1)
Updating Records in Sequential Files
328(8)
Terms and Concepts
336(1)
Summary
336(1)
Exercises
337(2)
Advanced Modularization Techniques and Object-Oriented Programming
339(28)
Advanced Modularization Techniques
340(16)
Principles of Modularization and Abstraction in Procedural Programs
340(5)
Passing Variables to Modules
345(4)
Returning a Value from a Module
349(2)
Using an IPO Chart
351(1)
The Advantages of Encapsulation
351(2)
Terms and Concepts
353(1)
Summary
353(1)
Exercises
354(2)
Object-Oriented Programming
356(11)
An Overview of Object-Oriented Programming
356(2)
Defining Classes
358(2)
Instantiating and Using Objects
360(1)
Inheritance
360(2)
Polymorphism
362(2)
The Advantages of Object-Oriented Programming
364(1)
Terms and Concepts
365(1)
Summary
365(1)
Exercises
366(1)
Programming Graphical User Interfaces
367(20)
Event-Driven Programming Using Components of Graphical User Interfaces
368(8)
Event-Driven Programming
368(2)
User-Initiated Actions and GUI Components
370(2)
Designing Graphical User Interfaces
372(1)
The Interface Should Be Natural and Predictable
372(1)
The Interface Should Be Attractive, Easy to Read, and Nondistracting
372(1)
To Some Extent, It's Helpful If Your Applications Can Be Customized by the User
373(1)
The Program Should be Forgiving
373(1)
The GUI Is Only an Interface
373(1)
Attributes of GUI Components
374(1)
Terms and Concepts
374(1)
Summary
374(1)
Exercises
375(1)
Developing an Event-Driven Application and Handling Exceptions
376(11)
The Steps to Developing an Event-Driven Application
376(1)
Understanding the Problem
377(1)
Creating Storyboards
377(1)
Defining the Objects in an Object Dictionary
378(1)
Defining the Connections Between the User Screens
379(1)
Planning the Logic
380(1)
Object-Oriented Error Handling: Throwing Exceptions
381(4)
Terms and Concepts
385(1)
Summary
385(1)
Exercises
386(1)
Program Design
387(16)
Program Design Issues
388(5)
The Need for Good Design
388(1)
Storing Program Components in Separate Files
388(2)
Selecting Variable and Module Names
390(2)
Terms and Concepts
392(1)
Exercises
392(1)
Coupling and Cohesion
393(10)
Organizing Modules
393(1)
Reducing Coupling
393(3)
Increasing Cohesion
396(1)
Functional Cohesion
396(1)
Sequential Cohension
397(1)
Communicational Cohesion
398(1)
Temporal, Procedural, Logical, and Coincidental Cohesion
399(1)
Maintaining Good Programming Habits
400(1)
Terms and Concepts
400(1)
Summary
401(1)
Exercises
402(1)
appendix a A Difficult Structuring Problem 403(12)
appendix b Using a Large Decision Table 415(7)
index 422


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